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What Is The Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

All You Need To Know About Insulin Sensitivity Factor

All You Need To Know About Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Insulin is a hormone that plays an important role in the body's metabolism by controlling blood sugar levels and other processes. It is produced by beta cells in the pancreas and released it into the bloodstream after we eat to enable some body cells, such as muscle, fat, and heart cells, to absorb the sugar from the food we eat. Insulin also helps store glucose in the liver as glycogen when it is not needed, so it can be released when blood sugar levels are low or when more energy is needed. Therefore, insulin is essential for regulating blood sugar, ensuring that levels remain within certain limits and do not climb too high or fall too low. What is insulin sensitivity factor? Insulin sensitivity factor, or correction factor, refers to the number of milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) fall in blood sugar levels caused by taking 1 unit of insulin. Knowing this number can help people with type 1 diabetes lower their blood sugar levels when they are out of their target range. This is usually added to the premeal insulin dose and is based on how much higher the person's blood sugar level is compared to their target. Target blood sugar levels need to be determined in discussions with a doctor. According to the American Diabetes Association, they should be as close as possible to healthy non-diabetic levels of: Between 70 and 130 mg/dl before a meal No higher than 180 mg/dl up to 2 hours after a meal Insulin treatment plans vary, but most people with type 1 diabetes are now on a basal-bolus insulin routine. A basal-bolus insulin routine involves injecting a longer-acting form of insulin to keep blood sugar levels stable between meals and when sleeping and injections of faster-acting insulin to cover meals. For people on a pump, an amount of fast-acting insulin is delivered thro Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community The ISF on my pump was initially setup at 1:3 when I first started on the pump. But last week the nurse wasn't happy with the speed at which the correction boluses were taking effect so did a recalculation of the ISF for me. I'm now finding that the correction boluses are sending me low so am just going to split the difference between the 1:3 I was on before, the 1:2 that she changed me to and set it up as 1:2.5 and see how that goes. They seemed to use an incredibly crude method of figuring it out though, just dividing the average total daily dose of insulin into 100. That doesn't sound a particularly good way of figuring out how sensitive you are to insulin when it is not taking into account other factors, such as how much your eating or exercising. All I can find online about how to figure out the sensitivity is just similar calculations, although using the US units mostly. Can anyone explain the thinking behind such a basic method of figuring it out? Am I missing something obvious in how they come up with the numbers? I might be wrong here Spideog but I don't think your dsn has worked out your ISF correctly. She thinks that by altering your ISF to 1:2mmol will only make your bg levels drop by 2mmol for every 1u you use to correct but what happens is that the pump will use that calculation to bring your bg level back to being in target range so in actual fact the pump will use more insulin in its calculation instead of less. If you found yourself going hypo with the ISF of 1:3mmol then by altering it to 1:2mmol will only make you go even more hypo. I would try the ISF of 1:3.5mmol and then tinker about with the calculation by seeing what your bg le Continue reading >>

What’s Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

What’s Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, if you’re taking insulin via pump, pen, or syringe, you need to know your “insulin sensitivity factor” or “correction factor.” Without knowing this number, you don’t know how much insulin you need to correct a high blood sugar and risk either going far too low after an injection or simply not going low enough to meet the goal of a healthy blood sugar level. What is an “Insulin Sensitivity Factor”? A ISF (insulin sensitivity factor) is the number of points in your blood sugar by which 1 unit of insulin will reduce your blood sugar. For instance, my ISF is 1:100, which means that if my blood sugar is 200 mg/dL and I want to take a correction dose to bring it down to 125 mg/dL, I would need to take .75 units of insulin. Depending on your level of activity, insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance, your age, your diet, the amount of carbohydrates you consume on a daily basis, and your bodyweight, your ISF could range anywhere from 2 to 200! Children are obviously far more sensitive to insulin than grown adults. Teenagers tend to have higher insulin needs than adults because of growth hormones, and those with type 2 diabetes are more likely to have greater insulin resistance (hence the type 2 diabetes diagnosis). I have worked both with adult type 2 diabetes who had ISF ratios of 1:3 (1 unit drops them 3 points in their blood sugar) and young children who had ISF ratios of 1:150 (1 unit drops them 150 points). How to Determine Your ISF: Gary Scheiner, MS. CDE. explains on page 163 of his book, “Think Like a Pancreas,” that you can actually get a close estimate of your ISF based on your total daily insulin usage in this chart on the right. But don’t stop there simply with the number you get from the chart on t Continue reading >>

Programming Your Pump

Programming Your Pump

Learn to program different patterns to meet different needs. Some examples that might prompt additional programming are: weekend or shift work, exercise, hormonal fluctuations, or travel. You can pre-program your insulin pump to deliver a tiny amount of insulin every few minutes in a cycle of 24 hours. This is known as a basal rate pattern. Basal insulin rates The basal rate replaces the insulin that your body is not producing naturally. The rate is programmed as unit(s) per half hour or per hour. You can program different patterns to meet different needs. Some examples that might prompt additional programming are: weekend or shift work, exercise, hormonal fluctuations, or travel. The basal infusion occurs automatically; it just keeps delivering insulin in the pre-programmed pattern until you decide to change the rate. Bolus insulin You can also pre-program your insulin pump with the bolus settings, including the insulin to carbohydrate ratios, bolus infusion profiles, and insulin sensitivity factor. Insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio is programmed as 1 unit of insulin per number of carbohydrate grams. This means that 1 unit of insulin will dispose of so many grams of carbohydrate. Multiple insulin-to-carbohydrate ratios may be set for different meals – breakfast, lunch, dinner, snacks, etc. For example, if 1 unit of insulin disposes of 10 grams of carbohydrates, it is expressed as the ratio 1:10 g of carbohydrate. The settings also can be pre-set to deliver different bolus infusion profiles, such as an extended (square wave) or dual (combination) bolus. An extended/square wave delivers the bolus insulin over a specified number of minutes, and a dual/combination bolus delivers a certain portion of the insulin immediately and the rest as an extended/square wave. The proport Continue reading >>

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Your insulin sensitivity factor (ISF) determines how much your blood sugar will drop in response to 1 unit of insulin. The total drop must be measured 2-3 hours later. It can vary, particularly in the morning, where you generally require more insulin to correct for a high blood sugar compared to the rest of the day. Calculating your insulin sensitivity is quite easy. Just enter the amount of insulin, and the corresponding correction it gives you e.g. 3 units of insulin at breakfast time drops you 9 mmol/162mg. Step 1. Enter Current Values Meal time How much insulin? Gives you a BGL drop of...? One unit of insulin covers: Breakfast units mg/dL mmol/L Morning tea units (the same units are used below) Lunch units Afternoon tea units Dinner units Supper units Step 2. Review Now you need to check if your ratios are right. If you get low after a breakfast correction (test 2-3 hours after), then you are getting to much insulin and you need to increase the BGL drop given by 1 unit. Try adding 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. However, if you are getting too high after breakfast (test 2-3 hours after), then you need more insulin. Try reducing by 1mmol / 18mg, and then test with the new ratio. Predict blood sugars three hours ahead! Get live coaching to improve your ratios! Try ManageBGL now. Available scenarios: How does Low GI food affect my blood sugar? Calculating Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) Calculating Carbohydrate Ratio Should I inject before my meal? Afreeza versus Humalog/Novolog/NovoRapid Lucy thought she was Low Undiagnosed versus diagnosed Type 2 diabetic Suggestions for more scenarios? Please send them to us Continue reading >>

Autosensitivity (automatically Adjusting Insulin Sensitivity Factor For Insulin Dosing With #openaps)

Autosensitivity (automatically Adjusting Insulin Sensitivity Factor For Insulin Dosing With #openaps)

There’s a secret behind why #OpenAPS was able to deal so well with my BGs during norovirus. Namely, “autosensitivity”. Autosensitivity (or “autosens”, for short hand) is an advanced feature that can optionally be enabled in OpenAPS. We know how hard it is for a PWD (person with diabetes) to pay attention to all the numbers and all the things and realize when something is “off”. This could be a bad pump site, a pump site going bad, hormones from growth, hormones from menstrual cycles, sensitivity from exercise the day before, etc. So at the beginning of the year, Scott and I started brainstorming with the community about automatically detecting when the PWD is more or less sensitive to insulin than normal, and adjusting accordingly. Building on the success we’d had in DIYPS with fixed “sensitivity” and “resistance” modes, we built the feature to assess how sensitive or resistant the body is (compared to normal), rather than just a binary mode that sets a predefined response. How OpenAPS calculates autosensitivity/how it works It looks at each BG data point for the last 24 hours and calculates the delta (actual observed change) over the last 5 minutes. It then compares it to “BGI” (blood glucose impact, which is how much BG *should* be dropping from insulin alone), and assesses the “deviations” (differences between the delta and BGI). When sensitivity is normal and basals are well tuned, we expect somewhere between 45-50% of non-meal deviations to be negative, and the remaining 50-55% of deviations should be positive. (To exclude meal-related deviations, we exclude overly large deviations from the sample.) So if you’re outside of that range, you are probably running sensitive or resistant, and we want to adjust accordingly. The output of Continue reading >>

What Is An Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

What Is An Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

If you are taking rapid-acting insulin (sometimes called meal or bolus insulin, such as Novorapid, Humalog or Apidra), you educator may talk to you about the option of using an insulin sensitivity factor (ISF, for short) to better control your blood sugars. An ISF tells you how many mmol/l (or ‘blood sugar points’) 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by. You can use an ISF to calculate how much extra insulin you will need to take when your blood sugar is high, to bring it back into your target range. If you are eating a meal, this would be extra insulin you would need to take, on top of what you would normally take for that meal. As an example, if your ISF is 1:3, this means that 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by 3 mmol/l. If your ISF is 1:5, this means that 1 unit of rapid insulin will lower your blood sugar by 5 mmol/l. Everyone is different and will use different ISFs and blood sugar targets. You educator can help you figure out what your ISF and target range should be. Once you know what your ISF is, you can use the following steps to calculate how much extra insulin you will need to bring your blood sugar back into target range: Test blood sugar to get your current value Use current blood sugar – blood sugar target to find out how many mmol/l you need to come down to reach your target range Divide value from step 2 by your ISF. To practice, lets say that my ISF is 1:2 (1 unit of rapid insulin lowers my blood sugar by 2 mmol/l), and when I test my blood sugar, it is 12.0 mmol/l. I have set my target to be 6 mmol/l. I can use the steps from above: My blood sugar is 12.0 mmol/l 12.0 -6.0 = 6.0 My blood sugar needs to come down 6.0 mmol/l to reach my target 6.0 / 2 (my ISF) = 3 I will need to take 3 units of additional insulin Continue reading >>

Nsulin Sensitivity & Carbohydrate Ratio Calculator

Nsulin Sensitivity & Carbohydrate Ratio Calculator

The Insulin Sensitivity Factor is the number of mg/dL one unit of insulin lowers glucose: 1500* / Total Daily Dose of Insulin = ISF The Carbohydrate Ratio is the number of carbohydrate grams covered by one unit of insulin: 450 / Total Daily Dose of Insulin To use the insulin sensitivity factor calculate the difference between the current blood sugar (glucose) and the desired blood sugar. Then divide the result by the sensitivity factor. The result is the amount of insulin that needs to be added or subtracted from the premeal insulin dose. Example: Current blood sugar is 140, target blood sugar is 100. Insulin sensitivity factor is 20. Correction = (140-100)/20 = 2 *The 1500 Rule was developed by Dr. Paul C. Davidson, Medical Director of the Diabetes Treatment Center in Atlanta. All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither OBFocus.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary damages resulting in whole or part from any user's use of or reliance upon this material. Continue reading >>

How To Determine Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor

How To Determine Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor

For many people with diabetes, insulin injections are the key to keeping their blood sugar at normal levels. Getting the right amount of insulin can seem a bit tricky at first. This is where you’ll need to do some math to get the dose just right. The pancreas makes the hormone insulin. Insulin helps the body use sugar as an energy source. It also helps balance your blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes don’t make enough insulin. People with type 2 diabetes don’t properly use the insulin their bodies make. Taking insulin is necessary for people with type 1 diabetes, but it can also be important for people who have type 2 diabetes. An insulin dose that’s too high could lower your blood sugar too much. This can cause hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia occurs when your blood sugar falls below 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hypoglycemia can lead to a loss of consciousness and seizures. Learn more: Humalog vs. NovoLog: Important differences and more » An insulin dose that’s too low may not bring your blood sugar to the target level. The resulting high blood sugar is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia can lead to serious complications over time that can affect your: heart kidneys eyes nerves other organs You’ll need to know how sensitive you are to insulin to know the right dose of insulin to take. In other words, you’ll need to know how much insulin you need to lower your blood sugar by a certain amount. Insulin sensitivity isn’t the same for everyone. Some people with diabetes are more sensitive to insulin that others. In general, people with type 1 diabetes are more sensitive to insulin than people with type 2 diabetes. Your sensitivity to insulin can vary during the day based on your level of activity and your body’s rhythm of daily hormone se Continue reading >>

Adjusting Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Adjusting Insulin Sensitivity Factor (isf)

Correction insulin is an extra dose of insulin given to reduce high blood glucose. The correction factor, or Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF), specifies how much insulin is needed to correct blood glucose back to the target range. It is expressed as a ratio, such as 1:3, or 1:15, where the second number represents how much the blood glucose drops when 1 unit (the first number of the ratio) of rapid-acting insulin is given. For example, an ISF of 1:3 means one unit of insulin would drop the blood glucose by 3 mmol/L; an ISF of 1:15 means one unit of insulin would drop the blood glucose by 15 mmol/L. We often talk about ISF in terms of this second number alone, as in “my child’s ISF is 3”. The bolus calculator in an insulin pump uses a Correction Formula (much the same as you may have used if your child was previously on an injected Basal-Bolus with MDI program) to calculate how many units of insulin to deliver for an above-target blood glucose reading: Correction Insulin = Current BG – Target ISF It is informative, but not necessary, for you to understand how the pump uses this correction formula. What IS important is to understand the effect of changes to the ISF setting, as outlined below. Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

The drop in blood glucose level, measured in milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl), caused by each unit of insulin taken. Knowing their insulin sensitivity factor can help people with Type 1 diabetes to determine the dose of short-acting or rapid-acting insulin to take. Health-care professionals use the “1500 rule” to calculate insulin sensitivity factor for people who use Regular (short-acting) insulin. The 1500 rule works as follows: Divide 1500 by the total daily dose of Regular insulin, in units. For example, if a person’s total daily dose is 30 units of Regular insulin, his insulin sensitivity factor would be 50 (1500 ÷ 30). So one unit of Regular insulin would be estimated to lower his blood glucose by 50 mg/dl. Health-care professionals use the “1800 rule” to calculate insulin sensitivity factor for people who use the rapid-acting insulin analogs lispro (brand name Humalog), aspart (NovoLog), and glulisine (Apidra). This is done by dividing 1800 by the total daily dose of rapid-acting insulin. If the total daily insulin dose is 40 units, the insulin sensitivity factor would be 1800 divided by 40, or 45. Insulin sensitivity factor can be calculated only for people with Type 1 diabetes. It cannot be calculated reliably for people with Type 2 diabetes, whose pancreases often still make some insulin and who have varying degrees of insulin resistance. Continue reading >>

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

Insulin Correction Dose Calculator -beta

perinatology.com Please enable JavaScript to view all features on this site. Insulin Correction Dose Calculator Select the type of insulin, enter the total daily dose of insulin used, the carbohydrate content of the meal, and press 'calculate' button to estimate the amount of insulin needed to cover the carbohydrate content of the meal. All calculations must be confirmed before use. The suggested results are not a substitute for clinical judgment. Neither Perinatology.com nor any other party involved in the preparation or publication of this site shall be liable for any special, consequential, or exemplary Insulin Type Rapid acting Insulin (Humalog, Novolog) Short acting (Regular) Total Daily Dose of Insulin (TDD) units Carbohydrate Content of meal : grams Current Blood Glucose mg/dL Target Pre-Meal Blood Glucose mg/dL Carbohydrate Ratio = One unit of insulin covers grams of carbohydrate Insulin Sensitivity Factor (ISF) = One unit insulin decreases blood glucose by mg/dL Insulin required to cover carbohydrate in meal units Correction to Dose Of Insulin units Dose Of Insulin for meal units Meal related insulin boluses are calculated according to the carbohydrate content of the meal using the carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) The carbohydrate-to-insulin ratio (CIR) is the number of grams of carbohydrate that are covered by 1 unit of insulin. The CIR is calculated by dividing the constant 450 by the Total Daily Dose (TDD). The CIR may be different for different meals of the day. CIR-= 450 / TDD Example: TDD= 50 units insulin CIR= 450 /50 = 9 grams/unit The meal has 90 grams of carbohydrate Meal insulin bolus = carbohydrates/carbohydrate to insulin ratio CIR =90/9= 10 units If the post meal blood sugar is above the targeted blood sugar range for 2 to 3 days then consider Continue reading >>

Tag: Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Tag: Insulin Sensitivity Factor

I really and truly hated maths when I was in school, it’s quiet ironic that now my life revolves around numbers, equations and ratio’s. Initially my understanding of diabetes and numbers was zero. Insulin units, bolus, what?? I was totally clueless… As the years have gone by I’ve developed a much better appreciation for these numbers and how they work in relation to diabetes. “It’s hard to believe how essential these numbers have become.” Being a Type 1 diabetic numbers are all around me from the moment I wake up in the morning to check my blood glucose level to the time I go to bed. I sometimes wish I could just tuck into that slice of chocolate cake without having to calculate how much insulin I’ll need beforehand to maintain good blood glucose levels. Or if I find the motivation to do a workout that I don’t have the worry of my BGL’s plummeting to the point of no return. Of course this doesn’t happen, I usually have to set my insulin pump (basal rates) at a much lower rate and most of the time I have to either suspend my pump or detach it completely. You won’t believe that even that doesn’t prevent my BGL’s from dropping. Let’s face it, numbers are a part and parcel of my everyday life. I sometimes feel like a hawk gazing, waiting for the correct numbers to appear. In my case, to appear on my blood glucose monitor. The moment I lose focus of these numbers, I’m unable to tame them and keep them within my control. Understanding carbs, glycaemic indexes, Insulin to carb ratio (I: C), Insulin sensitivity factors (ISF), can get very confusing. Being able to understand them is extremely important in my diabetes management. For the non-diabetics who are probably thinking what is she talking about, let me explain how numbers have such a huge i Continue reading >>

Correction Factor | Diabetesnet.com

Correction Factor | Diabetesnet.com

The 1800 Rule For Determining Your Correction Factor When your blood sugar goes unexpectedly high, a correction bolus can be used to bring it down. To use the right correction bolus, you first determine your correction factor. The 1500 Rule for Regular was originally developed by Paul Davidson, M.D. in Atlanta, Georgia. Because the blood sugar tends to drop faster and farther on Humalog and Novolog insulins, we modified the 1500 Rule to an 1800 Rule for these insulins. (Some use a 2000 rule for these insulins.) The 1800 Rule shows how far your blood sugar is likely to drop per unit of Humalog and Novolog insulin. The 1500 Rule shows how far it will drop per unit of Regular. Numbers between 1600 and 2200 can be used to determine the correction factor. The number 1800 should work when the TDD is set correctly and the basal insulin makes up 50% of the TDD in someone with Type 1 diabetes. A number smaller than 1800 will work better when basal insulin doses make up less than 50% of the TDD, while a number higher than 1800 works better for those whose basal doses make up more than 50% of their TDD. Also recheck your TDD and basal percentage to make sure they are correctly set. Setting up your correction boluses can be done only after your basal doses have been tested for accuracy. If your basal doses are set too high, using a correction bolus may lead to lows, while basal doses that are too low will make it appear that correction boluses are not the right amount to bring high readings down as expected. Works for Type 1 diabetes and most Type 2s Estimates the point drop in mg/dl per unit of Humalog or Novolog 1800/TDD = point drop per unit of Humalog (see Table) Someone's Total Daily Dose of insulin = 30 units 1800/30 u/day = a 60 point drop per unit of Humalog The 1800 Rule Continue reading >>

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I been adjusting my correction bolus a bit this few day because i notice my insulin sensitivity factor changed a lot compare to when i was diagnosis, is this normal. Last time i was 2.1 mmol/L per unit now is 2.3 mmol/L per unit. I find my insulin sensitivity depends on my current BG. If I have a high BG (above 14), I need about 50% more insulin. I understand this is normal and should be taken into consideration for fear of over correcting when at a lower BG. However, if you have been recently diagnosed, this may Be due to a slow end to your honeymoon period and you may see this value increase over time. This is totally normal, you are most likely still in your honeymoon, when your insulin needs change dramatically. Expect this to continue for at least another few months. I'm 2.5 years in and still honeymooning! Your pancreas is still trying to produce a bit of insulin on its own, so sometimes you will go low for no reason, and other times your usual doses won't be enough. Over time your insulin needs will slowly increase as your pancreas loses its ability to make insulin. However, the honeymoon isn't all bad - having your own insulin production means that your body can help out if your blood sugar gets very high, that it will take more to put you in DKA, and that you are more likely to be able to recover from a bad hypo on your own (if your body can make a bit of insulin, it is more likely to be able to get your blood sugar back up on its own by producing glucagon. However, you should still treat hypos with sugary food and drink - this is just a backup and doctors don't know how long your body will be able to do this.) totally normal --- this is 1 ad Continue reading >>

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