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Where Is Insulin Injected Into The Body?

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Are Diabetes Insulin Injections Painful?

Injecting yourself with insulin several times a day to manage your diabetes might be easier than you think. Follow these expert steps to help minimise the pain and calm your fears. 1. Know that it won't be as bad as you imagine Most people are nervous about injecting themselves but soon realise they can handle it. In fact thinking about it is worse than doing it and once you get over the 'hurdle' of the first few injections and become more confident, it's usually pretty smooth sailing. It could be that myths about what's involved are fuelling your fears. Some people think they'll have to inject the medication with a large needle into a muscle or a vein or that insulin injections will hurt more than the finger pricks they've been doing to test their blood sugar . This isn't true. The reality is the needles used to inject insulin are small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) and you inject into areas that have far fewer nerve endings than your fingertips. There may be some discomfort when the needle is first inserted but to ease any anxiety your doctor or a specialist diabetes nurse can show you the correct way to inject. If big needles freak you out, downsize. Insulin syringes and pen needles range in size and thickness (gauge), so ask your doctor or pharmacist for the most suitable shortest, thinnest one available. It's also important to use a fresh needle every time as just one use will dull the needle causing discomfort if it's reused. Wondering whether you should opt for a syringe or a pen? If you're anxious about getting the dose right then a pen may be the best choice. It's easier to dial the dose on a pen than it is to see the markings on a syringe. Some people also think pens are easier to grasp and that they look less like a Continue reading >>

Choosing An Injection Site

Choosing An Injection Site

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

How To Improve The Insulin Injection Experience

If you have type 1 diabetes, or if you have type 2 and have recently begun injecting insulin, you may have a bit of trouble getting used to the process of preparing and administering your own insulin shots. Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, of the Joslin Diabetes Center, says that injection technique is important to master not only for accurate dosing, but for comfort, too. "With proper practice and good technique, you can avoid pain during an injection," she states. Penney sat down with us recently to answer some common questions about insulin injection. If after reading and practicing insulin injections you still find you’re having trouble, Penney suggests seeing a Certified Diabetes Educator for more assistance. Q: How do I decide where to inject? A: People often select injection sites based on many factors: accessibility, presence of fatty tissue, and rate of insulin absorption (which will be discussed shortly). As a result, popular sites for injection include the stomach, outer thigh, the back of the arm (between the shoulder and the elbow), or the upper outside "wallet" area of the buttock (but not into the lower buttock area). Q: Once I decide on a location for an injection, how do I pick the right "spot"? A: Here are some easy guidelines: -Stomach If you’re going to inject into the stomach, stay at least two inches away from the bellybutton and/or any scars you may already have when using the abdomen for injections. -Thigh For an injection in your thigh, inject at least four inches or about one hand’s width above the knee and at least four inches down from the top of the leg. Do not inject insulin into your inner thigh because of the large number of blood vessels and nerves in this area. - Arm The area between the shoulder and elbow on the outside of the arm is usua Continue reading >>

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

25 September 12 Tips For Reducing Pain With Insulin Injections

For those of you with diabetes who take insulin, take heart! While insulin injections can sometimes cause pain or discomfort, there are tips for reducing or eliminating pain. Most of the tips reported here are taken from a presentation given by Stacey Seggelke, MS, RN, CNS, CDE, BC-ADM at the Rocky Mountain Metabolic Syndrome Symposium on May 14, 2010. Alcohol After swabbing your injection site with alcohol, wait for it to DRY before injecting insulin. Alcohol can feel like a burning sensation if it gets pushed in along with the insulin. Temperature Injecting insulin that is cold will hurt more than if it is at room temperature. Remove your unopened insulin from the refrigerator long enough in advance before use so that it is at room temperature when you need to use it. Once your vial or pen is in use, you can store it at room temperature (59F – 86F). Insulin vials can be stored at room temperature for up to 1 month. Most rapid-acting or long acting insulin pens can be stored for up to 28 days at room temperature. However, premixed insulin or intermediate N or NPH pens should be stored for up to only 10 – 14 days. Never guess at your insulin's room temperature storage guidelines - always check the information provided with your insulin for number of days it can be used at room temperature. Unopened insulin can be stored in the refrigerator (36F-46F) up until the expiration date. However, once the expiration date is reached, do not use the insulin – discard it. Dose Higher doses can hurt more than lower doses of insulin. For those of you with Type 2 diabetes, losing weight and regular exercise could improve your insulin sensitivity enough so that less insulin is needed to control your diabetes. And for folks with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes, good carb counting skills Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: What Is The Best Place To Inject Insulin?

Insulin Injection Sites: What Is The Best Place To Inject Insulin?

Whether you are a type 1 or a type 2 diabetes patient, you will be required to take insulin at some or the other stage of the disease. Most of the patients prefer insulin injections or syringes to take insulin in the body. When you are injecting insulin, an important consideration is a site where the same should be inserted. The objective is to insert the hormone appropriately with the least possible amount of pain. This article lays down the guidelines which shall help you inject insulin at the best possible part of the body. So, come and join in for the article “Insulin Injection Sites: What is the Best Place to Inject Insulin?” Areas Where Insulin Can be Injected Factors That Help in Deciding Where to Inject Insulin There are a few factors that should be kept in mind while you inject insulin. It is important to inject the insulin injections in the right area so that you can avoid pain while taking these injections. Following are a few factors to be considered before taking insulin injections: The most important factor is the presence of fatty tissue or those areas where there is a decent quantity of fat. Accessibility of the area is another factor to be considered The rate and speed in which the hormone insulin is absorbed in the body. According to the Joslin’s Diabetes Deskbook, the rate in which the hormone is absorbed is different in different areas. It is most quickly absorbed in the abdomen followed by the arms, thighs, and finally the buttocks. Basis the above factors, the following are the guidelines as to which can be the best place to inject insulin. Areas Where Insulin Can be Injected Keeping the above factors of insulin injection in mind, the injection can be inserted in any of the following areas of the body: Abdomen The most preferred site for insu Continue reading >>

​insulin Injection: How To

​insulin Injection: How To

Insulin injections help to control blood sugar in the body. Get advice on insulin injections from the Department of Endocrinology at Singapore General Hospital. Diabetes: all you need to know about insulin injections The insulin preparations currently available in Singapore are mostly from human origin; pork or bovine insulin preparations are hardly used nowadays. Because insulin is digested and destroyed by the stomach, it cannot be taken orally. Currently, the only way to receive insulin is by injection. Insulin should only be used when prescribed by a doctor and dose adjustments should be supervised. Types of preparations There are several types of insulin preparations available: They differ mainly in their onset and duration of action. The rapid and short-acting ones are used mainly to control high blood sugar levels after each meal whilst the intermediate and long-acting ones provide the patients with a smoother day long glucose control. Types of Insulin Preparations Onset of Action Duration of Action Rapid-acting 15 min 4 hours Short-acting 1/2 - 1 hour 6 - 8 hours Intermediate-acting 2-4 hours 16 - 18 hours Long-acting 4 - 8 hours 24 hours Premixed insulin 1/2 - 1 hour 16 - 18 hours Insulin should be given as instructed by the nurse or the pharmacist. The insulin preparations are available in vials, cartridges or penfills and disposable pens. The main precaution the patient needs to be aware of is the risk of developing low blood sugar levels. Low blood sugar levels may happen when the patient is not eating well, taking alcohol on an empty stomach or due to some drug interactions. How to draw a single type of insulin Wash and dry your hands. Clean the rubber stopper on the insulin vial with an alcohol swab. Roll the insulin vial gently between the palms your hand Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Areas

Insulin Injection Areas

Look at the dark pink areas on these pictures to find areas of the body where insulin is injected. Inject insulin into: The abdomen, but at least 5 cm (2 in.) from the belly button. The abdomen is the best place to inject insulin, because your abdomen area can absorb insulin most consistently. The top outer area of the thighs. Insulin usually is absorbed more slowly from this site, unless you exercise soon after injecting insulin into your legs. Rotate the location of the injection, and slightly change the injection spot each time you inject insulin. Using the same spot every time can form bumps or pits in the skin. For example, inject your insulin above your belly button, then the next time use your upper thigh, then the next time below your belly button. Medical Review: E. Gregory Thompson, MD - Internal Medicine & Donald Sproule, MDCM, CCFP - Family Medicine & Adam Husney, MD - Family Medicine & Rhonda O'Brien, MS, RD, CDE - Certified Diabetes Educator & David C.W. Lau, MD, PhD, FRCPC - Endocrinology This information does not replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise, Incorporated, disclaims any warranty or liability for your use of this information. Your use of this information means that you agree to the Terms of Use . Learn how we develop our content . To learn more about Healthwise, visit Healthwise.org . 1995-2017 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Diabetes: Giving Yourself An Insulin Shot

Introduction Insulin is used for people who have type 1 diabetes. It's also used if you have type 2 diabetes and other medicines are not controlling your blood sugar. If you have gestational diabetes, you may need to take insulin if diet and exercise have not helped to keep your blood sugar levels within your target range. With little or no insulin, sugar (glucose) in the blood can't enter your cells to be used for energy. This causes the sugar in your blood to rise to a level that's not safe. When your blood sugar rises past about 180 mg/dL, your kidneys start to release sugar into the urine. This can make you dehydrated. If that happens, your kidneys make less urine, which means your body can't get rid of extra sugar. This is when blood sugar levels rise. Taking insulin can prevent symptoms of high blood sugar. It can also help to prevent emergencies such as diabetic ketoacidosis (in type 1 diabetes) and hyperosmolar coma (in type 2 diabetes). Insulin can help lower blood sugar too. This can prevent serious and permanent health problems from long-term high blood sugar. Remember these key tips for giving insulin shots: Make sure you have the right dose of insulin, especially if you are giving two types of insulin in the same syringe. Practice how to give your shot. Store the insulin properly so that each dose will work the way it should. Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement is required by daily injections. At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While it is essential to give each injection in a slightly different spot within the one site, it is not advisable to change sites without first discussing it with your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. The range of injection devices and tiny needles available today make injecting insulin much easier than most people imagine. When starting insulin, your doctor and Credentialled Diabetes Educator will help you adjust to the new routine and task of giving insulin and find the right dose to reduce your blood glucose levels to acceptable levels. Insulin can be injected by an insulin syringe, an insulin pen with a fine needle, or via an insulin pump. Each method is chosen for a particular purpose and based on an individuals needs. Insulin syringes and insulin pens (pen needles) are currently th Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

If you use insulin, you will have various injection sites for use in injecting exogenous insulin. The most common site for injecting insulin is the stomach or abdomen. Other common areas include the upper part of the arms, the upper aspect of the hips or buttocks, and the outer aspect of the thighs. These are the best places to inject insulin because: These are parts of the body that have the most fatty tissue beneath the skin. Insulin needs to be injected into fatty tissue and in areas of the body that don’t have that many nerves. Injecting insulin in areas of the body that don’t have many nerves means that you will have less pain during the injection. These are areas of the body that have the most subcutaneous tissue. Insulin is usually injected into the subcutaneous tissue located in the above-mentioned areas. The best areas to inject insulin are dependent upon your body type. Some people find that putting insulin into the abdomen is preferable because it seems to absorb better in that area. For those who cannot pinch up at least a half-inch of fat on their abdomen need to look elsewhere for areas to inject insulin. Your doctor can help you decide which areas of the body are best for injecting insulin. Both the degree of insulin absorption and the places you rotate for the injections will be considered. Rotating Insulin Injection Sites If you have type 1 diabetes and inject insulin at least three times daily, you will need to consider rotating injection sites as it is not a good idea to inject insulin into the same site every time. Doing so can cause lumps of hard tissue or extra fatty deposits to occur within the tissues. The lumps will look bad and will absorb insulin at a different rate when compared to normal fatty tissue so it will be harder to keep your blo Continue reading >>

Administration Of Insulin

Administration Of Insulin

Are all insulins the same? No. You may be prescribed 1 or more types of Insulin. Normally your body makes insulin all day, but increases production at meal times. Therefore, you may need a long-acting insulin and a short- or rapid-acting insulin. Talk to your doctor and pharmacist to determine what type you need to use. Why is insulin injection only? Insulin cannot be taken in a tablet form. If we swallowed insulin the digestive enzymes in our stomach would break it down before reaching our bloodstream. Therefore, all insulin must be injected into our body. It is most commonly given as an injection directly under the skin. Certain types of insulin are injected in the vein but this must be done by a doctor or nurse. Insulin can be supplied in different ways. These options include an insulin PUMP, an insulin PEN, or an insulin VIAL. Recently, a patch/pen device has been approved, but is not available yet. This device is a pump-patch-pen combo and does not require batteries to release the insulin. Types of devices used for administering insulin: VERY IMPORTANT POINTS Use same area for injections. If you inject into thigh, always use thigh. OK to inject into right or left thigh. If you inject into arm, always use arm. OK to inject into right or left arm. If you inject into belly, always use belly. Inject at least 2 inches away from belly button. Rotate sites Rotating sites is very important. Why? It can be painful to inject in the same site frequently. Injecting in the same site can cause the skin tissue to become very hard. Injecting in the same site can cause increase in fat tissue at that site. The fat tissue alters the body's ability to absorb the insulin. How much insulin do I inject? The decision about what dose you need and the way in which it will be delivered to yo Continue reading >>

Fearful Of Insulin Injections? Your Top 5 Questions, Answered

Fearful Of Insulin Injections? Your Top 5 Questions, Answered

When you have type 1 diabetes, your doctor will prescribe insulin therapy for you. That’s because your body produces little or none of this critical hormone. (In contrast, if you have type 2 diabetes, insulin therapy typically comes into play only when other treatments aren’t effective.) You may feel some fear about starting insulin therapy. It’s perfectly natural to worry about starting injections. But they’re key to your treatment. Insulin will keep you from feeling fatigued and will help you prevent complications, including heart disease and organ damage. So doing your best to take your insulin as your doctor directs is important. Educating yourself about diabetes and about the injection process is a good first step. It will help you gain the confidence you need to follow through with your treatment plan. Here’s a primer on insulin, why you might need it and how to use it correctly. 1. Why do you have to inject insulin? Insulin injections are your most effective way to keep your blood glucose levels in a healthy range when lifestyle changes and other medications cannot. Because of the way your body breaks insulin down, you can’t take it in pill form. So insulin must be injected into the fatty layer of your skin. Although giving yourself shots poses a challenge at first, you will grow used to it. Depending on your needs, your doctor will prescribe insulin in either short-term or long-term doses: Short-term insulin: You will take this several times a day to manage blood sugar spikes when you eat. Long-term insulin: You will take this once daily to cover blood sugar spikes over 24 hours. Studies show that, once they start insulin injections, many patients intentionally skip doses. It’s important to view insulin injections not as a punishment, but as your k Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Insulin

Diabetes And Insulin

On this page: Diabetes mellitus (diabetes) is a chronic and potentially life-threatening condition where the body loses its ability to produce insulin, or begins to produce or use insulin less efficiently, resulting in blood glucose levels that are too high (hyperglycaemia). Blood glucose levels above the normal range , over time, can damage your eyes, kidneys and nerves, and can also cause heart disease and stroke. An estimated 280 Australians develop diabetes every day. Diabetes is Australia's fastest-growing chronic disease. The main types of diabetes are type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes. Type 1 diabetes Type 1 diabetes develops when the cells of the pancreas stop producing insulin. Without insulin, glucose cannot enter the cells of the muscles for energy. Instead the glucose rises in the blood causing a person to become extremely unwell. Type 1 diabetes is life threatening if insulin is not replaced, and people need to inject insulin for the rest of their lives. Type 1 diabetes often occurs in children and people under 30 years of age, but it can occur at any age. This condition is not caused by lifestyle factors. Its exact cause is not known but research shows that something in the environment such as the rubella virus can trigger it in a person that has a genetic risk. The body’s immune system attacks and destroys the beta cells of the pancreas after the person gets a virus because it sees the cells as foreign. Most people diagnosed with type 1 diabetes do not have family members with this condition. For more information about symptoms, visit the Diabetes type 1 fact sheet. Type 2 diabetes Type 2 diabetes develops when the pancreas does not make enough insulin and the insulin that is made does not work as well as it should (also known as insulin resistan Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

02:15 Dolly the Yorkie getting one of her two insulin shots a day. 00:59 How to give a dog a shot. Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up [1] for comfort. BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly [2]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog. [3] Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use [5] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy [6] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates [7] the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure. [8]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas. [9][10] Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization).[11] Other sites suggested by Dr. Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin?

What Is Insulin?

Essential for life, the hormone insulin regulates many metabolic processes that provide cells with needed energy. Understanding insulin, what insulin does, and how it affects the body, is important to your overall health. Tucked away behind the stomach is an organ called the pancreas, which produces insulin. Insulin production is regulated based on blood sugar levels and other hormones in the body. In a healthy individual, insulin production and release is a tightly regulated process, allowing the body to balance its metabolic needs. What does insulin do? Insulin allows the cells in the muscles, fat and liver to absorb glucose that is in the blood. The glucose serves as energy to these cells, or it can be converted into fat when needed. Insulin also affects other metabolic processes, such as the breakdown of fat or protein. Problems with insulin production or use The most common problem associated with insulin is diabetes. Diabetes occurs when the body either does not secrete enough insulin or when the body no longer uses the insulin it secretes effectively. Diabetes falls into two categories: Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas cannot produce insulin sufficiently to meet its own needs. This commonly occurs in children, and while an exact cause has not been found, many consider it to be an autoimmune disease. Some symptoms of type 1 diabetes include tiredness, increased urination and thirst, and problems with vision. Type 2 diabetes is more commonly associated with adults and lifestyle choices. People with type 2 diabetes will produce insulin but often not enough for their body's needs. They may also struggle to use the insulin they produce effectively. Patients may not know they have type 2 diabetes until they have an annual checkup, as symptoms tend to be mild un Continue reading >>

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