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Where Are Insulin Shots Injected

Insulin Injection

Insulin Injection

Insulin injection is used to control blood sugar in people who have type 1 diabetes (condition in which the body does not make insulin and therefore cannot control the amount of sugar in the blood) or in people who have type 2 diabetes (condition in which the blood sugar is too high because the body does not produce or use insulin normally) that cannot be controlled with oral medications alone. Insulin injection is in a class of medications called hormones. Insulin injection is used to take the place of insulin that is normally produced by the body. It works by helping move sugar from the blood into other body tissues where it is used for energy. It also stops the liver from producing more sugar. All of the types of insulin that are available work in this way. The types of insulin differ only in how quickly they begin to work and how long they continue to control blood sugar. Over time, people who have diabetes and high blood sugar can develop serious or life-threatening complications, including heart disease, stroke, kidney problems, nerve damage, and eye problems. Using medication(s), making lifestyle changes (e.g., diet, exercise, quitting smoking), and regularly checking your blood sugar may help to manage your diabetes and improve your health. This therapy may also decrease your chances of having a heart attack, stroke, or other diabetes-related complications such as kidney failure, nerve damage (numb, cold legs or feet; decreased sexual ability in men and women), eye problems, including changes or loss of vision, or gum disease. Your doctor and other healthcare providers will talk to you about the best way to manage your diabetes. Insulin comes as a solution (liquid) and a suspension (liquid with particles that will settle on standing) to be injected subcutaneousl Continue reading >>

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

Diabetes, Insulin Administration Tips

If your pet has diabetes, your veterinarian may have prescribed insulin for her. Some pet owners balk at the idea of giving their pet a regular injection, but the types of syringes used, the small amount injected, and the ease of injecting subcutaneously ensure that most pet owners can quickly learn to give the most comfortable injection possible. Insulin measurement: The concentration of insulin is measured in units. Insulin syringes are marked in units, and may also be marked in milliliters. Be sure to use the unit scale. Also, be sure you are using the appropriate insulin syringe for the concentration of insulin you are using. Insulin is available in concentrations of 40 and 100 units/ml. There are corresponding syringes to use for the measurement of the two concentrations of insulin. Pharmacy Note: Insulin comes in a glass vial with a rubber stopper, and must be stored in the refrigerator. Do not use the insulin beyond its expiration date. Different insulin types require different syringes: It is imperative to measure and administer the correct dose of insulin using the correct syringe. For instance, if you use insulin with 40 U/ml, you must measure and administer it with a U-40 syringe; if you used a U-100 syringe, it would result in the wrong amount of insulin being given, with perhaps a fatal outcome. Find out from your veterinarian (or pharmacist) what syringes are available for you to use with the concentration of insulin your pet is receiving. Pharmacy Note: An insulin syringe has 4 basic parts: the barrel, plunger, needle, and needle guard. Many brands of syringes have the needle permanently attached to the syringe barrel so it cannot be removed. How to draw up insulin for your pet: Prior to removing a dose of insulin from the vial, mix the contents by gently Continue reading >>

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

Optimizing Insulin Absorption And Insulin Injection Technique In Older Adults

The objective of our study was to determine the impact of anatomic site and injection technique on insulin absorption in the elderly. Twenty elderly insulin-naïve subjects (age 80 ± 1 years; sex 7 female, 13 male; BMI 29 ± 1 kg/m2; diabetes duration 11 ± 2 years; A1C 7.1 ± 0.2% [54 ± 2 mmol/mol]) were studied (clinicaltrials.gov NCT01213901). All subjects provided informed written consent (Declaration of Helsinki). Subjects underwent three 360-min euglycemic glucose clamp studies in random order. In each, 0.1 units/kg of insulin lispro (Humalog; Eli Lilly, Indianapolis, IN) was administered subcutaneously using a 5-mm needle. The investigator conducting the clamp and the technician collecting samples were blind to treatment. In two studies, insulin was given 6.0 cm from the umbilicus using either a skin lift or no skin lift (1). In the third, insulin was injected into the upper arm without skin lift. Pain of injection was evaluated using a visual analog scale. Samples were taken regularly to measure glucose and insulin. Differences among studies were evaluated with repeated measures ANOVA. P < 0.05 was considered significant. There was no significant difference in glucose values or infusion rates (data not shown). There was a significant study/time interaction among studies in insulin values (Fig. 1) (F = 2.5, P < 0.05), implying that injection into the abdominal site resulted in higher peak insulin values, but the difference was not clinically significant. Pain was minimal with injection and did not differ among sites. It was difficult to maintain the skin lift in many elderly subjects because the subcutaneous tissue collapsed before injection could be completed. In younger subjects, insulin is absorbed more quickly from the abdomen than peripheral sites (2–7). Continue reading >>

How To Use An Insulin Pen

How To Use An Insulin Pen

Instructions Use the following instructions when injecting insulin for diabetes. Do not mix your diabetes medicine with any other medicines. Where to give shots Choose an injection area in your abdomen, upper or outer thigh, the back of your upper arms, or your buttocks. Stay two inches away from previous insulin injections or other shots. Stay two inches away from your belly button or from any scar. Do not use sites that are bruised, tender or swollen. Inject the insulin in different areas to prevent scars. The insulin will also absorb into your bloodstream better. Your insulin pen has a dial which you set to give the right amount of insulin. You can see the right amount through the dose window. 1. Collect all of your supplies. 2. Wash your hands. 3. Clean your skin with an alcohol pad. Let the area air dry. 4. Take the cover off the pen. The insulin is already in the pen. 5. If you are using cloudy insulin, gently roll the pen between your hands to mix the insulin. 6. Wipe off the end of the pen with where the needle will screw on with an alcohol pad. 7. Peel off the paper cover on the pen needle. Screw the needle onto the pen. 9. Turn the dose dial to 2 (units). 10. Hold the pen so the needle is pointing up. 11. Push in the dose button at the end of the pen to clear the air out of the pen. (See drawing, at right.) You should see a drop of insulin at the tip of the needle. You may need to repeat steps 9 through 11 until you see the drop of insulin. 12. Turn the dose dial to the number of units of insulin you will inject. 13. Lightly pinch and hold your skin at the site you will be giving your shot. Push the needle straight in. The needle should be all the way into your skin. 15. Let go of the pinch of skin. 16. Pull out the needle. 17. Unscrew the needle from the pen. Continue reading >>

Suitable Injection Sites

Suitable Injection Sites

Insulin is not absorbed at the same speed at all sites Abdomen and thighs are the most common injection sites.2 At least 1 cm distance from the navel for adults. At least 3 cm distance from the navel for children. Injection sites on the abdomen allow rapid insulin absorption. Injection sites on the thighs and buttocks allow slower insulin absorption for some insulins. The effect of analog insulins is less dependent on the injection site. Follow the recommendations given by your healthcare professional. Rotation principle for injection sites – Avoiding lipohypertrophy Change the injection site after every injection (rotation principle). For adults, the injection sites should be at least 1 cm away from each other to avoid frequent injections into so-called “favourite sites” and thus leading to tissue hardening (lipohypertrophy). Example 1 Example 2 Example 3 2 Upper arms as injection sites: injections into the upper arms should only be performed after training by your healthcare professional. The reason is a higher risk of injecting into the muscle as the subcutaneous fatty tissue is usually thin and injection sites are not easily accessible. Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection

Giving An Insulin Injection

Your health care provider or a certified diabetes educator (CDE) will teach you all of these steps, watch you practice, and answer your questions. You may take notes to remember the details. Know the name and dose of each medicine to give. The type of insulin should match the type of syringe: Standard insulin contains 100 units in 1 mL. This is also called U-100 insulin. Most insulin syringes are marked for giving you U-100 insulin. Every notch on a standard 1 mL insulin syringe is 1 unit of insulin. More concentrated insulins are now available. These include U-500 and U-300. Because U-500 syringes may be difficult to find, your provider may give you instructions for using U-500 insulin with U-100 syringes. Insulin syringes or concentrated insulin are now widely available. DO NOT mix or dilute their concentrated insulin with any other insulin. Some types of insulin can be mixed with each other in one syringe, but many cannot be mixed. Check with your provider or pharmacist about this. Other general tips: Always use the same brands and types of supplies. DO NOT use expired insulin. Insulin should be given at room temperature. If you had it in the refrigerator or cooler bag, take it out 30 minutes before the injection. Once you have started using a vial of insulin, it can be kept at room temperature for a month. Gather your supplies: insulin, needles, syringes, alcohol wipes, and a container for used needles and syringes. To fill a syringe with one type of insulin: Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin bottle label. Make sure it is the right insulin. Make sure it is not expired. The insulin should not have any clumps on the sides of the bottle. If it does, throw it out and get another bottle. Intermediate-acting insulin (N or NPH) is cloudy Continue reading >>

How To Give An Insulin Injection

How To Give An Insulin Injection

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW: What do I need to know about insulin syringes? Insulin syringes come in different sizes depending on the dose of insulin you need. Your healthcare provider or pharmacist will help you find the right size syringe. Use the correct size insulin syringe to make sure you get the right dose of insulin. Where do I inject insulin? You can inject insulin into your abdomen, upper arm, buttocks, hip, and the front or side of the thigh. Insulin works fastest when it is injected into the abdomen. Do not inject insulin into areas where you have a wound or bruising. Insulin injected into wounds or bruises may not get into your body correctly. Use a different area within the site each time you inject insulin. For example, inject insulin into different areas in your abdomen. Insulin injected into the same area can cause lumps, swelling, or thickened skin. How do I inject the insulin with a syringe? Clean the skin where you will inject the insulin. You can use an alcohol pad or a cotton swab dipped in alcohol. Grab a fold of your skin. Gently pinch the skin and fat between your thumb and first finger. Insert the needle straight into your skin. Do not hold the syringe at an angle. Make sure the needle is all the way into the skin. Let go of the pinched tissue. Push down on the plunger to inject the insulin. Press on the plunger until the insulin is gone. Keep the needle in place for 5 seconds after you inject the insulin. Pull out the needle. Press on your injection site for 5 to 10 seconds. Do not rub. This will keep insulin from leaking out. Throw away your used insulin syringe as directed. Do not recap the syringe before you throw it away. How can I decrease pain when I inject insulin? Inject insulin at room temperature. If the insulin has been stored in the refr Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Take Insulin

8 Ways To Take Insulin

How to take insulin Need insulin? While the drug itself may be old—nearly 90 years to be exact—there’s lots of new things happening when it comes to ways to take it. From the old-fashioned needle and syringe to injector pens to pumps, you’ve got choices to make. There’s even a plethora of devices that can help you inject if you have poor vision or mobility issues. Check out these eight options and talk with your certified diabetes educator to determine which insulin delivery system or injection aids are right for you. Needle and syringe With this type of delivery system, you insert a needle into a vial, draw up the appropriate amount of insulin, and then inject into the subcutaneous space—the tissue just under your skin. Here are 5 types of insulin and 9 factors that affect how insulin works. Even though there are other options, needles and syringes remain the most common way to take insulin. Some of the new insulin injection methods, such as the insulin pen, carry only a preset amount of insulin. Thinner needles and other advancements, such as syringe magnifiers, have made syringes easier to use. Syringe magnifier Have poor vision? You’re not alone. According to the American Diabetes Association, diabetes is the leading cause of new cases of blindness among adults aged 20–74 years. Needle guides can help you keep the syringe or pen steady at the desired location and at the correct angle both for drawing up insulin out of the vial and injecting. Some needle guides also come with magnifiers, which help by enlarging the numbers and allowing you to read the fine print and dosages on the syringe. Syringe-filling device These devices are another example of innovations designed to help make insulin needles more palatable. Syringe-filling devices allow a person Continue reading >>

All About Injections

All About Injections

A healthcare professional trained in injection techniques can teach you how to do it right The following recommendations apply to people with diabetes being treated with insulin injections or GLP-1 analogues (albiglutide (EperzanTM), dulaglutide (Trulicity®), exenatide (Byetta®), exenatide sustained release (Bydureon®) and liraglutide (Victoza®)). They are based on the Recommendations for Best Practice in Injection Technique (2015) from the Forum for Injection Technique (FIT). Preparing for injection Follow these important steps before an injection: Wash your hands and the injection site with soap and water, and dry well. If you use an alcohol swab (e.g.: in a hospital), let the skin dry completely before administering the injection. Check that the vial or cartridge has not passed its expiration date. Wipe the cartridge or vial with an alcohol swab. When using cloudy insulin, gently roll the cartridge, vial or pen device 10 times, then tip it (do not shake) 10 times. Finally, inspect it to ensure that the suspension has a consistently milky white appearance. Is a skin lift necessary? In adults, a skin lift is used in some situations, based on needle length and the amount of adipose (fat) tissue. A skin lift should be used when the needle is 8 mm or longer. In addition, in people whose arms and legs or abdomen have little fatty tissue, a skin fold might be justified when using a needle of 5 mm or 6 mm. A skinfold may not be necessary especially when using a 4 mm needle . A skin lift, if required, must be done properly to ensure that the medication is not injected into the muscle or not deeply enough. Injection areas In adults, the recommended injection areas are the following: abdomen thighs upper buttocks back of the upper arm (not a preferred area because of the di Continue reading >>

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

Choosing Best Body Site For An Insulin Shot

In the past, doctors and nurses told patients to rotate their insulin shots to different sites on their bodies. Now we know that it's best to take insulin shots in the part of the body that matches the insulin action a person wants. See Illustration: Sites for Injecting Insulin Injection Areas and Action Insulin enters the bloodstream faster from some areas of the body than from others. Where you take your shot can affect your blood sugar levels. Generally, insulin enters the blood: Fastest from the abdomen (stomach area). A little slower from the arms. Even more slowly from the legs. Slowest from the buttocks. Exercising can also speed up the amount of time it takes for the insulin to enter your blood. You can figure out where to take your shot based on how quickly or slowly you want the insulin to enter your bloodstream. For example, if you're going to be exercising, such as walking or doing any kind of lifting, you probably don't want to take your shot in your leg or arm. Exercising those areas quickens the amount of time it takes for the insulin to get into your blood stream. This can cause your blood sugar to drop suddenly during or right after you exercise. If you plan to eat right after taking your shot, you might use a site on your stomach. That way the insulin will be available faster to handle the rise in your blood sugar after the meal. Rotate Sites in the Same Area Follow these guidelines when you choose a site to take your shot. Try to be consistent in where you take your shots. Always take your shot of fast-acting insulin in the stomach or arm. Take slower-acting insulin in the leg or buttocks. Try to avoid using the exact spot you used for your last shot. For example, space your next shot just an inch or so from your last previous shot. If you use the sam Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Tweet Injecting insulin is an essential part of the daily regime for many diabetics. Although insulin that can be inhaled is now available and approved, the reality is that most type 1 diabetics (and type 2 diabetics who require insulin) will have to continue injecting insulin until it is more common. Does injecting insulin hurt? Needle technology for insulin injection has become much better in recent years, meaning that the injection process, although not pain-free, does not hurt as much as it used to. Many patients still find injecting insulin to manage their diabetes an unpleasant process, however. Is injecting insulin and having diabetes going to change my life? Unfortunately, having diabetes does lead to lifestyle complications. For insulin therapy to be effective, it is necessary to make certain lifestyle changes. These should include: eating healthily exercising regularly testing blood glucose regularly and following a strict insulin regimen Although adhering to all these changes does influence your daily routine, the benefits for diabetics are enormous. Into what part of my body should I inject insulin to best help my diabetes? The abdomen is the most common site for injecting insulin. For some people, this site is not suitable, and other sites must be used. These include the upper arms, the upper buttocks and the outside of the thigh. All of these sites are most effective because they have a layer of fat to absorb the insulin better. This process directly injects insulin into the subcutaneous tissue. These areas also have fewer nerve endings, meaning that they are the least painful areas in which to inject. Should I switch the site where I inject insulin? Your healthcare team should be able to help you to decided the best places to inject insulin, when you shou Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

What Really Happened In Memento?

What Really Happened In Memento?

Spoiler Alert! Short answer would be, as Carlos Rui Ribeiro said "We really don't get know what happened". I feel this is late answer for the question (judging from its Latest activity) but still I am going to write my interpretation of the movie as some part of my answer is not in existing ones. I am assuming you know basic story of memento (i.e. chronological sequence of events).I suggest you to have a look at this if you did not get the sequence (or you have forgotten) 1. "Remember Sammy Jankis" There are some black and white scenes where Leonard is talking on the phone with stranger(?). He is telling him about Sammy who, like Leonard, also had a short term memory loss. Lenny tells him about his profession before (apparent) murder of Lenny's wife. Leonard was an insurance claims investigator and that's when he came across Sammy Jankis. Sammy and his were supposedly in a minor car accident where he received short term memory loss. Leonard came in to evaluate him and at first thought Sammy was faking. Sammy's wife was also very confused of his new condition and found it hard to live with so she decided to evaluate Sammy as well. Sammy's wife was diabetic and needed an insulin shot everyday from Sammy. To see if Sammy was faking or not, she had him give her multiple insulin shots in one day. If he was faking, he would not give her multiple shots as it was a matter of her life. But, being legit (?), Sammy ends up unknowingly killing his wife and got placed in an asylum. 2. "Teddy - don't believe his lies" Let's have a look at what Teddy (John Edward Gammell) says in few last minutes of movie Leonard Shelby: He knew about Sammy, why would I tell him about fucking Sammy?! Teddy: You tell everybody about Sammy! Everybody who'll listen! "Remember Sammy Jankis?" "Remember Sam Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites

Insulin Injection Sites

Giving the injection Selecting the injection site There are 4 safe areas for insulin injections. Thighs: Top and outer areas only. Do not use the inner side or back of the thigh. Stay about 4 of the child’s finger widths away from the knee and groin. Upper arms: Fleshy area on the side and back of the arms. Avoid the muscle in the shoulder. Stay 3 to 4 finger widths away from the elbow. Abdomen: Right across the abdomen, from just below the ribcage to well below the belt line. Stay about 2 finger widths away from the navel. Buttocks: Fleshy area (i.e. pants pocket area). Insulin may be absorbed differently from one site than another. Absorption is most predictable when injections are given in the abdomen and buttocks. In general, insulin injected into the upper arms or thighs is not absorbed as predictably. Also, insulin injected over an exercising muscle may be absorbed more quickly. For that reason, it’s wise to avoid injecting into the arms or thighs of someone who’s planning heavy exercise involving these muscles. In other words, runners should avoid injecting into the thighs, rowers should avoid injecting into the arms, and so on. Injections are done in a pattern to avoid using exactly the same site over and over. Make sure that each injection is about 1 inch (2.5 cm) or 2 finger widths from the one done before. Try to work in straight, even rows about an inch apart. This way you’re more likely to remember where the last injection was given. Rotating injection sites Many people with diabetes, children especially, develop “favourite” injection sites where there seems to be less pain and injections seem easier. If the same small area is used many times, the fat tissue below the skin swells, a condition called lipohypertrophy. This creates large bumps that Continue reading >>

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