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What Needle Is Used For Insulin?

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

If you or someone you know has diabetes, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are living with it. And of those, about 15% use medicine that’s injected. Vials and syringes used to be the most common way to inject. But today, many injectable diabetes medicines come in prescription pens, also called prefilled pens. Here, we will focus on the needles that are used with those pens. Choosing a pen needle Today's pen needles are designed to fit most prefilled pens. But, there are other things to consider when choosing a pen needle. Talk with your health care provider; together you can decide which needle works best for you. To learn more about Novo Nordisk’s line of needles and to find the pen needle that’s right for you, click here. Today’s needles are shorter and thinner People who have never self-injected may have concerns about doing so and that’s understandable. But pen needles have come a long way from the ones first launched in 1985. Since then, injection comfort has driven needle technology, making the needles used today shorter and thinner than the ones used in the past. Understanding needle size Pen needles come in all different sizes. The size of a needle is indicated by 2 factors—length and gauge (G): Needle length is measured in millimeters. Lengths range anywhere from 12.7 mm to 4 mm, the shortest insulin pen needle currently available Understanding gauge can be a little tricky. The gauge of a needle refers to its thickness. You would think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, a 32G needle is thinner than a 27G needle Always use a new needle for each injection You run the risk of infection from reusing needles. The more you reuse a needle, t Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

I have been injecting insulin for two years. My question is about needle length. I’ve used a U-100 31-gauge, 8-mm “short” needle because—well, it should hurt less, right? Because I am slightly obese, should I use the 29-gauge, 12.7-mm needle instead? Continue reading >>

Best Way To Get Rid Of Used Needles And Other Sharps

Best Way To Get Rid Of Used Needles And Other Sharps

The FDA recommends a two-step process for properly disposing of used needles and other sharps. Step 1: Place all needles and other sharps in a sharps disposal container immediately after they have been used. This will reduce the risk of needle sticks, cuts, and punctures from loose sharps. Sharps disposal containers should be kept out of reach of children and pets. Note: Overfilling a sharps disposal container increases the risk of accidental needle-stick injury. When your sharps disposal container is about three-quarters (3/4) full, follow your community guidelines for getting rid of the container (Step 2, below). DO NOT reuse sharps disposal containers. Be prepared when leaving home. Always carry a small, travel-size sharps disposal container in case other options are not available. If traveling by plane, check the Transportation Security Administration (TSA) website for up-to-date rules on what to do with your sharps. To make your trip through airport security easier, make sure your medicines are labeled with the type of medicine and the manufacturer's name or a drug store label, and bring a letter from your doctor. Step 2: Dispose of used sharps disposal containers according to your community guidelines. Sharps disposal guidelines and programs vary depending on where you live. Check with your local trash removal services or health department (listed in the city or county government (blue) pages in your phone book) to see which of the following disposal methods are available in your area: Drop Box or Supervised Collection Sites You may be able to drop off your sharps disposal containers at appropriate chosen collection sites, such as doctors' offices, hospitals, pharmacies, health departments, medical waste facilities, and police or fire stations. Services may be fre Continue reading >>

Meet The Insujet™.

Meet The Insujet™.

The insulin-jet administration system. The InsuJet™ system is developed for people with diabetes and is used to administer insulin. A special, needle-free nozzle is the key feature of the system. By pressing insulin through the nozzle orifice, a fine stream of insulin is created that easily penetrates the skin. Subsequently, the insulin follows the path of least resistance, spreading evenly in the subcutaneous layer. No needle, no worries The absence of a needle has obvious advantages. There are no needle disposal issues, nor any risk of needle prick accidents. So, don't worry about the kids if you accidentally left the device within their reach! Clinical advantages More importantly, research has shown that jet administration is a highly effective manner to administer insulin. It improves the absorption, as well as the action. faster absorption & action of insulin Portable, all-in-one design Re-usable Virtually pain free No needle disposal issues No risk of needle stick injuries How does it work? The InsuJet™ operation principle is based on pressure. By means of a spring system, the insulin is pressed at high speed through a small orifice in the nozzle, creating a fine stream of insulin that easily penetrates the skin. Directly under the skin the insulin diffuses in the subcutaneous tissue. To secure a safe and convenient administration, the InsuJet™ is equipped with a unique safety mechanism that ensures that the contact area between the nozzle and administration site is not breached during injection. InsuJet™ compared to needle injection in 30 seconds Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat Care

Diabetic Cat Care

Many human insulin types now come in pen form and this trend is becoming more popular when it comes to insulin for diabetic cats. The problem with using the pens is they only allow for half or full units of insulin to be dosed, where with TR we typically give insulin in much smaller, fractional increments. If your vet is planning to prescribe pen form insulin to you, we recommend you ask for a prescription for refill cartridges and syringes with half unit markings to match the insulin instead. If you've already got insulin in pen form, it is possible to use syringes to access the insulin inside. If after reviewing this sticky, you have any questions about which insulin syringes to use, please post on Talking TR for assistance. The top photo is a U40 syringe which come with red caps and needles covers, and are also available with red unit marks. U40 syringes are made to hold 20.0u of U40 insulin or less, and are difficult to find with half unit marks. Your vet will tell you U40 insulin must be used with U40 syringes however, it is possible to use U40 insulin with U100 syringes. The important thing is to get syringes with half unit markings. We recommend using the syringe in the bottom of the photo which is a 3/10cc (ml) 100 syringe, for use with 30.0 units or less of U100 insulin. They have orange caps and needle covers. U100 syringes come with both full and half unit marks. Syringes with half unit marks make measuring the small increments given on TR much easier and more accurate. If from Europe, the description is 3/10ml, for 30 units or less, demi (descriptor for half unit markings). The cc and ml unit of measurement is the same. U100 syringes can be utilized with U40 insulin by using the conversion chart. Half unit marks make for much easier measuring of half and qua Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

Pen needles are used in conjunction with injection pens to deliver injectable medications into the body. A pen needle consists of a hollow needle which is embedded in a plastic hub and attaches to injection pens. Pen needles come in a variety of needle lengths and diameters and are used by health professionals and patients for injection of a variety of medications. They are commonly used by people with diabetes who often require multiple daily insulin injections. Needle technology has changed over the past decades. Many years ago home use syringe needles were large, and had to be sterilized and sharpened by hand by patients themselves. Today’s pen needles are engineered and manufactured for greater comfort and ease of use with electro-polishing for needle smoothness; thin, fine point tips for ease in penetration; lubrication for less friction and more glide; plastic caps for safety; and individual wrapping for sterility. Injection pen and pen needles are an alternative drug delivery method to the traditional vial/syringe method. Background[edit] Insulin and other injectable medications are commonly administered with drug delivery pens. Pens are one of the easiest and fastest-growing methods for administering insulin and other injectable medication. The medication either comes in a disposable pen or in a cartridge for use with a re-usable pen. The user generally attaches the pen needle, dials a dose of medicine, then injects the medicine under the skin. Highly popular for more than 20 years in Europe, use of injection pens and pen needles is rapidly spreading in the U.S. for diabetes care and other non-diabetes drugs. As technology and competition advance, driving the desire for more comfortable and more effective injections, the design of the pen needle and its parts Continue reading >>

Insulin Syringes

Insulin Syringes

An insulin syringe has three parts: a needle, a barrel, and a plunger. The needle is short and thin and covered with a fine layer of silicone to allow it to pass through the skin easily and lessen pain. A cap covers and protects the needle before it is used. The barrel is the long, thin chamber that holds the insulin. The barrel is marked with lines to measure the number of insulin units. The plunger is a long, thin rod that fits snugly inside the barrel of the syringe. It easily slides up and down to either draw the insulin into the barrel or push the insulin out of the barrel through the needle. The plunger has a rubber seal at the lower end to prevent leakage. The rubber seal is matched with the line on the barrel to measure the correct amount of insulin. Insulin syringes are made in several sizes. Syringe size and units Syringe size Number of units the syringe holds 1/4 mL or 0.25 mL 25 1/3 mL or 0.33 mL 30 1/2 mL or 0.50 mL 50 1 mL 100 Use the smallest syringe size you can for the dose of insulin you need. The measuring lines on the barrel of small syringes are farther apart and easier to see. When you choose the size of syringe, consider the number of units you need to give and how well you can see the markings on the barrel. A 0.25 mL or 0.33 mL syringe usually is best for children (who often need very small doses of insulin) and for people with poor eyesight. A 1 mL syringe may be best for an adult who needs to take a large amount of insulin. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

Giving An Insulin Injection

Giving An Insulin Injection

Your health care provider or a certified diabetes educator (CDE) will teach you all of these steps, watch you practice, and answer your questions. You may take notes to remember the details. Know the name and dose of each medicine to give. The type of insulin should match the type of syringe: Standard insulin contains 100 units in 1 mL. This is also called U-100 insulin. Most insulin syringes are marked for giving you U-100 insulin. Every notch on a standard 1 mL insulin syringe is 1 unit of insulin. More concentrated insulins are now available. These include U-500 and U-300. Because U-500 syringes may be difficult to find, your provider may give you instructions for using U-500 insulin with U-100 syringes. Insulin syringes or concentrated insulin are now widely available. DO NOT mix or dilute their concentrated insulin with any other insulin. Some types of insulin can be mixed with each other in one syringe, but many cannot be mixed. Check with your provider or pharmacist about this. Other general tips: Always use the same brands and types of supplies. DO NOT use expired insulin. Insulin should be given at room temperature. If you had it in the refrigerator or cooler bag, take it out 30 minutes before the injection. Once you have started using a vial of insulin, it can be kept at room temperature for a month. Gather your supplies: insulin, needles, syringes, alcohol wipes, and a container for used needles and syringes. To fill a syringe with one type of insulin: Wash your hands with soap and water. Dry them well. Check the insulin bottle label. Make sure it is the right insulin. Make sure it is not expired. The insulin should not have any clumps on the sides of the bottle. If it does, throw it out and get another bottle. Intermediate-acting insulin (N or NPH) is cloudy Continue reading >>

Syringe

Syringe

Syringes[1] are commonly used to inject cats and dogs with insulin. The strength of an insulin is measured in International Units (IUs)[2]. The two common strengths are U40 and U100, meaning 40 units and 100 units per millilitre, respectively. Cubic centimeters (cc's) and milliliters (mL's) are interchangable, so syringes marked 1ml equals 1cc; 0.5 ml equals 1/2cc. 3/10cc equals 0.3ml[3]. There are syringes designed for use with U100 insulin and syringes designed for use with U40 insulin. They were at one time color-coded: U100 syringes having orange caps while U40's have red ones[4][5]. Unfortunately some U40's now have orange caps, too -- check the barrel carefully for U40 or U100 to be sure! To inject, pull skin up first, and insert the needle firmly parallel to the body, bevel side up[6]. Insulin syringes are intended for a single use only. Using them twice[7] may contaminate and/or interfere with some insulin's activity, in addition to wearing the protective coating off the needle and causing more pain at injection[8]. When the protective silicon coating is worn away by re-use, it can also contaminate the insulin; white precipitates[9]can form in the vial from the silicon, possibly interfering with the action of the insulin[10]. Comparing the first use and the sixth use in the photo examples, you can see how the coating has almost been totally worn off by the sixth use. You can also see the point beginning to blunt after second use. When a needle becomes blunted from re-use as you see in the photos, it can create lipohypertrophy due to skin damage[11]. Injecting insulin into areas like this means poor or slow insulin absorption. Some people use yesterday's syringe or disposable needle as a lancet, though. You can also see that when the needle is held with the bevel Continue reading >>

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

10 Tips For A Fear Of Needles With Diabetes (+1 Bonus!)

back to Overview Tips & Tricks Type 1 It is what it is, right? When living with type 1 diabetes there's no getting around the jab of a needle. Whether it's from an insulin pen, a syringe or a pump infusion set, you have to do it. Ilka asked our team for tips on dealing with a fear of shots and needles, and here's what she found... For some, needles are no big deal. For others, each injection is a challenge to overcome – even after many years. The reasons are usually different, and no matter how necessary it is (we all know it, logically) who can criticize? Is there anything normal about stabbing yourself with a sharp metal object? I think not! We have a lot of diabetes experience here at mySugr, collectively more than 150 years under our belts. And who better to ask for tips and tricks for overcoming a fear of needles/needle phobia than a bunch of people living well with diabetes? 1. Injectors Clara: I didn’t do my own injections right away. The day where everything changed was when I watched another girl my age in the hospital do her own injection. I thought, “if she can do it, so can I!” But some time later I developed an “injection-crisis” again and used an injection device, which hides the needle completely, to help me get through it. 2. Build Confidence Marlis: I’ve been helping children with diabetes for a long time, and fear of needles is very common. It can really help if mom or dad offers to let the child inject them, or even put in a pump infusion set. When those little ones see that you trust them to poke you and that it doesn’t hurt when they put the needle in it builds a lot of confidence and trust. Another step is to watch mom or dad do an injection and see that it’s fine. I have often let the kids inject me and they were so incredibly pr Continue reading >>

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

The Appropriateness Of The Length Of Insulin Needles Based On Determination Of Skin And Subcutaneous Fat Thickness In The Abdomen And Upper Arm In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

The Appropriateness Of The Length Of Insulin Needles Based On Determination Of Skin And Subcutaneous Fat Thickness In The Abdomen And Upper Arm In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes

Go to: Abstract Longer needle and complicated insulin injection technique such as injecting at a 45-degree angle and making skinfolds may decrease patient compliance to insulin injection therapy. In this light, shorter insulin needles have been recently developed. However, it is necessary to ascertain that such shorter needles are appropriate for Korean patients with diabetes as well. First, the diverse demographic and diabetic features of 156 Korean adults with diabetes were collected by a questionnaire and a device unit of body fat measurement. The skin and subcutaneous fat thicknesses of each subject were measured by Ultrasound device with a 7- to 12-MHz probe. Data were analyzed using analysis of variance and multiple linear regression. Results The mean skin thickness was 2.29±0.37 mm in the abdomen and 2.00±0.34 mm in the upper arms, and the mean subcutaneous fat thickness was to 10.15±6.54 mm in the abdomen and 5.50±2.68 mm in the upper arms. Our analysis showed that the factors affecting the skin thickness of the abdomen and upper arms were gender and body mass index (BMI), whereas the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the abdomen were gender and BMI, and the factors influencing the subcutaneous fat thickness in the upper arms were gender, BMI, and age. Insulin fluids may not appear to be intradermally injected into the abdomen and upper arms at any needle lengths. The risk of intramuscular injection is likely to increase with longer insulin needles and lower BMI. It is recommended to fully inform the patients about the lengths of needles for insulin injections. As for the recommended needle length, the findings of this study indicate that needles as short as 4 mm are sufficient to deliver insulin for Korean patients with diabetes. Keyword Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

Protection From Needle Stick Injuries In Insulin Injections

Protection From Needle Stick Injuries In Insulin Injections

Author: Dr Kenneth Strauss, Endocrinologist and Director of Safety in Medicine, European Medical Association, and Global Medical Director, Becton Dickinson (BD) Needle Stick Injuries (NSI) with diabetes needles or lancing devices are one of the highest frequency sharps injuries in the healthcare setting[1]. Some healthcare workers believe that because people with diabetes inject with short thin needles they represent little risk of transmitting infection. This is a dangerous fallacy. Diabetes needles themselves have been shown to retain traces of blood. It takes minute quantities of blood to transmit hepatitis B virus (HBV) or C (HCV). The average volume of blood inoculated in a NSI with a thin gauge needle ranges from 1.0 – 2.0 µL[2]. This volume is more than enough to transmit an infectious dose of a blood-borne virus. In fact the viral load in a µL of infected blood can be up to a million (106) virus particles for HBV[3]. Thus the viral contamination from one NSI is sufficient to infect many people with HBV. The viral load for HCV is lower, but is still enough to infect multiple victims. If we move from risk to actual conversions, the story is still worrying. Studies show that HCV conversions are between one and two for every hundred NSI percutaneous exposures with contaminated sharps[4]. According to one study[5], HBV DNA was discovered in 11% of type 2 patients with diabetes, compared to 3% of the control sample. The Centers for Disease Control in Atlanta, Georgia, USA has recommended mandatory HBV vaccination for patients with diabetes and has warned that many of them may be asymptomatically infected with HBV. Presumably they were infected in settings where they underwent assisted blood glucose monitoring, with more than one person using the monitor[6]. The pr Continue reading >>

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