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Where Do You Inject Insulin?

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Video: How To Inject Insulin For Diabetes

Video: How To Inject Insulin For Diabetes

Are you nervous about injecting insulin for the first time? With a little practice you'll discover it only takes a few seconds. Watch our how-to video to help ease your anxiety. A transcript of this video is also available. More videos on living with diabetes: Read the transcript of the video, "How to Inject Insulin for Diabetes" below: Hi. My name is Jenny De Jesus, and I’m a registered nurse and certified diabetes educator. If you, or a loved one, has diabetes and has been prescribed insulin, there are several things you should be aware of: To begin, many types of insulin are available. Your health care provider will decide the best type, amount and administration times for you. It’s also important to know the ways in which insulin may be injected and which parts of the body are potential injection sites. It’s understandable if you’re nervous or anxious about injecting insulin for the first time. Although injecting insulin might feel awkward or scary at first, with a little practice you'll discover it only takes a few seconds. To help ease your anxiety, I’m going to show you how. Let’s get started. There are three primary tools used to inject insulin. They are: Insulin syringes Insulin pens And insulin pumps. There are four areas of the body in which insulin is injected. They are: The abdominal area Some parts of your arms Some parts of your legs And certain areas of the buttocks. The preferred injection site is the abdomen, specifically from the bottom of the ribs to the pubic line, avoiding the navel. The abdomen provides the best absorption and is relatively easy to reach. Avoid areas with scarring or moles because the tough tissue may not absorb insulin well. If your health care provider has prescribed insulin for you to inject using a syringe and vial Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about insulin syringes? Insulin syringes come in different sizes depending on the dose of insulin you need. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will help you find the right size syringe. Use the correct size insulin syringe to make sure you get the right dose of insulin. Where do I inject insulin? You can inject insulin into your abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, hip, and the front or side of the thigh. Insulin works fastest when it is injected into the abdomen. Do not inject insulin into areas where you have a wound or bruising. Insulin injected into wounds or bruises may not get into your body correctly. Use a different area within the site each time you inject insulin. For example, inject insulin into different areas in your abdomen. Insulin injected into the same area can cause lumps, swelling, or thickened skin. How do I inject the insulin with a syringe? Clean the skin where you will inject the insulin. You can use an alcohol pad or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Grab a fold of your skin. Gently pinch the skin and fat between your thumb and first finger. Insert the needle straight into your skin. Do not hold the syringe at an angle. Make sure the needle is all the way into the skin. Let go of the pinched tissue. Push down on the plunger to inject the insulin. Press on the plunger until the insulin is gone. Keep the needle in place for 5 seconds after you inject the insulin. Pull out the needle. Press on your injection site for 5 to 10 seconds. Do not rub. This will keep insulin from leaking out. Throw away your used insulin syringe as directed. Do not recap the syringe before you throw it away. How can I decrease pain when I inject insulin? Inject insulin at room temperature. If the insulin has been stored in the refr Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes And Injecting Insulin

Gestational Diabetes And Injecting Insulin

The insulin is often contained in a pen device with a very small needle that works with a spring. The injections are not usually painful, though they may feel worse if you are anxious. Once people learn to relax, they often find that it is straightforward. Insulin is usually injected into fattier areas such as your tummy, buttocks or thighs. It is important to pick different areas to inject in rotation so that lumps don’t develop under the skin. These can stop the insulin being properly absorbed. Some women feel worried about injecting into their tummy during pregnancy and prefer to use their thighs. In late pregnancy you might find it hard to reach your buttocks so your choice might be limited by where you can reach. Steps to injecting insulin Watch this film from Diabetes UK or follow the steps below Your diabetes team will teach you how to inject insulin, but you can use these steps as a quick reminder. You will need: a pen or syringe, a clean needle, a vial of insulin, a swab to clean the skin, a sharps bin for the used needle. Step 1 Expel two units of insulin into the air to make sure the needle is completely full of insulin. Step 2 Make sure you have the correct dose. Step 3 Decide where you are going to inject. Step 4 If you find the injections painful, rub ice on the area for 20 seconds. Then dry it. Step 5 Gently pinch a fold of skin, if your team has taught you to do this (usually only if you are very slim). Step 6 Put the needle in quickly. Step 7 Inject the insulin, making sure you have pushed down the plunger or button fully. Step 8 Count to ten before pulling the needle out. Step 9 If you pinched a skin fold in Step 4, now let it go. Step 10 Dispose of the needle safely in a sharps bin. Step 11 If you have any problems at all, contact your diabetes team Continue reading >>

How To Give Insulin Shots

How To Give Insulin Shots

Expert Reviewed Three Parts:Giving an Insulin Injection with a SyringeGiving an Insulin Injection with a PenUnderstanding the Need for InsulinCommunity Q&A Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas gland in order to shuttle glucose (sugar) from the bloodstream and into cells, which use it to produce energy. People with diabetes either can't produce any insulin at all (type 1) or their bodies can't produce enough (type 2),[1] so they need to inject synthetic forms of the hormone on a daily basis — as well as manage their diet and exercise. If you are a diabetic or have a child with diabetes and need insulin on a regular basis, you need to learn how to inject it properly. Make sure to consult with your doctor for a demonstration before you attempt to give an injection and ask her about proper dosage and your options for insulin delivery. Continue reading >>

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

Where Is The Best Place To Give Yourself Insulin Shots?

A: Insulin must be given into subcutaneous fatty tissue in order to absorb correctly. The preferred sites are the fatty tissue in the back of the upper arm, the abdomen (avoiding the belly button), the area on the top, middle outer aspect of the thigh, and the top of the buttock. Of these sites none is better than the others; it really depends on what is most convenient for you and the plan you have for rotating the injection sites. For instance, if you use the thigh for your morning Humalog before breakfast, then you may want to use the back of the arm for your lunchtime dose and your abdomen for your evening dose. Some people adjust their injection sites based upon how high their blood glucose level is, using the abdomen for quickest absorption and the buttock for slowest. However, with the newer insulins, injection site choice has less effect on absorption than was the case with NPH and regular insulin. Levemir is not approved for use in the buttock area, so this site should be avoided for your Levemir dose. Concerning how far apart to give Humalog and Levemir, we recommend injecting Humalog and Levemir at least 3 inches apart. Continue reading >>

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

Does Injected Insulin Hold Fat In The Stomach?

I am 83 years old and have had diabetes for 48 years. I have tried for seven years to lose weight, and I lose it everywhere except my stomach. I've injected insulin in my stomach for 45 years. Is it true that the insulin I inject holds the fat in my stomach? If so, how can I get rid of the stomach fat without moving the injection site to other parts of my body? Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

When you have a diabetic dog, changing their diet and lifestyle can seem like the "easy" part compared to having to give your dog a daily insulin shot. Here are 3 easy steps to administering an insulin shot. Take heart, it's actually easier than it looks. If your dog has been diagnosed with canine diabetes, your vet has probably prescribed insulin injections. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate the body’s blood sugar, or glucose, levels. Dogs with diabetes can only regulate their blood sugar with insulin injections, so you’ll have to learn to give a shot of insulin to your dog. Diabetes affects as many as 1 in 500 dogs. It’s a common health problem, and one that is manageable with consistent treatment and lifestyle changes. Many pet parents are understandably nervous about giving their dog shots, but when properly given they cause only minimal discomfort. Once you master these steps, the process will be a quick part of your—and your dog’s—routine. Your veterinarian will give you the proper dosage and the number of shots a day your dog needs –it’s important to give the injections at the same time each day. Step 1. Store the insulin carefully Insulin can be a fragile substance. It should not be exposed to direct sunlight or stored in high temperatures. Keep your unused bottles in the refrigerator, not frozen. Storing it in the fridge door is often recommended. If the insulin bottle looks frosted, was possibly exposed to heat, or the liquid seems unevenly colored, start with a new vial to be safe. Do not use insulin past the expiration date on the bottle. TIP: Although insulin is sensitive to extreme temperatures, bringing it to room temperature before use will not harm the hormone and may be more comfortable at the injection site for your pet. Step 2. Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Insulin Injection: Two Bottle Injection Instructions

Wash your hands. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle and turn it upside down. Roll the bottle gently between your hands to mix the insulin. Wipe the top of both (clear and cloudy) bottles with alcohol. Remove the caps from the top and bottom of the syringe. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for your CLOUDY insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLOUDY bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLOUDY bottle. Withdraw the empty syringe from the bottle. Set the bottle aside. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose as ordered. Insert the needle into the CLEAR bottle. Push the plunger down to inject air into the CLEAR bottle. Leave the needle in the bottle. Turn the bottle upside down with the needle in it. Pull the plunger down to the correct unit mark for the CLEAR insulin dose. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles in the syringe, push the insulin back into the bottle, and repeat steps 17 and 18. Pull the bottle away from the needle, and set aside the CLEAR bottle. Pick up the CLOUDY bottle of insulin. Turn the CLOUDY bottle upside down and push the needle into the bottle. Be very careful not to move the plunger. Pull the plunger down and withdraw the correct number of units for the CLOUDY insulin. The plunger should now be on the unit mark showing the total units of both the CLEAR and CLOUDY types of insulin. For example, 6 units of CLEAR insulin are already in the syringe. Add 14 units of CLOUDY insulin for a total of 20 units in the syringe. Pull the bottle away from the needle. Set both bottles on the table. Look for air bubbles in the syringe. If you see air bubbles, discard the dose and begin again. Set the syringe down. Do not let the needle touch anything. Pinch or spread the skin a Continue reading >>

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Flexpen

Giving Yourself An Insulin Injection With The Flexpen

This information describes how to prepare and give yourself an insulin injection (shot) with the FlexPen®. Your nurse will review these steps with you and help you practice them. Storing Your FlexPen® Keep all new, unused insulin pens in the refrigerator. Do not freeze them. Never put the pen you are using back in the refrigerator. Keep it at room temperature, away from heat and sunlight. Refer to the table below to know when to discard your FlexPen®. Insulin Type When to Discard your FlexPen® NovoLog® 28 days after piercing the rubber stopper NovoLog® Mix 70/30 14 days after piecing the rubber stopper Levemir® 42 days after piercing the rubber stopper Clear off a clean, flat tabletop to work on and gather the following supplies: The insulin your doctor prescribed: NovoLog® (clear), NovoLog® Mix 70/30 (cloudy), or Levemir® (clear) A new single-use pen needle Alcohol swabs A wastebasket A sharps container (a strong, plastic container with a tight cap). Do not store your sharps in glass bottles, soda bottles, milk jugs, aluminum cans, coffee cans, or paper or plastic bags. For more information, please read How to Store and Dispose of Your Home Medical Sharps. Wash your hands thoroughly with soap and water or use an alcohol-based hand sanitizer. Open an alcohol swab and wipe the rubber tip at the top of the pen (see Figure 1). Remove the tabbed paper from the outer cap of a new single-use needle (see Figure 2). Follow the steps below to prime the pen, set your dose, and inject the insulin. You must prime the pen before you set your dose and inject the insulin. You will do this by giving an “air shot”. This removes the air bubbles and ensures the pen and needle are working properly. Dial 2 units (to the number 2) on the dose selector dial by turning it clockwi Continue reading >>

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin: The Holy Grail Of Diabetes Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made by beta cells in the pancreas. When we eat, insulin is released into the blood stream where it helps to move glucose from the food we have eaten into cells to be used as energy. In people with type 1 diabetes, the body produces little or no insulin as the cells that produce insulin have been destroyed by an autoimmune reaction in the body. Insulin replacement by daily injections is required. In people with type 2 diabetes the body produces insulin but the insulin does not work as well as it should. This is often referred to as insulin resistance. To compensate the body makes more but eventually cannot make enough to keep the balance right. Lifestyle changes can delay the need for tablets and/or insulin to stabilise blood glucose levels. When insulin is required, it is important to understand that this is just the natural progression of the condition. RMIT University have produced a short overview of insulin, a drug that keeps in excess of one million Australians alive. Watch the video to understand why insulin is important and why so many Australians rely on it to stay alive. Copyright © 2015 RMIT University, Prepared by the School of Applied Sciences (Discipline of Chemistry). At this stage, insulin can only be injected. Insulin cannot be given in tablet form as it would be destroyed in the stomach, meaning it would not be available to convert glucose into energy. Insulin is injected through the skin into the fatty tissue known as the subcutaneous layer. You do not inject it into muscle or directly into the blood. Absorption of insulin varies depending on the part of the body into which you inject. The tummy (abdomen) absorbs insulin the fastest and is the site used by most people. The buttocks and thighs are also used by some people. While i Continue reading >>

Picture Of Insulin Injection Areas

Picture Of Insulin Injection Areas

Look at the dark pink areas on these pictures to find areas of the body where insulin is injected. Inject insulin into: The abdomen, but at least 2 in. (5.1 cm) inches from the belly button. The abdomen is the best place to inject insulin, because your abdomen area can absorb insulin most consistently. The top outer area of the thighs. Insulin usually is absorbed more slowly from this site, unless you exercise soon after injecting insulin into your legs. The upper outer area of the arms. The buttocks. Slightly change the injection spot each time you inject insulin. Using the same spot every time can form bumps or pits in the skin. For instance, use the right upper arm 5 times in different places, then use the left upper arm in 5 places. Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

Tweet When you are injecting insulin, you should aim to inject into the fatty tissue just underneath the skin. If you think you are injecting into the muscle, you may want to change your technique or ask your GP to prescribe shorter needles. The steps below are a broad guide to injecting insulin. If you plan to change your technique, check with your healthcare team, diabetic nurse or consultant for their advice. How to perform an insulin injection Firstly, prepare your kit. You will need: An insulin pen Enough insulin inside to give the required dose A new pen needle Cotton wool or a tissue Make sure you have your kit available at all times and if possible, inform your family as to its location. If you suffer from a hypo, this will allow your family to act quickly. Injecting your insulin shot To perform your insulin injection: Wherever possible, wash your hands with soap and water before injecting Put a new needle onto your pen Perform an ‘air shot’ of at least 2 units to clear any bubbles out of the needle – if you do not get a steady stream, repeat the air shot until you do get a steady stream Dial up your dose – how you do this exactly may depend on which pen you have Pick a soft fatty area to inject – tops of thighs, belly, bum and triceps (not always recommended for children or thinner people) Raise a fold of fatty flesh slightly between your thumb and fingers - leaving plenty of space between to put the needle in Put the needle in – if you are particularly slim, you may need to put the needle in at a 45 degree angle to avoid injecting into the muscle Push the plunger, to inject the dose, relatively slowly After the dose has been injected, hold the needle in for a good 10 seconds to prevent too much insulin from escaping out If any blood or insulin esca Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

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