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What Is The Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

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zipps are the newest addition to our insulin pump accessories line. What's great about these cases is that they have a hidden button hole in the back that allows you to feed the tubing through the back of the case. this case can be worn close to the body and will stay snug and secure during activities so it's also great for sports. The perfect way to wear your insulin pump during sports or for everyday use. http://www.pumpwearinc.com/pumpshop/i...

Programming Your Pump

Learn to program different patterns to meet different needs. Some examples that might prompt additional programming are: weekend or shift work, exercise, hormonal fluctuations, or travel. You can pre-program your insulin pump to deliver a tiny amount of insulin every few minutes in a cycle of 24 hours. This is known as a basal rate pattern. Basal insulin rates The basal rate replaces the insulin that your body is not producing naturally. The rate is programmed as unit(s) per half hour or per hour. You can program different patterns to meet different needs. Some examples that might prompt additional programming are: weekend or shift work, exercise, hormonal fluctuations, or travel. The basal infusion occurs automatically; it just keeps delivering insulin in the pre-programmed pattern until you decide to change the rate. Bolus insulin You can also pre-program your insulin pump with the bolus settings, including the insulin to carbohydrate ratios, bolus infusion profiles, and insulin sensitivity factor. Insulin-to-carbohydrate ratio is programmed as 1 unit of insulin per number of carbohydrate grams. This means that 1 unit of insulin will dispose of so many grams of carbohydrate. Mult Continue reading >>

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  1. dj7110

    Insulin Sensitivity Factor Number

    How do I calculate my insulin sensivity factor number? Mine is currently 22, and I strongly believe it needs to be adjusted, and don't know what equation is used to come up with the IFC number. My dr has been on me to get my sugars in better control before my surgery. And I'm totally stressed out trying to and can't figure out why other than my ISF number I use for my humalog that I was first started on might be a bit off. I've had a rough time of it last few weeks. Don't want to sound like a complainer or anything like that, but due to my circumstances it's important to get my sugars in better control.

  2. dj7110

    my carb ratio is also 10, I agree.. have enough trying to figure up with what to take.. so just giving off last weeks readings of my insulin intake, and carb intake, as well as b/s readings from now on and letting the diabetic center do the calculations for me.. a lot easier.

  3. dj7110

    actually I'm a type 2, which is why I never understood this calibration on this number and why it doesn't seem to work properly for me.. I got ahold of the diabetic center that orriginally configured my way to take my humalog to refigure it and sure enough I'm off from where I am now. My doctor upped my humalog to 55 units a day and the new number i'm using in figuring my humalog is 18. hopefully I will be having beter results now with the increases in my insulin.. I see the surgeon this week for my surgery but it won't be scheduled till after my heart stress test. So hopefully my numbers will be running a lot better by than. Thanx for all the input & help. this place is awesome. David

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Welcome to Type 1 and Joe Solowiejczyk proudly present Diabetes Chalk Talk # 3. For all five Chalk Talks and much more, visit us at www.welcometotype1.com.

Insulin Sensitivity Factor

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I been adjusting my correction bolus a bit this few day because i notice my insulin sensitivity factor changed a lot compare to when i was diagnosis, is this normal. Last time i was 2.1 mmol/L per unit now is 2.3 mmol/L per unit. I find my insulin sensitivity depends on my current BG. If I have a high BG (above 14), I need about 50% more insulin. I understand this is normal and should be taken into consideration for fear of over correcting when at a lower BG. However, if you have been recently diagnosed, this may Be due to a slow end to your honeymoon period and you may see this value increase over time. This is totally normal, you are most likely still in your honeymoon, when your insulin needs change dramatically. Expect this to continue for at least another few months. I'm 2.5 years in and still honeymooning! Your pancreas is still trying to produce a bit of insulin on its own, so sometimes you will go low for no reason, and other times your usual doses won't be enough. Over time your insulin needs will slowly increase as your pancreas loses its ability to mak Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. dj7110

    Insulin Sensitivity Factor Number

    How do I calculate my insulin sensivity factor number? Mine is currently 22, and I strongly believe it needs to be adjusted, and don't know what equation is used to come up with the IFC number. My dr has been on me to get my sugars in better control before my surgery. And I'm totally stressed out trying to and can't figure out why other than my ISF number I use for my humalog that I was first started on might be a bit off. I've had a rough time of it last few weeks. Don't want to sound like a complainer or anything like that, but due to my circumstances it's important to get my sugars in better control.

  2. dj7110

    my carb ratio is also 10, I agree.. have enough trying to figure up with what to take.. so just giving off last weeks readings of my insulin intake, and carb intake, as well as b/s readings from now on and letting the diabetic center do the calculations for me.. a lot easier.

  3. dj7110

    actually I'm a type 2, which is why I never understood this calibration on this number and why it doesn't seem to work properly for me.. I got ahold of the diabetic center that orriginally configured my way to take my humalog to refigure it and sure enough I'm off from where I am now. My doctor upped my humalog to 55 units a day and the new number i'm using in figuring my humalog is 18. hopefully I will be having beter results now with the increases in my insulin.. I see the surgeon this week for my surgery but it won't be scheduled till after my heart stress test. So hopefully my numbers will be running a lot better by than. Thanx for all the input & help. this place is awesome. David

  4. -> Continue reading
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I wrote a program to help me calculate correction insulin dosages with meals.

What’s Your Insulin Sensitivity Factor?

Whether you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, if you’re taking insulin via pump, pen, or syringe, you need to know your “insulin sensitivity factor” or “correction factor.” Without knowing this number, you don’t know how much insulin you need to correct a high blood sugar and risk either going far too low after an injection or simply not going low enough to meet the goal of a healthy blood sugar level. What is an “Insulin Sensitivity Factor”? A ISF (insulin sensitivity factor) is the number of points in your blood sugar by which 1 unit of insulin will reduce your blood sugar. For instance, my ISF is 1:100, which means that if my blood sugar is 200 mg/dL and I want to take a correction dose to bring it down to 125 mg/dL, I would need to take .75 units of insulin. Depending on your level of activity, insulin sensitivity or insulin resistance, your age, your diet, the amount of carbohydrates you consume on a daily basis, and your bodyweight, your ISF could range anywhere from 2 to 200! Children are obviously far more sensitive to insulin than grown adults. Teenagers tend to have higher insulin needs than adults because of growth hormones, and those with type 2 diabetes a Continue reading >>

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  1. rubymurry

    Hi!
    I feel very sheepish about asking this question. I should know the answer but I am a little confused. Well here goes- I understand my insulin to carb ratio is as follows: 10pm to 4am:1 .28, 4am to 10am: 1.22, 10am to 4pm: 1.18, and 4pm to 10pm: 1.15 I have just looked on the internet for how to gauge your insulin sensitivity factor, and it seems that you have to add your daily amount of insulin dosage and then divide by 1800 (This is because I am on Novo rapid, quick acting insulin) This was an American site, therefore I suspect that perhaps the figures are different when in UK. Also, my insulin varies each day, so do I take perhaps an average day re insulin intake? I am getting in a bit of a tizz. I feel very ignorant that I am not quite sure how to arrive at my ISF number. Another thing is that my insulin to carb ratio was put into my pump by a doctor, and at the time I was not really aware of all the technicalities that were involved with my pump. I donn't even know how these were worked out! Since joining all you lovely people, I want to be very informed as most of you are. I know it is a little foolish, but I would rather ask this question here, than make myself feel very silly and ask my diabetic team, who probably think I know everything!!! I have picked up alot of valuable information from this site, and I would greatly appreciate it if anyone out there can help me.

  2. diagonall

    Try rhis site
    Hiya,
    Have a look at this site it should explain things for you a bit better
    http://www.diabetesnet.com/diabetes_food_diet/500rule.php
    Alot of it is trial and error though. Mine has altered a lot since I started pumping.
    Read pumping insulin too it is explained in there too I think.
    Hope the website helps.
    Do remember though to change one thing at a time and wait for a few days to see the result.
    Are you alos using the combination bolus and extended bolus as well to counter act the different effects of food on your body?

  3. rubymurry

    Thank you for your help. I know it does seem a little unusual that i did not really know about this. The pump I am using is the Animus 1200 which I am very happy with. However, I know that I have been just letting the pump work out dosage re carbohydrate intake. I do rely on it, and possibly has made me a little lazy!! It is so easy to enter carbs I am going to or have eaten, press the button to get insulin dosage, and hey presto the pump delivers the correct dosage. I do use combo bolus and the corrective bolus if my blood sugars are not within target. I have been coping fairly well in my ignorance, because my pump has the ability to do most things! However, I do need to know how to get to my ISF and my insulin to carb ratio. Than you again!!

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