diabetestalk.net

What Role Does The Pancreas Play In The Body?

The Pancreas: Anatomy, Function, And Disorders | Everyday Health

The Pancreas: Anatomy, Function, And Disorders | Everyday Health

The pancreas is located behind the stomach in the upper-left area of the abdomen. Your pancreas is an organ that's part of both the digestive system and the endocrine system. The digestive system, which breaks down food into tiny components that are then absorbed into the body, is made up of numerous organs in addition to the pancreas, including the mouth, esophagus, stomach, and small and large intestines. The endocrine system is a collection of many different endocrine glands, such as the thyroid gland , testes, and pituitary gland, which secrete hormones directly into the bloodstream. Your pancreas is located in the upper left area of your abdomen, behind your stomach and near your duodenum, the first section of your small intestine. The organ measures about 6 inches long and weighs about one-fifth of a pound. Looking somewhat like a sweet potato, the pancreas is made up of a bulbous head and neck, a tubular body, and a narrow, pointy tail. The pancreas contains a tubelike structure called the main pancreatic duct, which runs from the tail to the head of the organ. The gallbladder's bile duct enters at the top of the pancreas's head to connect to the main pancreatic duct. The joined ducts exit from the pancreas's head and connect to the duodenum. Some people also have an additional pancreatic duct, sometimes known as the duct of Santorini, which connects to another part of the duodenum. RELATED: 9 Common Digestive Conditions From Top to Bottom Your pancreas has two main responsibilities: It helps the body digest food, and it helps regulate blood sugar. More than 95 percent of the pancreas's mass is made up of cells and tissues that produce pancreatic juices containing digestive enzymes such as amylase, lipase, elastase, and nucleases. ( 1 ) Each of these enzymes bre Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

Where is the pancreas? The pancreas is a large gland that lies alongside the stomach and the small bowel. It is about six inches (approximately 15 cm) long and is divided into the head, body and tail. What does the pancreas do? The pancreas carries out two important roles: It makes digestive juices, which consist of powerful enzymes. These are released into the small bowel after meals to break down and digest food. It makes hormones that control blood glucose levels. The pancreas produces hormones in its 'endocrine' cells. These cells are gathered in clusters known as islets of langerhans and monitor what is happening in the blood. They then can release hormones directly into the blood when necessary. In particular, they sense when sugar (glucose) levels in the blood rise, and as soon as this happens the cells produce hormones, particularly insulin. Insulin then helps the body to lower blood glucose levels and 'store' the sugar away in fat, muscle, liver and other body tissues where it can be used for energy when required. The pancreas is very close to the stomach. As soon as food is eaten, the pancreas releases digestive enzymes into the bowel to break food down. As the food is digested, and nutrient levels in the blood rise, the pancreas produces insulin to help the body store the glucose (energy) away. Between meals, the pancreas does not produce insulin and this allows the body to gradually release stores of energy back into the blood as they are needed. Glucose levels remain very stable in the blood at all times to ensure that the body has a steady supply of energy. This energy is needed for metabolism, exercise and, in particular, to fuel the parts of the brain that 'run' on glucose. This makes sure that the body doesn't starve between meals. What hormones does th Continue reading >>

Pancreas And Diabetes

Pancreas And Diabetes

The pancreas is the organ that is responsible for producing insulin The pancreas is an organ located behind the lower part of the stomach, in front of the spine and plays an important part in diabetes. The pancreas is the organ which produces insulin, one the main hormones that helps to regulate blood glucose levels . The pancreas plays a part in two different organ systems, the endocrine system and the exocrine system. The endocrine system includes all the organs which produce hormones, chemicals which are delivered via the blood to help regulate our mood, growth, metabolism and reproduction. Two of the hormones produced by the pancreas are insulin and glucagon . The exocrine system is made up of a number of glands which release substances such as sweat (to the skin), saliva (in the mouth) or, in the case of the pancreas, digestive enzymes . The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin. The cells which produce insulin are beta cells. These cells are distributed in a cluster of cells in the pancreas called the Islets of Langerhans, named after the anatomist who discovered them . Insulin is a hormone that helps to regulate blood sugar levels by assisting the transport of glucose from the blood into neighbouring cells. In type 1 diabetes , the beta cells that produce insulin are attacked by the bodys immune system. As more beta cells get killed off, the pancreas struggles to produce enough insulin to keep blood sugar levels down and the symptoms of diabetes begin to appear. Research has shown that whilst many beta cells are killed off, the body can continue to produce very small amounts of insulin even after decades have passed. News from 2012: Insulin production may last for over 30 years in type 1 diabetes In type 2 diabetes, the body builds up resistance to insul Continue reading >>

What Does The Pancreas Do?

What Does The Pancreas Do?

The pancreas is an organ that sits in the abdominal cavity behind the stomach and plays a role in both the digestive and endocrine system. In the endocrine system, it is responsible for producing several hormones, such as insulin, glucagon, somatostatin and pancreatic polypeptide. Additionally, its exocrine function involves the secretion of digestive enzymes that aid the digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine. Endocrine Function There are many cell clusters in the pancreas referred to as islets of Langerhans that are responsible for the endocrine function of the organ. The islets are composed of groups or chains of endocrine cells, woven together to form a dense network. There are four types of cells in these islets, including: α alpha cell that secrete glucagon β beta cells that secrete insulin Δ delta cells that secrete somatostatin γ gamma cells that secrete pancreatic polypeptide Each of these hormones plays an important role in the body and is essential for normal bodily functions to occur. Of particular note, glucagon and insulin work together to maintain adequate glucose levels in the blood. Glucagon is secreted when there is low blood sugar concentration to increase the glucose content, whereas insulin is secreted when there is excess sugar to decrease the glucose in the blood. For example, after a meal that causes the concentration of glucose in the blood to spike the pancreas produces insulin, which encourages the insulin to be broken down and used in the body. Conversely, when the glucose concentration falls such as during the night without eating, the pancreas produces glucagon to signal to the liver, muscle or fat cells to release sugar from the stored form. Exocrine Function The pancreas also plays a significant role in the diges Continue reading >>

What Does The Pancreas Do For The Human Body?

What Does The Pancreas Do For The Human Body?

What Does the Pancreas Do for the Human Body? This article was last updated on August 19, 2016 You may not know it, but your pancreas has a big job to do. Resting just behind the stomach, the pancreas cannot be seen or felt by touch. And, well, many people dont really know what this organ does for the body. But the pancreas plays a critical role in your overall health. Learn more about the pancreas functions, diseases, and treatment options. Located deep in the abdomen, the pancreas is responsible for the production of several important hormones, including insulin, which controls the amount of sugar in your blood. Because of its location behind your stomach, it can be difficult to diagnose pancreatic tumors or cancer, as they cant be felt like tumors under the skin or in breast tissue. This also helps explain why pancreatic diseases are usually not diagnosed until symptoms start to appear. The six-inch organ aids in digestion by making secretions of pancreatic juice that contain digestive enzymes. These enzymes help food be absorbed more easily into the small intestine. Pancreatic diseases can affect your whole body. Since the pancreas helps regulate your blood sugar, it is linked to Type 1 diabetes : This is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to allow sugar to enter cells to produce critical energy. Type 2 diabetes: If you have type 2 diabetes, your body does not use insulin properly a condition referred to as insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas produces extra insulin to make up for it, but overtime, the organ simply cannot keep up to produce enough insulin to stabilize your blood sugar levels. There are many other diseases and problems which may affect your pancreas in addition to diabetes, including: Pa Continue reading >>

Pancreas: Function, Location & Diseases

Pancreas: Function, Location & Diseases

MORE The pancreas is an abdominal organ that is located behind the stomach and is surrounded by other organs, including the spleen, liver and small intestine. The pancreas is about 6 inches (15.24 centimeters) long, oblong and flat. The pancreas plays an important role in digestion and in regulating blood sugar. Three diseases associated with the pancreas are pancreatitis, pancreatic cancer and diabetes. Function of the pancreas The pancreas serves two primary functions, according to Jordan Knowlton, an advanced registered nurse practitioner at the University of Florida Health Shands Hospital. It makes “enzymes to digest proteins, fats, and carbs in the intestines” and produces the hormones insulin and glucagon, he said. Dr. Richard Bowen of Colorado State University’s Department of Biomedical Sciences wrote in Hypertexts for Pathophysiology: Endocrine System, “A well-known effect of insulin is to decrease the concentration of glucose in blood.” This lowers blood sugar levels and allows the body’s cells to use glucose for energy. Insulin also allows glucose to enter muscle and other tissue, works with the liver to store glucose and synthesize fatty acids, and “stimulates the uptake of amino acids,” according to Bowen. Insulin is released after eating protein and especially after eating carbohydrates, which increase glucose levels in the blood. If the pancreas does not produce sufficient insulin, type 1 diabetes will develop. Unlike insulin, glucagon raises blood sugar levels. According to the Johns Hopkins University Sol Goldman Pancreatic Cancer Research Center, the combination of insulin and glucagon maintains the proper level of sugar in the blood. The pancreas’ second, exocrine function is to produce and release digestive fluids. After food enters Continue reading >>

Liver And Pancreas - Functions Of The Human Body Systems

Liver And Pancreas - Functions Of The Human Body Systems

The liver is the largest gland or chemical factoryin the body. It is like a spongeshaped like a wedge. It has many metabolic and secretory functions. It produces a digestive fluid called bile, which is important in faciliating fat digestion and absorption. It stores vitamins and glycogen (a polysaccharide, that is the main form of carbohydrate storage in animals and occurs primarily in the liver and muscle tissue. It is readily converted to glucose as needed by the body to satisfy its energy needs. Also called animal starch). toremove waste and toxic material from the blood, to eliminate red blood cells that are no longer needed. The liver produces and releases about 800 and 1,000 ml of bile each day. Bile is also a gateway for the excretion of toxic substances such as drugs. A duct carries the bile to the common bile duct, which pours the bile into the duodenum (first section of the small intestines). The ducts are also connected to the gallbladder where the bile is concentrated and stored. Used red blood cells, which are called senescent red blood cells, are destroyed in the liver, spleen, and bone marrow. Bile is a greenish orange color because of the pigment bilirubin, which is made by the breakdown of hemoglobin (the iron-containing respiratory pigment in red blood cells). Liver cells produce a number of enzymes. When blood flows through the liver, the cells and enzymes are filtered. Nutrients that come into the liver through the intestines are converted so they can be used by cells and stored more easily. 1. Fats --> Fatty acids-->Carbohydrates or ketone bodies 2. Sugars --> Glycogen (stored in the liver until energy production --> glucose) The liver produces blood serum proteins and many clotting factors. The livermetabolizes nitrogenous waste products and detox

What Is The Role Of The Pancreas In Digestion?

What Is The Role Of The Pancreas In Digestion?

Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Continue reading >>

An Overview Of The Pancreas

An Overview Of The Pancreas

Pancreas Essentials The pancreas maintains the body’s blood glucose (sugar) balance. Primary hormones of the pancreas include insulin and glucagon, and both regulate blood glucose. Diabetes is the most common disorder associated with the pancreas. The pancreas is unique in that it’s both an endocrine and exocrine gland. In other words, the pancreas has the dual function of secreting hormones into blood (endocrine) and secreting enzymes through ducts (exocrine). The pancreas belongs to the endocrine and digestive systems—with most of its cells (more than 90%) working on the digestive side. However, the pancreas performs the vital duty of producing hormones—most notably insulin—to maintain the balance of blood glucose (sugar) and salt in the body. Without this balance, your body is susceptible to serious complications, such as diabetes. Anatomy of the Pancreas The pancreas is a 6 inch-long flattened gland that lies deep within the abdomen, between the stomach and the spine. It is connected to the duodenum, which is part of the small intestine. Only about 5% of the pancreas is comprised of endocrine cells. These cells are clustered in groups within the pancreas and look like little islands of cells when examined under a microscope. These groups of pancreatic endocrine cells are known as pancreatic islets or more specifically, islets of Langerhans (named after the scientist who discovered them). Hormones of the Pancreas The production of pancreatic hormones, including insulin, somatostatin, gastrin, and glucagon, play an important role in maintaining sugar and salt balance in our bodies. Gastrin: This hormone aids digestion by stimulating certain cells in the stomach to produce acid. Glucagon: Glucagon helps insulin maintain normal blood glucose by working in the Continue reading >>

Pancreas: Functions And Possible Problems

Pancreas: Functions And Possible Problems

The pancreas is a gland organ. It is located in the abdomen. It is part of the digestive system and produces insulin and other important enzymes and hormones that help break down foods. The pancreas has an endocrine function because it releases juices directly into the bloodstream, and it has an exocrine function because it releases juices into ducts. Enzymes, or digestive juices, are secreted by the pancreas into the small intestine. There, it continues breaking down food that has left the stomach. The pancreas also produces the hormone insulin and secretes it into the bloodstream, where it regulates the body's glucose or sugar level. Problems with insulin control can lead to diabetes. Here are some key points about the pancreas. More detail is in the main article. The pancreas is a gland organ with a key role in digestion and glucose control. A healthful diet can contribute to maintaining a healthy pancreas. Features of the pancreas The pancreas is an organ 6 to 8 inches long. It extends horizontally across the abdomen. The largest part lays on the right side of the abdomen where the stomach attaches to the first part of the small intestine, the duodenum. At this point, the partially digested food passes from the stomach into the small intestine, and it mixes with the secretions from the pancreas. The narrow part of the pancreas extends to the left side of the abdomen next to the spleen. A duct runs the length of the pancreas, and it is joined by several small branches from the glandular tissue. The end of this duct is connected to a similar duct that comes from the liver, which delivers bile to the duodenum. Around 95 percent of the pancreas is exocrine tissue. It produces pancreatic enzymes to aid digestion. A healthy pancreas makes about 2.2 pints (1 liter) of thes Continue reading >>

What Does The Pancreas Do?

What Does The Pancreas Do?

The pancreas is a six-inch-long gland located in your abdomen near your liver and part of the small intestine. Its nestled right behind and slightly below your stomach and in front of your spine. The head of the pancreas is along the curve of your duodenum, the first part of the small intestine just beyond the stomach. The pancreas plays a dual role in your bodily functions: Endocrine system. The pancreas secretes hormones, including the blood sugar-regulating hormones: insulin and glucagon. Exocrine system. The pancreas also secretes enzymes into your digestive tract through a duct into your duodenum. As part of the endocrine system, the pancreas secretes two main hormones that are vital to regulating your glucose (also known as blood sugar) level: Insulin. The pancreas secretes this hormone to lower blood glucose when levels get too high. Glucagon: The pancreas secretes this hormone to increase blood glucose when levels get too low. Balanced blood glucose levels play a significant role in your liver, kidneys, and even your brain. Proper secretion of these hormones is important to many bodily systems, such as your nervous system and cardiovascular system. As part of your exocrine system, the pancreas secretes enzymes that work in tandem with bile from the liver and gallbladder to help break down substances for proper digestion and absorption. Enzymes produced by the pancreas for digestion include: chymotrypsin and trypsin for digesting proteins The pancreas is part of a larger digestive process that begins in the stomach: The pancreas produces enzymes as soon as food reaches the stomach. These enzymes travel through a series of ducts until they reach the main pancreatic duct. The main pancreatic duct meets the common bile duct, which carries bile from the gallbladder Continue reading >>

How Does The Pancreas Work?

How Does The Pancreas Work?

The pancreas is 12 to 18 centimeters (about 4.7 to 7.1 inches) long and weighs about 70 to 100 grams. The pancreas is made up of a head, a body and a pointy tail. It is located in the upper abdomen behind the stomach. The organ has two major functions. It produces Hormones and enzymes are produced in two different groups of cells: Exocrine pancreas cells Over 99% of the exocrine pancreas cells produce digestive juices – about 1.5 to 2 liters per day. They are called exocrine ("secreting externally") because they secrete digestive juice "externally" into the small intestine. This clear, colorless juice is mainly made up of water and also contains salt, sodium bicarbonate and digestive enzymes. There are enzymes for breaking down fats (lipases), proteins (proteases), and carbohydrates (amylases). Proteases are inactive while inside the pancreas. They are activated once they have been secreted into the small intestine. The sodium bicarbonate neutralizes the acidic gastric (stomach) juice in the mass of semi-digested food to help the digestive enzymes work better. The digestive juices flows from the pancreas through an excretory duct into the small intestine. In most people, this duct joins up with the the excretory duct of the gallbladder before reaching the small intestine. A sphincter muscle at the end of the duct controls the flow of digestive juice into the small intestine. In case of pancreatitis, enzymes may be activated inside the pancreas before reaching the small intestine, causing the gland to start "digesting itself." Endocrine pancreas cells Groups of endocrine cells are spread over the surface of the pancreas. They are called islets of Langerhans, because they are scattered like small islands and were discovered by pathologist Paul Langerhans. These islet ce Continue reading >>

Pancreas: Anatomy And Functions

Pancreas: Anatomy And Functions

The pancreas is an elongated, tapered organ located across the back of the abdomen, behind the stomach. The right side of the organ, called the head, is the widest part of the organ. It lies in the curve of the duodenum, the first section of the small intestine. The tapered left side extends slightly upward, called the body of the pancreas, and ends near the spleen, called the tail. The pancreas is made up of2 types of glands: Exocrine. The exocrine gland secretes digestive enzymes. These enzymes are secreted into a network of ducts that join the main pancreatic duct. It runs the length of the pancreas. Endocrine. The endocrine gland consists of the islets of Langerhans and secretes hormones into the bloodstream. The pancreas has digestive and hormonal functions: The enzymes secreted by the exocrine gland in the pancreas help break down carbohydrates, fats, proteins, and acids in the duodenum. These enzymes travel down the pancreatic duct into the bile duct in an inactive form. When they enter the duodenum, they are activated. The exocrine tissue also secretes a bicarbonate to neutralize stomach acid in the duodenum. The main hormones secreted by the endocrine gland in the pancreas are insulin and glucagon. They regulate the level of glucose in the blood, and somatostatin, which prevents the release of the other2 hormones. More Information About the Pancreas in the Health Library Continue reading >>

Pancreas - National Library Of Medicine - Pubmed Health

Pancreas - National Library Of Medicine - Pubmed Health

The pancreas and nearby organs National Institutes of Health The pancreas is 12 to 18 centimeters (about 4.7 to 7.1 inches) long and weighs about 70 to 80 grams. This gland is located across the upper abdomen behind the stomach . It plays an important role in digestion and in regulating blood sugar levels. To do this it produces enzymes , which break down foods in the intestine , as well as hormones such as insulin , which maintain a constant blood sugar level. The pancreas is made up of a head, a body and a pointy tail. Inside of the pancreas there are many small glandular cells . Over 99% of these glandular cells produce digestive juices about 1.5 to 2 liters per day. This clear, colorless "pancreatic juice" is then released into the intestine . It is mainly made up of water and also has salt, sodium bicarbonate and digestive enzymes in it. Sodium bicarbonate neutralizes the acidic gastric ( stomach ) juice in the mass of semi-digested food, ensuring that... Read more about the Pancreas Continue reading >>

Pancreas

Pancreas

For other uses, see Pancreas (disambiguation). This article uses anatomical terminology; for an overview, see Anatomical terminology. The pancreas /ˈpæŋkriəs/ is a glandular organ in the digestive system and endocrine system of vertebrates. In humans, it is located in the abdominal cavity behind the stomach. It is an endocrine gland producing several important hormones, including insulin, glucagon, somatostatin, and pancreatic polypeptide, all of which circulate in the blood.[2] The pancreas is also a digestive organ, secreting pancreatic juice containing bicarbonate to neutralize acidity of chyme moving in from the stomach, as well as digestive enzymes that assist digestion and absorption of nutrients in the small intestine. These enzymes help to further break down the carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids in the chyme. The pancreas is known as a mixed gland. Structure[edit] 1. Bile ducts: 2. Intrahepatic bile ducts, 3. Left and right hepatic ducts, 4. Common hepatic duct, 5. Cystic duct, 6. Common bile duct, 7. Ampulla of Vater, 8. Major duodenal papilla 9. Gallbladder, 10–11. Right and left lobes of liver. 12. Spleen. 13. Esophagus. 14. Stomach. 15. Pancreas: 16. Accessory pancreatic duct, 17. Pancreatic duct. 18. Small intestine: 19. Duodenum, 20. Jejunum 21–22. Right and left kidneys. The front border of the liver has been lifted up (brown arrow).[3] The pancreas is an endocrine and digestive organ that, in humans, lies in the upper left part of the abdomen. It is found behind the stomach.[4] The pancreas is about 15 cm (6 in) long.[5] Anatomically, the pancreas is divided into the head of pancreas, the neck of pancreas, the body of pancreas, and the tail of pancreas.[2] The head is surrounded by the duodenum in its concavity. The head surrounds two blood ves Continue reading >>

More in insulin