diabetestalk.net

When Will Smart Insulin Be Available

Smart Insulin Patch May Aid Future Therapies

Smart Insulin Patch May Aid Future Therapies

Smart insulin patch may aid future therapies January 18, 2018 by Natalie Hampton, North Carolina State University A smart insulin patch, once translated for humans, could eliminate the need for constant blood testing and help diabetics maintain a more consistent level of blood glucose. Yanqi Ye, a Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering , was home in China last year when her NC State professor, Zhen Gu, asked if she could present a paper at a conference there. It became an "ahha" moment for Ye, helping her to see what a difference her research project could have in the lives of diabetics. Ye talked about the research she has been working on in biomedical engineering: using a smart insulin patch to detect glucose levels and administer insulin in mice. Once translated for humans, it could eliminate the need for constant blood testing and help diabetics maintain a more consistent level of blood glucose. Though the project is still in animal trials, the idea impressed one man at the conference so much that he invited his diabetic father to come to the conference to meet Ye. "His dad has very serious diabeteslate stage diabetes. He suffered a lot from leg pain, one of the diabetic complications. His doctor forced him to inject the insulin, but he didn't like that," Ye said. The man's father wanted to know when the smart insulin patch might be ready for human use. Though human trials are still years away, meeting a person who would actually benefit from her research inspired Ye. The smart insulin patch that Ye is studying in mice combines the nanotechnology of tiny pyramid-shaped microneedles with pancreatic cells that detect glucose levels. The needles in the patcheach 800 micrometers long and thinner than a human hairpenetrate only the top layer of skin, making it painless Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

The Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State University was founded in 2003 to bring engineers and medical researchers together to solve pressing healthcare issues. Gu, an associate professor in the department, has been working with his colleagues to remedy the imperfections of current insulin delivery methods. In the healthy body, insulin secretion always quickly follows the blood sugar levels, says Gu. We want to mimic this process in a scientific way ourselves. Their solution is a glucose-responsive smart insulin patch that is worn on the skin and instantaneously releases insulin as needed. Roughly the same size as a dime, the patch contains 121 microneedles, each thinner than a human hair and pre-loaded with tiny packets of insulin and glucose oxidase, an enzyme that immediately responds to high glucose levels and sparks a reaction that releases insulin. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need this patch. But no one is perfect. Susan Spratt, associate professor of medicine at Duke University The on-demand actions of the insulin patches could help people with diabetes worry less about their glucose levels regardless of their activity levels and food intake while also increasing the accuracy of insulin dosing. Not only would the patch prevent high blood glucose, it also would reduce the chance of taking too much insulin, which can result in dangerously low blood glucose levels. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need th Continue reading >>

Synthetic “smart Gel” Provides Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery In Diabetic Mice

Synthetic “smart Gel” Provides Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery In Diabetic Mice

Although previous studies have attempted to create “electronics-free” insulin delivery systems using glucose oxidase and sugar-binding lectins as a glucose-sensing mechanism, no successful clinical translation has hitherto been made. These protein-based materials are intolerant of long-term use and storage because of their denaturing and/or cytotoxic properties. We provide a solution by designing a protein-free and totally synthetic material–based approach. Capitalizing on the sugar-responsive properties of boronic acid, we have established a synthetic polymer gel–based insulin delivery device confined within a single catheter, which exhibits an artificial pancreas–like function in vivo. Subcutaneous implantation of the device in healthy and diabetic mice establishes a closed-loop system composed of “continuous glucose sensing” and “skin layer”–regulated insulin release. As a result, glucose metabolism was controlled in response to interstitial glucose fluctuation under both insulin-deficient and insulin-resistant conditions with at least 3-week durability. Our “smart gel” technology could offer a user-friendly and remarkably economic (disposable) alternative to the current state of the art, thereby facilitating availability of effective insulin treatment not only to diabetic patients in developing countries but also to those patients who otherwise may not be strongly motivated, such as the elderly, infants, and patients in need of nursing care. Diabetes is a major global health threat that poses a devastating impact on society (1, 2). Among a growing lineup of medications for diabetes, insulin therapy continues to be a primary option in clinical practice for both palliative and preventive purposes (3). A number of studies have shown that tight g Continue reading >>

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

"Smart Insulin Patch" for Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials A "smart insulin patch" that could potentially dispel the need for painful insulin injections for millions of people worldwide with diabetes has been developed by a team at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and North Carolina State University. It employs painless microneedles to sense the low oxygen environment created when glucose levels rise and then delivers insulin as required. This is the first approach adopting this strategy of sensing low oxygen levels; other similar nanoparticle technologies in development rely instead on detecting changes in pH. However, the patch has so far only been tested in murine models of type 1 diabetes; a study detailing the findings in mice was published online on June 22, 2015 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "We are now moving toward preclinical, minipig-based studies before moving to clinical trials," said senior author Dr Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the joint UNC/NC State department of biomedical engineering. "If successful, we will test the patch on humans. It would take several years, most likely around 3 to 4 years, until potential clinical trials." "If we can get these patches to work in people, it will be a game changer," said John Buse, MD, PhD, another author, in a press release. Dr Buse is director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center and past president of the American Diabetes Association. Asked to comment, Richard Elliott, MD, research communications manager at Diabetes UK, said: "Alongside the insulin pumps that are already widely available, this 'smart patch' is one of a number of experimental approaches that are hoping to eliminate, or at least reduce, the need for insulin injections to manage diabetes effectively." But "significant Continue reading >>

Why A Smart Insulin Pen Is A Smart Idea

Why A Smart Insulin Pen Is A Smart Idea

Technology has come a long way. Without it, we wouldnt have the Internet, smartphones, or streaming TV. We wouldnt be able to ask our personal assistants Alexa, Siri, or Cortana what the weather will be like or who won the World Series in 1970. In terms of health care, technology has brought us electronic medical records , remote monitoring tools, cyberknives, and 3D-printed prosthetic limbs. Technology is has made its mark in the diabetes world, too. Meters, insulin pumps, and continuous glucose monitors continue to evolve. Smartphone apps allow you to track your blood sugars and share them with your health-care team. The bionic pancreas has made its debut and trials are currently under way. And even insulin pens are getting a tech makeover. The first insulin pen to hit the market was the NovoPen, made by Novo Nordisk, way back in 1985. Insulin pens have changed the lives of millions of people who have diabetes. Theyre preloaded with insulin, theyre simple to use, many of them are disposable, and theyre convenient. Pens have been a boon for people who are frequently on the go and for people who are visually impaired or who have difficulty drawing up insulin using vials and syringes. And like all medical devices, insulin pens are starting to become more sophisticated. Smarter insulin pens have been on the scene for a few years. In 2007, Lilly came out with their HumaPen Memoir, which is a pen that has a memory and records the date, time, and amount of the last 16 insulin doses. Novo Nordisk launched their own memory pen, the NovoPen Echo, in 2014. This pen also has a memory function and allows for half-unit insulin dosing. Then, in 2011, the Timesulin insulin pen cap became available in the U.S. This cap fits on an insulin pen (Novo Nordisks FlexPens, Lilly KwikPens, a Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin: The One-shot Wonder

Smart Insulin: The One-shot Wonder

One shot of insulin a day will hopefully become the future of diabetes care sometime soon. Researchers are always pushing the envelope when it comes to finding a cure for diabetes; functional or curative therapies such as Smart Insulin have peaked the interest of the masses, holding hopes that Smart Insulin will live up to its name. Smart Insulin is incredible to think about I can hardly imagine daily life in which a single injection of Smart Insulin a day would be the extent of intervention needed to manage diabetes. Once injected, this insulin is formulated to control the rest, matching insulin output to blood sugar levels. If everything goes according to plan, pending human trials and approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), it will equate to massive changes in the way we approach the delicate balancing act associated with both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Does this mean we can empty our purses, glove boxes and drawers of diabetes mechanical management tools like glucose meters, batteries, insulin pumps, continuous glucose monitors, and all of those juice boxes and glucose tabs? Yes. The ultimate goal of Smart Insulin is to dramatically improve our quality of life and longevity with this disease. The most basic explanation of Smart insulin or L-490 is that it essentially turns on when its needed and turns off when it isnt, giving credence to its name. Smart Insulin dates back to 1999 with a young Ph.D. student by the name of Todd Zion at the Massachusetts Institutes of Technology (MIT). With success in hand, having won an entrepreneurial award for his work, he started a company in 2003 called SmartCells. Zion cashed in on his unique treatment approach when pharmaceutical giant Merck acquired SmartCells for more than half of a billion dollars in 2010 a Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin

Smart Insulin

Glucose responsive insulin (GRI), known as 'smart' insulin, is a promising treatment option Glucose responsive insulin (GRI), known as 'smart' insulin, is a promising treatment option for people with diabetes that, if successful, could result in blood glucose levels remaining within range during the day, and no more worrying about low or high blood sugar. Scientists worldwide are working on administering smart insulin in different forms, such as capsules and patches. But the research is in its infancy - in many cases, human testing of smart insulin is not scheduled for several years. GRI works in the body by automatically reacting to blood sugar fluctuations, essentially the same as normal insulin-producing cells in people without diabetes. GRI would therefore take the hassle out of consistently managing blood sugar levels and also enable tighter blood glucose control. If smart insulin ultimately proves successful, it could be revolutionary for treating diabetes. Smart insulin is a next-generation insulin that automatically responds to changing blood glucose levels. The lower or higher blood sugar levels are, less or more insulin is released, respectively. The insulin, whether taken as an injection or pill, keeps blood glucose levels normal throughout the day. This eliminates not just hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also multiple daily injections and carb counting. All smart insulin projects are at a very early stage and, in some cases, the drug is still being tested in animal studies. One of the earliest smart insulin projects began back in 2003 when Todd Zion, an MIT researcher, founded a company called SmartCells Inc, which soon gained backing from JDRF as it sought to develop GRI. In 2011 US pharmaceutical company Merck acquired SmartCells. Their MK-2640 insulin Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Or Glucose-responsive Insulin - Jdrf Research Projects

Smart Insulin Or Glucose-responsive Insulin - Jdrf Research Projects

Smart insulins or glucose-responsive insulins are being designed to only turn on when they're needed and off when they're not. These insulins could make hypos history and help ensure perfect glucose control throughout any given day. A person with type 1 diabetes would take an injection, or perhaps even a pill, of one of these insulins enough to cover the needs of a day and the smart insulin would circulate in the body, inactive, until blood glucose levels start to rise. As glucose levels rise, the insulin would go to work to bring these levels back down. Smart insulins like this will turn on and off when needed One concept of how this will work is shown in this diagram. When blood glucose levels are low, a binding element (represented by the green spheres) stays attached to the insulin (orange lines), preventing it from working. As blood glucose levels rise, glucose molecules (grey hexagons) help to free the insulin from the binding element, allowing the insulin to go to work, which will bring glucose levels back down. Finally, as glucose levels return to normal, the release of insulin stops until it is needed again. In other words, a smart insulin would automatically activate or deactivate in response to changing glucose levels in the blood, thus giving tighter control essentially as if the beta cells were working normally. Although this research is at an early stage, at JDRF we believe this idea could be utterly transformative for people with type 1. At a stroke, an effective smart insulin could offer tight glucose control, eliminate hypos, prevent complications and free people from glucose monitoring. What role has JDRF played in the development of smart insulins? A chemical engineer at MIT, Todd Zion, began to experiment during his doctorate with chemically modifyi Continue reading >>

Dq Helps Fund Smart Insulin Breakthrough

Dq Helps Fund Smart Insulin Breakthrough

Diabetes Australia funding for a matchstick-sized nano-implantthat could remove the need for daily insulin injections has helpedachieve a major step forward in diabetes research. In 12 months at the Australian Institute for Bioengineering andNanotechnology at the University of Queensland, researcher Dr ChunXu has proved the concept of nanoparticle "smart" insulin deliveryin mice, which means if blood glucose levels (BGLs) are high,insulin will be released. If BGLs are in the normal range, insulinis not released. This achievement is one of the most prospective lines ofdiabetes research internationally in the push to effect a lastingand simple treatment for the condition. It puts not onlyQueensland, but Australia, at the forefront of nanoparticleresearch, which will have applications across many fields ofmedicine. "In our test, one injection using this nanoparticle technologycan give diabetic mice about 3.5 days where blood glucose levelsstay in the normal range. A pure insulin injection only lasts forseveral hours," Dr Xu said. "By comparing the blood glucose levels of mice without diabetes,we have proved that the nanoparticle formulation showed minimizedinsulin release and the BGLs remained in the normal range." Project leader Professor Chengzhong (Michael) Yu sums up theachievement: "Yes, we have developed a smart insulin releasesystem, depending on the blood glucose concentration. It does thejob to bring high BGLs back to normal only in diabeticconditions. "When the BGLs are in the normal range, insulin will be releasedonly in a very small amount, without causing hypoglycemia [or lowBGLs]." Prof Yu (pictured at the University of Queensland recently withDr Xu) said this was achieved because the outside of thenanoparticle is coated with enzymes and polymer that act as Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Ready For Human Trials

Smart Insulin Ready For Human Trials

Smart Insulin Ready for Human Trials During a recent investor briefing Merck announced that their smart insulin product is ready to progress from animal to human testing. This news generated some buzz in the type 1 community, especially after the JDRF released a breaking news email congratulating the accomplishment. Below, the JDCA weighs in with a practical perspective on questions and challenges that face Mercks development of smart insulin. Smart insulin (a.k.a. glucose-responsive insulin or self-dosing insulin) promises to release insulin in response to changes in blood glucose. As currently envisioned, smart insulin would require only one injection a day. The insulin is combined with another molecule that would prevent it from being activated until glucose levels rise to a certain level. As blood glucose returns to a normal range, the release of insulin would stop until needed again. As a result, smart insulin would effectively reduce the incidence of hyperglycemia. The Merck project appears to be the most advanced smart insulin initiative in development. It began as SmartCells, Inc., a 14-person company founded by an entrepreneurial MIT professor in 2003. In 2008 JDRF gave $1 million to fund SmartCells work on smart insulin. In 2010 Merck acquired the firm for $500 million. The high acquisition price suggests that Merck envisions smart insulin as a therapy primarily for type 2 diabetes and secondarily for the smaller type 1 marketplaces. But several major questions still need to be answered as the research progresses, including: Speed at which the insulin would begin to control glucose after a release is triggered. Faster is better. Its ability to eliminate hypoglycemia with a high degree of confidence. As currently conceived, Smart Insulin should reduce low bloo Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin: Amazingbut Still At Least A Decade Away

Smart Insulin: Amazingbut Still At Least A Decade Away

Smart Insulin: AmazingBut Still At Least a Decade Away Smart insulin, meaning, insulin that has the ability to circulate and release only when it encounters glucose in the bloodstream is still at least 10 years away. One of the most challenging aspects of type 1 diabetes is giving insulin on time, in the right dose, and then dealing with the aftermath of possible too little or too much insulin. So the idea of smart insulin, which would be injected maybe once a day or week and then just automatically work according to the glucose found in the bloodstream, would be life changing. One day smart insulin may beable to keep blood sugar levels stable without the constant need to check and then inject or dose insulin with a pump. The BBC ran an article covering Dr. John Fossey and his team in Birmingham, United Kingdom and their work on the idea of smart insulin. An international diabetes charity just provided funding to Fossey and team who have been relying on chemistry to make smart insulin possible. Theyve created a special gel that dissolves only when in the presence of glucose. The BBC reports that the researchers intend to try to somehow combine that gel with insulin so that as blood sugar levels rise, the gel dissolves to get the insulin in their bloodstream where they would otherwise inject it. How Would This Help Manage Blood Sugar Levels? If this were to work as intended, blood sugar levels would be better managed by the automatic delivery of insulin instead of waiting until blood sugar is checked and insulin is given. It isnt unusual for a person with type 1 diabetes to check blood sugar, see a 200 mg/dL for example, work out how much insulin they need, and then inject the insulin and wait a given amount of time before having that blood sugar come down to a preferre Continue reading >>

Will Smart Insulin Pens Hit Pharmacy Shelves Soon?

Will Smart Insulin Pens Hit Pharmacy Shelves Soon?

Will Smart Insulin Pens Hit Pharmacy Shelves Soon? Thinking beyond the pill is becoming the new mantra for Big Pharma. In an industry that has been plagued by many drugs going generic and most prominent blockbuster drugs being relegated to the specialty market, finding a new niche has been a focus. Digital health has become increasingly attractive to pharma as a means of not only finding new areas for therapeutic investigations but also as a way to tie in drugs to "one-up" competitors with a more versatile product. This could be anything from an application to increase adherence to therapy to a service meant to treat the disease more holistically. Case in point: Eli Lilly is starting research on a new project whereby it is creating a closed-loop system for diabetes management. So how does this work? Essentially, the future of diabetes management with insulin will not be standalone pumps or pens but rather devices that are integrated together with real-time data analytics to administer insulin at the right dose and right time. So how does this all work? Eli Lilly is calling it the automated insulin delivery (AID) system, which it detailed in a statement as "a hybrid closed-loop platform that uses connected devices -- an insulin pump with a dedicated controller, dosing algorithm, and continuous glucose monitor -- to automate insulin dosing. These components are designed to work together to automatically adjust insulin infusion rates to maintain blood sugar levels within a specified target range."1 This will be part of the Connected Diabetes Ecosystem, which will first need to demonstrate safety and functionality in a phase I study. What is interesting is that in another part of the statement, Eli Lilly said, "The AID system is one of 2 platforms in development for the Ec Continue reading >>

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be a Game Changer The smart insulin patch. The lab of Zhen Gu, Ph.D. For many who suffer from diabetes, insulin injections can be a painful and imprecise process of keeping their blood sugar levels under control. A new smart insulin patch could do away with these painful injections and revolutionize the way diabetics keep their blood sugar levels in check. The patch, created by researchers from the University of North Carolina and NC State, is a thin square covered with more than 100 tiny needles.According to researchers, the patch works fast, is simple to use and is made from biocompatible materials.The patchs tiny, painless needles are packed with insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes in microscopic storage units. The patch is able to release these enzymes when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , showed promising results in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Researchers hope to see similar success in subsequent clinical trials in humans. Around 387 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. These patients keep their blood sugar in check by monitoring their levels with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. If the wrong amount of medication is injected, patients could suffer from severe complications. "The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic's weight and sensitivity to insulin," said co-senior author Zhen Guin a statement, "so we could make the smart patch even smarter." The study found that the patch lowered blood glucose in mice for up to nine hours. As mice are less sensitive to insulin than humans, researchers suggest the patch can have a longer-lasting effect in diabetic patients. The patch emulates beta cells, which generate and Continue reading >>

'smart' Glucose-responsive Insulin Making Progress

'smart' Glucose-responsive Insulin Making Progress

'Smart' Glucose-Responsive Insulin Making Progress 'Smart' Glucose-Responsive Insulin Making Progress Email addresses will not be shared with 3rd parties. See privacy policy We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. The race to develop a smart insulin that actually reacts to changing blood sugars has heated up once again, with two big players now contributing millions towards creating this glucose-responsive insulin that could relieve us PWDs of all the calculation, guesswork, and correcting required when our sugars spike. Wow! On Feb. 25, news broke that JDRF and Sanofi had expanded their partnership to provide as much as $4.6 million toward research projects aimed at creating smart insulin. The collaborative group reviewed more than a dozen applications for R&D focused on this, and four were chosen to receive the funding over the next three years: Dr. Danny Chou, assistant professor of biochemistry atthe University of Utah, who's been developing an insulin formulation that has a biochemical trigger or "switch" that only works when it's activated by glucose in the system. This has been tested on diabetic mice, delivered by syringe and dermal adhesive strip. (More info at this USTAR news release .) Dr. Alborz Mahdavi, a chemical and biomolecular engineer who founded California-based ProtomerTechnologies that's focused on using "bio-inspired" approaches to allow blood sugarlevels to be sensed and used to activate a smart insulin. Basically, as we've heard Dr. Mahdavi describe it, his approach is similar to a light switch that can be turned on and off. Dr. Christoph Hagemeyer, ananobiotechnology professor from Monash University in Australia, whose work in diabete Continue reading >>

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

Categories: Diabetes Care Diabetes Research Besides using a glucometer or one of the new technologies proposed in the past for checking blood glucose levels, the newly developed smart insulin patch may be the perfect solution to replace pricking altogether. Although Lucas Research is not participating in this study, this new method of monitoring through a self-adhesive patch is close to release. The Innovative Smart Insulin Patch- Development The UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State Biomedical Engineering Program has jointly began development of a new diabetes monitoring solution. The university has created smart insulin patches. Zhen Gu leads this team of engineers and has founded a company in Research Triangle Park. The company is called Zenomics Inc. Thanks to Chinas MicroPort Scientific contribution of $5.8 million new diabetes research and testing is happening. The patch replaces inconvenient, uncomfortable injections and pumps. Current insulin delivery methods are not ideal. Right now, they pose painful and time-consuming scheduling. The smart patch will enhance the health and quality of life for people living with diabetes. The proposed patch will be responsive to insulin levels. Diabetics will wear the dime sized smart insulin patch on their skin. Wear the patch on any part of the body. You can easily hide it under clothing. Throughout the day, the patch monitors blood sugar levels. The patch will release insulin as needed. Read the levels through the 121 microneedles in each patch. The microneedles are not painful. Thinner than a human hair, each one has packets of insulin preloaded in them. Not only does each microneedle contain insulin, it also includes glucose oxidase. Thats an enzyme that treats high glucose levels. It will sense when levels are too high and imm Continue reading >>

More in insulin