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What Is The Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

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Correction Factor | Diabetesnet.com

The 1800 Rule For Determining Your Correction Factor When your blood sugar goes unexpectedly high, a correction bolus can be used to bring it down. To use the right correction bolus, you first determine your correction factor. The 1500 Rule for Regular was originally developed by Paul Davidson, M.D. in Atlanta, Georgia. Because the blood sugar tends to drop faster and farther on Humalog and Novolog insulins, we modified the 1500 Rule to an 1800 Rule for these insulins. (Some use a 2000 rule for these insulins.) The 1800 Rule shows how far your blood sugar is likely to drop per unit of Humalog and Novolog insulin. The 1500 Rule shows how far it will drop per unit of Regular. Numbers between 1600 and 2200 can be used to determine the correction factor. The number 1800 should work when the TDD is set correctly and the basal insulin makes up 50% of the TDD in someone with Type 1 diabetes. A number smaller than 1800 will work better when basal insulin doses make up less than 50% of the TDD, while a number higher than 1800 works better for those whose basal doses make up more than 50% of their TDD. Also recheck your TDD and basal percentage to make sure they are correctly set. Setting u Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rubymurry

    Hi!
    I feel very sheepish about asking this question. I should know the answer but I am a little confused. Well here goes- I understand my insulin to carb ratio is as follows: 10pm to 4am:1 .28, 4am to 10am: 1.22, 10am to 4pm: 1.18, and 4pm to 10pm: 1.15 I have just looked on the internet for how to gauge your insulin sensitivity factor, and it seems that you have to add your daily amount of insulin dosage and then divide by 1800 (This is because I am on Novo rapid, quick acting insulin) This was an American site, therefore I suspect that perhaps the figures are different when in UK. Also, my insulin varies each day, so do I take perhaps an average day re insulin intake? I am getting in a bit of a tizz. I feel very ignorant that I am not quite sure how to arrive at my ISF number. Another thing is that my insulin to carb ratio was put into my pump by a doctor, and at the time I was not really aware of all the technicalities that were involved with my pump. I donn't even know how these were worked out! Since joining all you lovely people, I want to be very informed as most of you are. I know it is a little foolish, but I would rather ask this question here, than make myself feel very silly and ask my diabetic team, who probably think I know everything!!! I have picked up alot of valuable information from this site, and I would greatly appreciate it if anyone out there can help me.

  2. diagonall

    Try rhis site
    Hiya,
    Have a look at this site it should explain things for you a bit better
    http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_food_diet/500rule.php
    Alot of it is trial and error though. Mine has altered a lot since I started pumping.
    Read pumping insulin too it is explained in there too I think.
    Hope the website helps.
    Do remember though to change one thing at a time and wait for a few days to see the result.
    Are you alos using the combination bolus and extended bolus as well to counter act the different effects of food on your body?

  3. rubymurry

    Thank you for your help. I know it does seem a little unusual that i did not really know about this. The pump I am using is the Animus 1200 which I am very happy with. However, I know that I have been just letting the pump work out dosage re carbohydrate intake. I do rely on it, and possibly has made me a little lazy!! It is so easy to enter carbs I am going to or have eaten, press the button to get insulin dosage, and hey presto the pump delivers the correct dosage. I do use combo bolus and the corrective bolus if my blood sugars are not within target. I have been coping fairly well in my ignorance, because my pump has the ability to do most things! However, I do need to know how to get to my ISF and my insulin to carb ratio. Than you again!!

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I wrote a program to help me calculate correction insulin dosages with meals.

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I been adjusting my correction bolus a bit this few day because i notice my insulin sensitivity factor changed a lot compare to when i was diagnosis, is this normal. Last time i was 2.1 mmol/L per unit now is 2.3 mmol/L per unit. I find my insulin sensitivity depends on my current BG. If I have a high BG (above 14), I need about 50% more insulin. I understand this is normal and should be taken into consideration for fear of over correcting when at a lower BG. However, if you have been recently diagnosed, this may Be due to a slow end to your honeymoon period and you may see this value increase over time. This is totally normal, you are most likely still in your honeymoon, when your insulin needs change dramatically. Expect this to continue for at least another few months. I'm 2.5 years in and still honeymooning! Your pancreas is still trying to produce a bit of insulin on its own, so sometimes you will go low for no reason, and other times your usual doses won't be enough. Over time your insulin needs will slowly increase as your pancreas loses its ability to mak Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. rubymurry

    Hi!
    I feel very sheepish about asking this question. I should know the answer but I am a little confused. Well here goes- I understand my insulin to carb ratio is as follows: 10pm to 4am:1 .28, 4am to 10am: 1.22, 10am to 4pm: 1.18, and 4pm to 10pm: 1.15 I have just looked on the internet for how to gauge your insulin sensitivity factor, and it seems that you have to add your daily amount of insulin dosage and then divide by 1800 (This is because I am on Novo rapid, quick acting insulin) This was an American site, therefore I suspect that perhaps the figures are different when in UK. Also, my insulin varies each day, so do I take perhaps an average day re insulin intake? I am getting in a bit of a tizz. I feel very ignorant that I am not quite sure how to arrive at my ISF number. Another thing is that my insulin to carb ratio was put into my pump by a doctor, and at the time I was not really aware of all the technicalities that were involved with my pump. I donn't even know how these were worked out! Since joining all you lovely people, I want to be very informed as most of you are. I know it is a little foolish, but I would rather ask this question here, than make myself feel very silly and ask my diabetic team, who probably think I know everything!!! I have picked up alot of valuable information from this site, and I would greatly appreciate it if anyone out there can help me.

  2. diagonall

    Try rhis site
    Hiya,
    Have a look at this site it should explain things for you a bit better
    http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_food_diet/500rule.php
    Alot of it is trial and error though. Mine has altered a lot since I started pumping.
    Read pumping insulin too it is explained in there too I think.
    Hope the website helps.
    Do remember though to change one thing at a time and wait for a few days to see the result.
    Are you alos using the combination bolus and extended bolus as well to counter act the different effects of food on your body?

  3. rubymurry

    Thank you for your help. I know it does seem a little unusual that i did not really know about this. The pump I am using is the Animus 1200 which I am very happy with. However, I know that I have been just letting the pump work out dosage re carbohydrate intake. I do rely on it, and possibly has made me a little lazy!! It is so easy to enter carbs I am going to or have eaten, press the button to get insulin dosage, and hey presto the pump delivers the correct dosage. I do use combo bolus and the corrective bolus if my blood sugars are not within target. I have been coping fairly well in my ignorance, because my pump has the ability to do most things! However, I do need to know how to get to my ISF and my insulin to carb ratio. Than you again!!

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Welcome to Type 1 and Joe Solowiejczyk proudly present Diabetes Chalk Talk # 3. For all five Chalk Talks and much more, visit us at www.welcometotype1.com.

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community The ISF on my pump was initially setup at 1:3 when I first started on the pump. But last week the nurse wasn't happy with the speed at which the correction boluses were taking effect so did a recalculation of the ISF for me. I'm now finding that the correction boluses are sending me low so am just going to split the difference between the 1:3 I was on before, the 1:2 that she changed me to and set it up as 1:2.5 and see how that goes. They seemed to use an incredibly crude method of figuring it out though, just dividing the average total daily dose of insulin into 100. That doesn't sound a particularly good way of figuring out how sensitive you are to insulin when it is not taking into account other factors, such as how much your eating or exercising. All I can find online about how to figure out the sensitivity is just similar calculations, although using the US units mostly. Can anyone explain the thinking behind such a basic method of figuring it out? Am I missing something obvious in how they come up with the numbers? I might be wrong here Spideog but I don't Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. dj7110

    Insulin Sensitivity Factor Number

    How do I calculate my insulin sensivity factor number? Mine is currently 22, and I strongly believe it needs to be adjusted, and don't know what equation is used to come up with the IFC number. My dr has been on me to get my sugars in better control before my surgery. And I'm totally stressed out trying to and can't figure out why other than my ISF number I use for my humalog that I was first started on might be a bit off. I've had a rough time of it last few weeks. Don't want to sound like a complainer or anything like that, but due to my circumstances it's important to get my sugars in better control.

  2. dj7110

    my carb ratio is also 10, I agree.. have enough trying to figure up with what to take.. so just giving off last weeks readings of my insulin intake, and carb intake, as well as b/s readings from now on and letting the diabetic center do the calculations for me.. a lot easier.

  3. dj7110

    actually I'm a type 2, which is why I never understood this calibration on this number and why it doesn't seem to work properly for me.. I got ahold of the diabetic center that orriginally configured my way to take my humalog to refigure it and sure enough I'm off from where I am now. My doctor upped my humalog to 55 units a day and the new number i'm using in figuring my humalog is 18. hopefully I will be having beter results now with the increases in my insulin.. I see the surgeon this week for my surgery but it won't be scheduled till after my heart stress test. So hopefully my numbers will be running a lot better by than. Thanx for all the input & help. this place is awesome. David

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