diabetestalk.net

Where Are Insulin Shots Injected

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

Suitable Injection Sites

Suitable Injection Sites

Insulin is not absorbed at the same speed at all sites Abdomen and thighs are the most common injection sites.2 At least 1 cm distance from the navel for adults. At least 3 cm distance from the navel for children. Injection sites on the abdomen allow rapid insulin absorption. Injection sites on the thighs and buttocks allow slower insulin absorption for some insulins. The effect of analog insulins is less dependent on the injection site. Follow the recommendations given by your healthcare professional. Rotation principle for injection sites – Avoiding lipohypertrophy Change the injection site after every injection (rotation principle). For adults, the injection sites should be at least 1 cm away from each other to avoid frequent injections into so-called “favourite sites” and thus leading to tissue hardening (lipohypertrophy). Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 2 Upper arms as injection sites: injections into the upper arms should only be performed after training by your healthcare professional. The reason is a higher risk of injecting into the muscle as the subcutaneous fatty tissue is usually thin and injection sites are not easily accessible. Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

How To Give A Shot Of Insulin For Dogs In 3 Steps

When you have a diabetic dog, changing their diet and lifestyle can seem like the "easy" part compared to having to give your dog a daily insulin shot. Here are 3 easy steps to administering an insulin shot. Take heart, it's actually easier than it looks. If your dog has been diagnosed with canine diabetes, your vet has probably prescribed insulin injections. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate the body’s blood sugar, or glucose, levels. Dogs with diabetes can only regulate their blood sugar with insulin injections, so you’ll have to learn to give a shot of insulin to your dog. Diabetes affects as many as 1 in 500 dogs. It’s a common health problem, and one that is manageable with consistent treatment and lifestyle changes. Many pet parents are understandably nervous about giving their dog shots, but when properly given they cause only minimal discomfort. Once you master these steps, the process will be a quick part of your—and your dog’s—routine. Your veterinarian will give you the proper dosage and the number of shots a day your dog needs –it’s important to give the injections at the same time each day. Step 1. Store the insulin carefully Insulin can be a fragile substance. It should not be exposed to direct sunlight or stored in high temperatures. Keep your unused bottles in the refrigerator, not frozen. Storing it in the fridge door is often recommended. If the insulin bottle looks frosted, was possibly exposed to heat, or the liquid seems unevenly colored, start with a new vial to be safe. Do not use insulin past the expiration date on the bottle. TIP: Although insulin is sensitive to extreme temperatures, bringing it to room temperature before use will not harm the hormone and may be more comfortable at the injection site for your pet. Step 2. Continue reading >>

Subcutaneous Or Intramuscular Insulin Injections.

Subcutaneous Or Intramuscular Insulin Injections.

Abstract To find out whether diabetic children may inject their insulin intramuscularly rather than subcutaneously, a random sample of 32 patients aged 4.3-17.9 (median 11.3) years was studied. Distance from skin to muscle fascia was measured by ultrasonography at standard injection sites on the outer arm, anterior and lateral thigh, abdomen, buttock, and calf. Distances were greater in girls (n = 15) than in boys (n = 17). Whereas in most boys the distances were less than the length of the needle (12.5 mm) at all sites except the buttock, in most girls, the distances were greater than 12.5 mm except over the calf. Over the fascial plane just lateral to the rectus muscle the distance from skin to peritoneum was less than 12.5 mm in 14 of the 17 boys and one of the 15 girls. Twenty five of the 32 children injected at an angle of 90 degrees, and 24 children raised a skinfold before injecting. By raising a skinfold over the anterior thigh, the distance from skin to muscle fascia was increased by 19% (range 0-38%). We conclude that most boys and some girls who use the perpendicular injection technique may often inject insulin into muscle, and perhaps on occasions into the peritoneal cavity. Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (773K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Links to PubMed are also available for Selected References. These references are in PubMed. This may not be the complete list of references from this article. Continue reading >>

Choosing An Injection Site

Choosing An Injection Site

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

People Who Are Diabetic (type 1/juvenile Diabetes) Use Insulin Pens Through Which They Inject External Insulin To The Body. After Use, Where Should We Dispose The Used Needle Of The Pen/syringe?

People Who Are Diabetic (type 1/juvenile Diabetes) Use Insulin Pens Through Which They Inject External Insulin To The Body. After Use, Where Should We Dispose The Used Needle Of The Pen/syringe?

Facilites for safe disposal of medical waste by the public are not available in most Indian cities. Your best bet is to invest in a “needle and syringe destroyer” for safely destroying used insulin pens and needles. Many models and brands are available and they can be bought from firms supplying surgical/ hospital equipment. Your doctor / hospital may be able to suggest a reliable brand. They can be ordered and bought online through amazon and similar e commerce portals. Query for “ Medical waste disposal equipment”. A search in amazon India shows: MCP Needle Syringe destroyer SS Rs.1304, Max Care Needle syringe destroyer 100w Rs.1699 and Sai Life electronic needle & syringe destroyer Rs.1441. Most can be used for 300 to 400 cycles and have to be replaced after that i.e roughly every year. The scrap coming from out of the needle and syringe destroyer can be put in a thick plastic/ metal box , sealed securely and disposed off along with other household waste . Continue reading >>

What Would Happen If A Normal Person Took An Injection Of Insulin?

What Would Happen If A Normal Person Took An Injection Of Insulin?

Some medical trainees have done this very thing in a controlled settings, to better understand their patients. After taking the insulin, your sugar levels decline, which triggers a hypoglycemic (or low blood sugar) episode. The initial symptom is primarily an insatiable hunger, but if driven further can cause shaking, sweating, palpitations due to the body releasing counter-regulatory hormones like cortisol and adrenaline. If driven still further, the low blood sugar can lead to confusion/shock/seizures, and eventually death. Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection

Giving An Insulin Injection

Your health care provider or a certified diabetes educator (CDE) will teach you all of these steps, watch you practice, and answer your questions. You may take notes to remember the details. Know the name and dose of each medicine to give. The type of insulin should match the type of syringe: Standard insulin contains 100 units in 1 mL. This is also called U-100 insulin. Most insulin syringes are marked for giving you U-100 insulin. Every notch on a standard 1 mL insulin syringe is 1 unit of insulin. More concentrated insulins are now available. These include U-500 and U-300. Because U-500 syringes may be difficult to find, your provider may give you instructions for using U-500 insulin with U-100 syringes. Insulin syringes or concentrated insulin are now widely available. DO NOT mix or dilute their concentrated insulin with any other insulin. Some types of insulin can be mixed with each other in one syringe, but many cannot be mixed. Check with your provider or pharmacist about this. Other general tips: Always use the same brands and types of supplies. DO NOT use expired insulin. Insulin should be given at room temperature. If you had it in the refrigerator or cooler bag, take it out 30 minutes before the injection. Once you have started using a vial of insulin, it can be kept at room temperature for a month. Gather your supplies: insulin, needles, syringes, alcohol wipes, and a container for used needles and syringes. To fill a syringe with one type of insulin: Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin bottle label. Make sure it is the right insulin. Make sure it is not expired. The insulin should not have any clumps on the sides of the bottle. If it does, throw it out and get another bottle. Intermediate-acting insulin (N or NPH) is cloudy Continue reading >>

Can The Police Stop You From Taking Insulin During A Dui Stop?

Can The Police Stop You From Taking Insulin During A Dui Stop?

Most probably yes. Unless you’re actually intoxicated, a DUI stop usually only lasts a few minutes, and you can thus most likely defer your injection until the stop is over. During the stop, the officer is entitled to control your actions, and can prohibit you from doing anything that interferes with the officer’s official duties or tends to put the officer in danger. While an insulin pen or needle is a fairly poor weapon, it is a weapon and I can understand an officer being reluctant to allow someone to self-administer insulin during a stop. Insulin injection timing is usually not very time critical. The best time for a Type 1 diabetic to take a shot of regular (fast-acting) insulin is 30 minutes before eating; thus, you can simply defer your shot until after the stop and start your meal a bit later than previously planned. Most Type 2 diabetics do not use insulin shots; those who do tend to use time-delay formulations that can tolerate an hour or more in variation in dosage scheduling without significant clinical impact. Thus, it’s not plausible that a diabetic would have an emergent need for an insulin injection unless he or she had previously engaged in a serious sugar binge without pre-injecting, which would be seriously unwise behavior. I can see a larger need for a glucagon injection in the situation where a diabetic had taken a fast-acting insulin injection anticipating a meal, but then had that meal delayed because of a DUI stop. But there’s two problems with this scenario and your question: first, you said “insulin”, not “glucagon”, and second, most Type 1 diabetics carry a small supply of candies or other sugar sources that they can use for emergencies like this to prevent a sugar crash. It’s much less likely that an officer would object to Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

Giving the injection Selecting the injection site There are 4 safe areas for insulin injections. Thighs: Top and outer areas only. Do not use the inner side or back of the thigh. Stay about 4 of the child’s finger widths away from the knee and groin. Upper arms: Fleshy area on the side and back of the arms. Avoid the muscle in the shoulder. Stay 3 to 4 finger widths away from the elbow. Abdomen: Right across the abdomen, from just below the ribcage to well below the belt line. Stay about 2 finger widths away from the navel. Buttocks: Fleshy area (i.e. pants pocket area). Insulin may be absorbed differently from one site than another. Absorption is most predictable when injections are given in the abdomen and buttocks. In general, insulin injected into the upper arms or thighs is not absorbed as predictably. Also, insulin injected over an exercising muscle may be absorbed more quickly. For that reason, it’s wise to avoid injecting into the arms or thighs of someone who’s planning heavy exercise involving these muscles. In other words, runners should avoid injecting into the thighs, rowers should avoid injecting into the arms, and so on. Injections are done in a pattern to avoid using exactly the same site over and over. Make sure that each injection is about 1 inch (2.5 cm) or 2 finger widths from the one done before. Try to work in straight, even rows about an inch apart. This way you’re more likely to remember where the last injection was given. Rotating injection sites Many people with diabetes, children especially, develop “favourite” injection sites where there seems to be less pain and injections seem easier. If the same small area is used many times, the fat tissue below the skin swells, a condition called lipohypertrophy. This creates large bumps that Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

The objective of our study was to determine the impact of anatomic site and injection technique on insulin absorption in the elderly. Twenty elderly insulin-naïve subjects (age 80 ± 1 years; sex 7 female, 13 male; BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2; diabetes duration 11 ± 2 years; A1C 7.1 ± 0.2% [54 ± 2 mmol/mol]) were studied (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01213901). All subjects provided informed written consent (Declaration of Helsinki). Subjects underwent three 360-min euglycemic glucose clamp studies in random order. In each, 0.1 units/kg of insulin lispro (Humalog; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) was administered subcutaneously using a 5-mm needle. The investigator conducting the clamp and the technician collecting samples were blind to treatment. In two studies, insulin was given 6.0 cm from the umbilicus using either a skin lift or no skin lift (1). In the third, insulin was injected into the upper arm without skin lift. Pain of injection was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Samples were taken regularly to measure glucose and insulin. Differences among studies were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There was no significant difference in glucose values or infusion rates (data not shown). There was a significant study/time interaction among studies in insulin values (Fig. 1) (F = 2.5, P < 0.05), implying that injection into the abdominal site resulted in higher peak insulin values, but the difference was not clinically significant. Pain was minimal with injection and did not differ among sites. It was difficult to maintain the skin lift in many elderly subjects because the subcutaneous tissue collapsed before injection could be completed. In younger subjects, insulin is absorbed more quickly from the abdomen than peripheral sites (2–7). Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

More in insulin