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Where Are Insulin Shots Injected

What Would Happen If A Normal Person Took An Injection Of Insulin?

What Would Happen If A Normal Person Took An Injection Of Insulin?

Some medical trainees have done this very thing in a controlled settings, to better understand their patients. After taking the insulin, your sugar levels decline, which triggers a hypoglycemic (or low blood sugar) episode. The initial symptom is primarily an insatiable hunger, but if driven further can cause shaking, sweating, palpitations due to the body releasing counter-regulatory hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. If driven still further, the low blood sugar can lead to confusion/shock/seizures, and eventually death. Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat Care

Diabetic Cat Care

Information provided about specific medical procedures or conditions is for educational purposes to allow for educated, on-going discussion with your vet and is not intended to replace veterinary advice. More often than not, we are shown how to give insulin injections at the vet clinic before heading home with our diabetic cats. Typically we are instructed to give the shot into the scruff at the back of the neck area which is not optimal because there isn't great blood flow in the scruff which can result in the insulin not being absorbed, or working as well as it should. The reason our vets teach us to inject in the scruff is because they won't get bitten if they give shots there. Insulin should be injected into the subcutaneous fat layer (just below the skin) for absorption to be most efficient. If the insulin is injected too deeply, it could be injected into muscle which can accelerate the rate of absorption and cause the BG to drop more quickly. Alternatively, if insulin isn't injected deeply enough, there may be some leakage after the shot, which also reduces how effective the shot will be. Many find there are better absorption results if the bevel of the syringe is facing outwards from the body when giving shots. Injecting with the bevel side facing up/out allows for the needle to slide into the skin much easier resulting in shots being less painful. For more information click here.There is a lot of "real estate" when it comes to where to give cats their injections - anywhere from approximately 2 inches away from the spine, right down to the belly area, between the front and back legs is ideal. Giving shots at an angle, depending on the length of needle and the amount of fat layer your cat may have also helps with insulin absorption. Rotating where insulin shots ar Continue reading >>

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

In the past, doctors and nurses told patients to rotate their insulin shots to different sites on their bodies. Now we know that it's best to take insulin shots in the part of the body that matches the insulin action a person wants. See Illustration: Sites for Injecting Insulin Injection Areas and Action Insulin enters the bloodstream faster from some areas of the body than from others. Where you take your shot can affect your blood sugar levels. Generally, insulin enters the blood: Fastest from the abdomen (stomach area). A little slower from the arms. Even more slowly from the legs. Slowest from the buttocks. Exercising can also speed up the amount of time it takes for the insulin to enter your blood. You can figure out where to take your shot based on how quickly or slowly you want the insulin to enter your bloodstream. For example, if you're going to be exercising, such as walking or doing any kind of lifting, you probably don't want to take your shot in your leg or arm. Exercising those areas quickens the amount of time it takes for the insulin to get into your blood stream. This can cause your blood sugar to drop suddenly during or right after you exercise. If you plan to eat right after taking your shot, you might use a site on your stomach. That way the insulin will be available faster to handle the rise in your blood sugar after the meal. Rotate Sites in the Same Area Follow these guidelines when you choose a site to take your shot. Try to be consistent in where you take your shots. Always take your shot of fast-acting insulin in the stomach or arm. Take slower-acting insulin in the leg or buttocks. Try to avoid using the exact spot you used for your last shot. For example, space your next shot just an inch or so from your last previous shot. If you use the sam Continue reading >>

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Best Insulin Injection Sites: Absorption Time And Rotation

Insulin is a hormone that helps manage diabetes when it is injected into the body. It can't be taken as a pill or oral medication. This is because the enzymes in the stomach will break down the insulin before it reaches the bloodstream. Insulin injections are one of many ways to treat and manage diabetes. Others include dietary and lifestyle changes, and oral medications. For people who require insulin injections, there are different types of insulin available. It is important to understand and follow the instructions that the doctor provides about how and where to inject insulin. Common injection sites Insulin is injected into the layer of fat directly under this skin, known as subcutaneous tissue. It is injected with a small needle or a device that looks like a pen. There are several different sites where insulin can be injected, including: Abdomen The abdomen is a common site for insulin injection that many people with diabetes choose to use. To give an injection into the abdomen, take a pinch of the fatty tissue from either side between the waist and the hipbones. It should be about 2 inches away from the belly button. This site is easy to access and some people report that it causes less discomfort than other sites. Upper Arms The upper arm is another site where insulin injections can be given. The needle should be placed into the back of the arm (tricep area), about halfway between the elbow and the shoulder. The main disadvantage of this site is that it is very difficult to use for self-administration and may require somebody else to do it. It may be more comfortable to inject into the non-dominant arm. This means injecting into the left arm of a right-handed person or the right arm of a left-handed person. Thighs The thigh is also a very easy area for self-injec Continue reading >>

My Coworker Administers His Insulin Injections At His Desk Or At The Lunch Table In Front Of Everyone. Is It Appropriate?

My Coworker Administers His Insulin Injections At His Desk Or At The Lunch Table In Front Of Everyone. Is It Appropriate?

This is what keeps him alive every day. It is no different from taking a pill. “I find it extremely gross and I don’t understand why he feels the need to do this in front of everyone: ”I find your judgmental comment rather disgraceful. It demonstrates an astounding lack of empathy and compassion. Maybe “despicable” rather than “disgraceful” is a better word, actually. My son, who is 12, is a Type 1 diabetic (T1D). When at the restaurant, I encourage him to inject insulin at the table rather than in the bathroom, where hygiene could contaminate his diabetes gear. I tell him that he should never worry about doing what he needs to do for diabetes management in public, and that he should never take into account feedback from people like you who have a problem with it. After all, it’s only his life we are talking about. If what he does convinces people like you to forsake the restaurants we eat at, I would find it a positive development. Someday you may develop diabetes too — 1/3 of the US population today will. I am curious to see what you’ll say then. Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

The objective of our study was to determine the impact of anatomic site and injection technique on insulin absorption in the elderly. Twenty elderly insulin-naïve subjects (age 80 ± 1 years; sex 7 female, 13 male; BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2; diabetes duration 11 ± 2 years; A1C 7.1 ± 0.2% [54 ± 2 mmol/mol]) were studied (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01213901). All subjects provided informed written consent (Declaration of Helsinki). Subjects underwent three 360-min euglycemic glucose clamp studies in random order. In each, 0.1 units/kg of insulin lispro (Humalog; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) was administered subcutaneously using a 5-mm needle. The investigator conducting the clamp and the technician collecting samples were blind to treatment. In two studies, insulin was given 6.0 cm from the umbilicus using either a skin lift or no skin lift (1). In the third, insulin was injected into the upper arm without skin lift. Pain of injection was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Samples were taken regularly to measure glucose and insulin. Differences among studies were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There was no significant difference in glucose values or infusion rates (data not shown). There was a significant study/time interaction among studies in insulin values (Fig. 1) (F = 2.5, P < 0.05), implying that injection into the abdominal site resulted in higher peak insulin values, but the difference was not clinically significant. Pain was minimal with injection and did not differ among sites. It was difficult to maintain the skin lift in many elderly subjects because the subcutaneous tissue collapsed before injection could be completed. In younger subjects, insulin is absorbed more quickly from the abdomen than peripheral sites (2–7). Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for injecting insulin. For some people, this site is not suitable, and other sites must be used. These include the upper arms, the upper buttocks and the outside of the thigh. All of these sites are most effective because they have a layer of fat to absorb the insulin better. This process directly injects insulin into the subcutaneous tissue. These areas also have fewer nerve endings, meaning that they are the least painful areas in which to inject. Should I switch the site where I inject insulin? Your healthcare team should be able to help you to decided the best places to inject insulin, when you shou Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

Insulin Treatment

Insulin Treatment

Insulin is a hormone made in your pancreas, which lies just behind your stomach. It helps our bodies use glucose for energy. Everyone with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need to take insulin – either by injection or a pump – to control their blood glucose levels (also called blood sugar levels). Injecting insulin Insulin is injected using a syringe and needle, or an insulin pen or needle. The needles used are very small as the insulin only needs to be injected under the skin (subcutaneously) – not into a muscle or vein. Once it's been injected, it soaks into small blood vessels and is taken into the bloodstream. As your confidence grows and you become more relaxed, injections will get easier and soon become second nature. The most frequently used injection sites are the thighs, buttocks and abdomen. You may be able to inject into your upper arms, but check with your diabetes team first as this isn't always suitable. As all these areas cover a wide skin area, you should inject at different sites within each of them. It is important to rotate injection sites, as injecting into the same place can cause a build up of lumps under the skin (also known as lipohypertrophy), which make it harder for your body to absorb and use the insulin properly. The three groups of insulin There are three groups of insulin – animal, human (not from humans but produced synthetically to match human insulin) and analogues (the insulin molecule is like a string of beads; scientists have managed to alter the position of some of these beads to create 'analogues' of insulin). Nowadays, most people use human insulin and insulin analogues, although a small number of people still use animal insulin because they have some evidence that they otherwise lose their awareness of Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about insulin syringes? Insulin syringes come in different sizes depending on the dose of insulin you need. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will help you find the right size syringe. Use the correct size insulin syringe to make sure you get the right dose of insulin. Where do I inject insulin? You can inject insulin into your abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, hip, and the front or side of the thigh. Insulin works fastest when it is injected into the abdomen. Do not inject insulin into areas where you have a wound or bruising. Insulin injected into wounds or bruises may not get into your body correctly. Use a different area within the site each time you inject insulin. For example, inject insulin into different areas in your abdomen. Insulin injected into the same area can cause lumps, swelling, or thickened skin. How do I inject the insulin with a syringe? Clean the skin where you will inject the insulin. You can use an alcohol pad or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Grab a fold of your skin. Gently pinch the skin and fat between your thumb and first finger. Insert the needle straight into your skin. Do not hold the syringe at an angle. Make sure the needle is all the way into the skin. Let go of the pinched tissue. Push down on the plunger to inject the insulin. Press on the plunger until the insulin is gone. Keep the needle in place for 5 seconds after you inject the insulin. Pull out the needle. Press on your injection site for 5 to 10 seconds. Do not rub. This will keep insulin from leaking out. Throw away your used insulin syringe as directed. Do not recap the syringe before you throw it away. How can I decrease pain when I inject insulin? Inject insulin at room temperature. If the insulin has been stored in the refr Continue reading >>

All About Injections

All About Injections

A healthcare professional trained in injection techniques can teach you how to do it right The following recommendations apply to people with diabetes being treated with insulin injections or GLP-1 analogues (albiglutide (EperzanTM), dulaglutide (Trulicity®), exenatide (Byetta®), exenatide sustained release (Bydureon®) and liraglutide (Victoza®)). They are based on the Recommendations for Best Practice in Injection Technique (2015) from the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT). Preparing for injection Follow these important steps before an injection: Wash your hands and the injection site with soap and water, and dry well. If you use an alcohol swab (e.g.: in a hospital), let the skin dry completely before administering the injection. Check that the vial or cartridge has not passed its expiration date. Wipe the cartridge or vial with an alcohol swab. When using cloudy insulin, gently roll the cartridge, vial or pen device 10 times, then tip it (do not shake) 10 times. Finally, inspect it to ensure that the suspension has a consistently milky white appearance. Is a skin lift necessary? In adults, a skin lift is used in some situations, based on needle length and the amount of adipose (fat) tissue. A skin lift should be used when the needle is 8 mm or longer. In addition, in people whose arms and legs or abdomen have little fatty tissue, a skin fold might be justified when using a needle of 5 mm or 6 mm. A skinfold may not be necessary especially when using a 4 mm needle . A skin lift, if required, must be done properly to ensure that the medication is not injected into the muscle or not deeply enough. Injection areas In adults, the recommended injection areas are the following: abdomen thighs upper buttocks back of the upper arm (not a preferred area because of the di Continue reading >>

Subcutaneous Or Intramuscular Insulin Injections.

Subcutaneous Or Intramuscular Insulin Injections.

Abstract To find out whether diabetic children may inject their insulin intramuscularly rather than subcutaneously, a random sample of 32 patients aged 4.3-17.9 (median 11.3) years was studied. Distance from skin to muscle fascia was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm, anterior and lateral thigh, abdomen, buttock, and calf. Distances were greater in girls (n = 15) than in boys (n = 17). Whereas in most boys the distances were less than the length of the needle (12.5 mm) at all sites except the buttock, in most girls, the distances were greater than 12.5 mm except over the calf. Over the fascial plane just lateral to the rectus muscle the distance from skin to peritoneum was less than 12.5 mm in 14 of the 17 boys and one of the 15 girls. Twenty five of the 32 children injected at an angle of 90 degrees, and 24 children raised a skinfold before injecting. By raising a skinfold over the anterior thigh, the distance from skin to muscle fascia was increased by 19% (range 0-38%). We conclude that most boys and some girls who use the perpendicular injection technique may often inject insulin into muscle, and perhaps on occasions into the peritoneal cavity. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (773K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

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