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What Size Needle Is On An Insulin Syringe?

The Benefits Of Injecting Steroids With Insulin Syringes

The Benefits Of Injecting Steroids With Insulin Syringes

If you are a steroid user, the chances are that you’ve been taught to use 23 guage or 25 guage needles for intramuscular injections of anabolic steroids. After all, this is what athletes and bodybuilders have been doing for decades. Furthermore, medical school and medical professionals all recommend and use either 21g to 23g and 1 to 1-1/2 inch long needles for intramuscular injections. Why would anyone consider doing anything differently? What if there was a better and more optimal way to inject steroids? Are 21g and 23g needles the best size for steroid injections? It certainly is a tried, tested and convenient method preferred by nurses and doctors. But sometimes the procedures used by medical professionals represent what is the most convenient and quickest method and NOT necessarily what is optimal for the patient. Medical professionals would much prefer to use a procedure that requires only 3 seconds over one that requires 30 seconds even if a gradual injection is better for the patient. And since most patients may have a high body fat percentage that requires the use of a long 1-inch or 1-1/2 inch needle, doctors will use the long needle even in cases when the patient has a low bodyfat and a shorter needle would suffice. Doctors tend to subscribe to the one-size-fits-all approach that works best for them and not necessarily best for their patient. In most cases, bodybuilders who inject steroids would benefit from using smaller insulin syringes. These syringes are typically 29 guage and ½ inch long. The use of smaller needle sizes is much easier on the muscle tissue. Larger needles cause more muscle trauma and are much more likely to cause scar tissue especially with repeated injections over time. Furthermore, the slower injection speed (30+ seconds) that comes Continue reading >>

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

The Appropriateness Of The Length Of Insulin Needles Based On Determination Of Skin And Subcutaneous Fat Thickness In The Abdomen And Upper Arm In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Appropriateness Of The Length Of Insulin Needles Based On Determination Of Skin And Subcutaneous Fat Thickness In The Abdomen And Upper Arm In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Longer needle and complicated insulin injection technique such as injecting at a 45-degree angle and making skinfolds may decrease patient compliance to insulin injection therapy. In this light, shorter insulin needles have been recently developed. However, it is necessary to ascertain that such shorter needles are appropriate for Korean patients with diabetes as well. First, the diverse demographic and diabetic features of 156 Korean adults with diabetes were collected by a questionnaire and a device unit of body fat measurement. The skin and subcutaneous fat thicknesses of each subject were measured by Ultrasound device with a 7- to 12-MHz probe. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Results The mean skin thickness was 2.29±0.37 mm in the abdomen and 2.00±0.34 mm in the upper arms, and the mean subcutaneous fat thickness was to 10.15±6.54 mm in the abdomen and 5.50±2.68 mm in the upper arms. Our analysis showed that the factors affecting the skin thickness of the abdomen and upper arms were gender and body mass index (BMI), whereas the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the abdomen were gender and BMI, and the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the upper arms were gender, BMI, and age. Insulin fluids may not appear to be intradermally injected into the abdomen and upper arms at any needle lengths. The risk of intramuscular injection is likely to increase with longer insulin needles and lower BMI. It is recommended to fully inform the patients about the lengths of needles for insulin injections. As for the recommended needle length, the findings of this study indicate that needles as short as 4 mm are sufficient to deliver insulin for Korean patients with diabetes. Keyword Continue reading >>

Insulin Syringes

Insulin Syringes

An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel, and a plunger. The needle is short and thin and covered with a fine layer of silicone to allow it to pass through the skin easily and lessen pain. A cap covers and protects the needle before it is used. The barrel is the long, thin chamber that holds the insulin. The barrel is marked with lines to measure the number of insulin units. The plunger is a long, thin rod that fits snugly inside the barrel of the syringe. It easily slides up and down to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. The plunger has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent leakage. The rubber seal is matched with the line on the barrel to measure the correct amount of insulin. Insulin syringes are made in several sizes. Syringe size and units Syringe size Number of units the syringe holds 1/4 mL or 0.25 mL 25 1/3 mL or 0.33 mL 30 1/2 mL or 0.50 mL 50 1 mL 100 Use the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. The measuring lines on the barrel of small syringes are farther apart and easier to see. When you choose the size of syringe, consider the number of units you need to give and how well you can see the markings on the barrel. A 0.25 mL or 0.33 mL syringe usually is best for children (who often need very small doses of insulin) and for people with poor eyesight. A 1 mL syringe may be best for an adult who needs to take a large amount of insulin. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

When it comes to diabetes therapy, insulin is pharmacists’ most valuable weapon. Although oral therapies can offer convenience and reduce hypoglycemia risk, the glucose-lowering effects of insulin remain unrivaled. Simply put, insulin is diabetic hormone replacement therapy. Patients with hypothyroidism receive levothyroxine, while patients no longer making sufficient insulin can replace it exogenously. Unfortunately, patients may resist starting insulin for many reasons, one of which is a fear of needles. Injecting insulin can be painful, especially when using longer needles. Painful injections are not only unpleasant for patients, but can also lead to medication noncompliance and poorer health outcomes. Although longer needles are often prescribed for patients with increased body fat, this practice actually has no clinical basis. Insulin is meant to be injected into subcutaneous tissue, human skin is only 1.6 mm to 2.4 mm thick, on average. Because skin thickness doesn’t increase significantly in overweight and obese patients, a 4-mm needle is sufficient to deliver insulin to subcutaneous tissue in patients of all sizes. Furthermore, choosing longer needles can negatively impact therapy in thinner patients. If patients inject insulin intramuscularly because their needle is too long, the drug’s absorption will be accelerated, while it’s duration of action will be shortened. Initiating insulin is often a significant lifestyle change for patients. Pharmacists can play a substantial role in helping patients overcome their fear of injection. For example, providing demonstrations and patient counseling about insulin—along with assuring patients that short-length, small-gauge needles can be used—can go a long way in promoting insulin acceptance and adherence. ◄ Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Needles

Insulin Pen Needles

Tweet Insulin pen needles and disposable syringes come in a variety of lengths and widths to suit all body types. Needles used to be long and sharp, but due to evolutions in technology, needles are now small, thin and quite often pain-free. From 12mm to 4mm, the needle length you choose is likely to be dictated by your size. Children will likely benefit from the shorter 6mm size. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on which is best your body shape. When it comes to injecting, it is essential to get the right kit and use the right technique to reduce any pain. Hence, be careful not to fall into sloppy habits, such as failing to rotate your insulin injection sites as this might lead to irritation and soreness. Insulin needle guides Read product guides from Sue Marshall with user reviews for insulin needles and accessories. You can buy pens, needles and accessories from the Diabetes Shop. Use needles correctly Make sure that along with rotating injection sites, you follow these rules for using needles correctly. Use new needles either for every injection or at least change them once a day. Do not inject through clothing (or only very rarely). If you’re an ‘old hand’ at injecting, you might benefit from a quick refresher on how to inject to make sure you’re doing it correctly. Needles ranges fit on most insulin pens Most needle ranges fit on most insulin injection pens, including all Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly pens (Novopens and Humapens) as well as the Autopen range from Owen Mumford. All of these needles are available on prescription. Gauges and needle length The measurements of needles relate to how long the needle is. When a needles measurement is 31G, the G (or g) refers to the gauge of the needle. This donates the thickness, size, or capacity. Th Continue reading >>

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

How To Read An Insulin Syringe

As with all medicine, it is important to take the right dose each time ​ ​​Injecting yourself with the right dose of insulin is very important. This is why you need to know how to read a syringe. ​ Parts of an Insulin Syringe An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel and a plunger. The needle is short and thin. It is made of a special material that allows the needle to slide through the skin easily with less pain. It comes with a cap to cover and protect it before it is used. The barrel is the plastic chamber that holds the insulin. It is marked with lines (calibrations) on the side. The lines show you how many units of insulin you are injecting. The plunger is the long thin rod that slides up and down the inside of the barrel. Its function is to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. It has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent insulin from leaking out. The rubber seal is fitted in such a way that it matches the line on the barrel. Syringes are meant for one-time use. Once used, they must be thrown away in special puncture-proof containers. How to Know What Syringe Size to Choose Insulin syringes come in different sizes. Syringe Size Number of Units the Syringe Holds 0.25 ml 25 0.30 ml 30 0.50 ml 50 1.00 ml 100 The larger the syringe size, the more insulin it can hold. When choosing the size of a syringe, consider: the number of units of insulin you need, and how well you can see the line markings on the barrel. Go for the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. This is because the lines on the barrel of small syringes are further apart and easier to see. How to Read a Syringe When measuring the amount of insulin, read from the top ring (needle side), and not the Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

I have been injecting insulin for two years. My question is about needle length. I’ve used a U-100 31-gauge, 8-mm “short” needle because—well, it should hurt less, right? Because I am slightly obese, should I use the 29-gauge, 12.7-mm needle instead? Continue reading >>

Syringe Capacity And Dose Scale

Syringe Capacity And Dose Scale

Left to right: 3/10 cc syringe with half-unit markings 3/10 cc syringe with whole unit markings 1/2 cc syringe 1 cc syringe BD insulin syringes are available in these sizes: If your dose is… Use this capacity syringe 30 units or less, measured in whole or half-units 3/10 cc/mL (30 units) with half-unit markings 31 to 50 units 1/2 cc/mL (50 units) 51 to 100 units 1 cc/mL (100 units) Choose the smallest syringe that's big enough to hold the largest dose you take in a day. The smaller the syringe, the easier it is to read the markings and draw up an accurate dose. If your largest dose is close to the syringe's maximum capacity, you might want to buy the next size up to handle any increases in your dose adjustments. For example, if your dosage is 29 units and you buy a 3/10 cc/mL syringe, you won't be able to use those syringes if your doctor increases your dosage to 31 units. BD 3/10 cc/mL syringes are available with dosage markings at every half-unit. People who take very small doses (such as children) and who are told to measure their doses in half units (such as 2 ½ units or 5 ½ units) should use the BD syringe with dosage markings at every half unis Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Two Needle Sizes For Subcutaneous Administration Of Enoxaparin: Effects On Size Of Hematomas And Pain On Injection.

Comparison Of Two Needle Sizes For Subcutaneous Administration Of Enoxaparin: Effects On Size Of Hematomas And Pain On Injection.

Abstract STUDY OBJECTIVE: To determine whether use of a smaller needle size for subcutaneous injection of enoxaparin would reduce the size of injection-site hematomas and/or decrease the pain of injection. DESIGN: Prospective, randomized trial. SETTING: Community hospital in North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. PATIENTS: One hundred twenty-four patients with unstable angina or non-Q-wave myocardial infarction who were administered enoxaparin for anticoagulation. INTERVENTION: Each patient was randomly assigned to one of two groups. One group received enoxaparin injections with a 30-gauge, 5/16-inch insulin syringe, and the other group was injected with a 26-gauge, 3/8-inch tuberculin syringe. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Participating nurses used standard measuring tape to determine the largest diameter of each hematoma. Pain was assessed with a 10-unit numeric scale. The two groups did not differ significantly with regard to either the mean size of the largest hematoma/patient (4.2 cm in the insulin-syringe group vs 3.8 cm in the tuberculin-syringe group, p=0.68) or the mean pain score (0.3 in the insulin-syringe group vs 0.5 in the tuberculin-syringe group, p=0.10). CONCLUSIONS: Use of a 30-gauge, 5/16-inch insulin syringe instead of a 26-gauge, 3/8-inch tuberculin syringe does not significantly reduce either hematoma size or pain of injection. A larger study is required to determine whether needle size affects the frequency of hematoma formation. Continue reading >>

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

Insulin syringes come in several sizes. When buying syringes, keep these things in mind: Needle gauge: The gauge of the needle means its width, or thickness. Insulin syringes range from 28 gauge to 31 gauge, and the larger the number the smaller the gauge. (An Ultra-Fine II brand needle is the smallest, and the Ultra-Fine is the next size up.) Smaller, thinner children may do well with the smaller gauge needle. Some older and larger children may prefer the larger needle. Needle length. Common needle lengths are 12.7 mm (1/2") and 8 mm (5/16"). The 8-mm needle is called "short" and is the length that most people prefer. Barrel size: The barrel size determines how much insulin the syringe can hold. Buy a barrel size that best matches your standard insulin dosage. For example, a 3/10-cc syringe is best for 30 units or less, 1/2-cc syringe is best for 30 to 50 units, and a 1-cc syringe is best for injections of 50 to 100 units. To make sure you have the size you need, always check the box before you leave the pharmacy. When you draw up insulin, look closely at the markings on the barrel, especially whenever you change syringe sizes. The markings will be different, and you need to make sure you're drawing up the right dose. Continue reading >>

Insulin Syringes & Needles

Insulin Syringes & Needles

Insulin injections have come a long way since they were first used to treat diabetes. There are not only different types of insulin to meet each user’s individual needs, but also different ways to inject insulin. Sites for insulin injection include the abdomen, the thigh, the arm and the buttocks. Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject, so it’s best to consistently rotate within the same part of the body for each of your daily injections. The fastest absorption is at the abdomen (where most people usually inject their insulin and hence is the preferred site), followed by the arm, the thigh and the buttocks. For injection into the abdomen area, stay at least two inches away from the belly button or any scars you may already have. Injecting in the same place most of the time can cause hard lumps or extra fat deposits to develop. These lumps are not only unsightly, they can also change the way insulin is absorbed, making it more difficult to keep your blood sugar on target. When rotating sites within one injection area, keep the injections points about an inch (or two finger - widths) apart. Do not inject into scar tissue or areas with broken vessels or varicose veins. Scar tissue may interfere with absorption. Insulin syringes come in different capacities of 3/10cc, 1/2cc and 1cc. Choose the smallest syringe that is big enough to hold the largest dose you inject each time. The smaller the syringe, the easier it is to read the markings and draw up an accurate dose. If your largest dose is close to the syringe’s maximum capacity, you may want to buy the next size up to handle any increases in your dose adjustments. Needle size for both syringes and insulin pens refers to both the length and gauge of the needle. Other points to note: 1 Ke Continue reading >>

Ready, Aim, Inject!

Ready, Aim, Inject!

All About Needles and Syringes Insulin and other injectable drugs are important tools for the management of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Insulin is, of course, required for the treatment of Type 1 diabetes, and it is often needed to treat Type 2 diabetes when oral drugs and lifestyle measures no longer adequately control blood glucose levels. Even if you don’t currently take insulin, there’s a decent chance that you will in the future. Many people are understandably uneasy about the idea of giving themselves injections. Learning more about how insulin injections work, however, usually helps alleviate some fears and concerns. Even if you already take insulin and aren’t experiencing any problems, you may be able to make the process more comfortable or convenient — and head off future problems — by learning more about the process. This article provides an overview of the tools and techniques for giving insulin injections. Pens versus syringes Currently, the only way insulin can be delivered to the body is by injection, using either a syringe or an insulin pen, by infusion, using an insulin pump, or via inhalation (not discussed in this article). While there are companies working to develop forms of insulin that can be taken as a pill, none of these products are currently available to consumers. For decades, a syringe was the only option for injection, until 1985 when the NovoPen was introduced by the company that is now Novo Nordisk. Insulin pens allow users to “dial in” an insulin dose for injection, a process that is generally much faster than measuring a dose with a vial and syringe. The majority of pens are prefilled with insulins and are disposable, with a few available that have replaceable cartridges. Unlike insulin syringes, which come with a fixe Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

If you or someone you know has diabetes, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are living with it. And of those, about 15% use medicine that’s injected. Vials and syringes used to be the most common way to inject. But today, many injectable diabetes medicines come in prescription pens, also called prefilled pens. Here, we will focus on the needles that are used with those pens. Choosing a pen needle Today's pen needles are designed to fit most prefilled pens. But, there are other things to consider when choosing a pen needle. Talk with your health care provider; together you can decide which needle works best for you. To learn more about Novo Nordisk’s line of needles and to find the pen needle that’s right for you, click here. Today’s needles are shorter and thinner People who have never self-injected may have concerns about doing so and that’s understandable. But pen needles have come a long way from the ones first launched in 1985. Since then, injection comfort has driven needle technology, making the needles used today shorter and thinner than the ones used in the past. Understanding needle size Pen needles come in all different sizes. The size of a needle is indicated by 2 factors—length and gauge (G): Needle length is measured in millimeters. Lengths range anywhere from 12.7 mm to 4 mm, the shortest insulin pen needle currently available Understanding gauge can be a little tricky. The gauge of a needle refers to its thickness. You would think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, a 32G needle is thinner than a 27G needle Always use a new needle for each injection You run the risk of infection from reusing needles. The more you reuse a needle, t Continue reading >>

How To Determine The Correct Syringe For Your Pet’s Insulin

How To Determine The Correct Syringe For Your Pet’s Insulin

A syringe is a syringe, right? Actually, syringes come in different units of measure, different sizes, different needle length, different needle width, different, different, different! Giving insulin to a pet, especially if you’ve never done that before, is stressful enough without having to worry about giving the wrong dose. Unfortunately the body of an animal (or a human) is not so willing to forgive an insulin overdose. Hypoglycemia can and frequently does become life-threatening. Let’s start with the volume that the syringe holds inside of it: Syringes can hold 1/2 cc, 1 cc, or 3/10 of a cc (total volume of insulin). These syringes have markings of UNITS on them also. Insulin comes as 40 units and 100 units, meaning; 40 units per 1cc OR 100 units per 1cc 20 units per 1/2 cc OR 50 units per 1/2 cc 10 units per 1/4 cc OR 25 units per 1/4 cc (Keep in mind that 1cc = 1 ml) This number of UNITS that the insulin is marked for is essential for the syringe to draw up the correct quantity of insulin. Insulin U40 must be used in U40 syringes. U100 insulin needs to be used in U100 syringes. You might be thinking, “Okay I picked the right syringe for my insulin, now I’m being asked about the CCs! How do I know that?” Before you buy any insulin it’s important to know how much insulin you need to give. Let’s say you’re using U40 insulin and you need to give 10 units to your pet. Since U40 means 40 units per 1cc, then 10 units would mean 1/4 cc as shown above. Since you’re only giving 1/4 cc, then anything above 1/4 cc syringes would be fine. Since most people don’t like to draw insulin up to the very top of the plunger, getting a 1/2 cc syringe would work fine. Now since you made sure that the insulin has the same designated Units (U40) as the syringes, all yo Continue reading >>

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