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What Is The Generic Name For Levemir?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Detemir (levemir, Levemir Flexpen)?

What Are The Possible Side Effects Of Insulin Detemir (levemir, Levemir Flexpen)?

A A A Medications and Drugs Brand Names: Levemir, Levemir FlexPen Generic Name: insulin detemir (Pronunciation: IN su lin DE te mir) What is the most important information I should know about insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? What is insulin detemir (Levemir, Levemir FlexPen)? Insulin detemir is a man-made form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin detemir is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin detemir is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Insulin detemir is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Insulin detemir may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Call your doctor at once if you have a serious side effect such as: itching, swelling, or redness where you inject insulin detemir; swelling in your hands or feet; or low potassium (confusion, uneven heart rate, extreme thirst, increased urination, leg discomfort, muscle weakness or limp feeling). Less serious side effects may include: thickening of the skin where you inject insulin detemir; weight gain; stomach pain; or flu symptoms, or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA- Continue reading >>

Levemir Side Effects Center

Levemir Side Effects Center

Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat diabetes in adults and children. Common side effects of Levemir include: injection site reactions (e.g., pain, redness, irritation), swelling of the hands/feet, thickening of the skin where you inject Levemir, weight gain, headache, back pain, stomach pain, flu symptoms, or cold symptoms such as stuffy nose, sneezing, sore throat. Tell your doctor if you experience serious side effects of Levemir including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, or irregular heartbeat). Levemir is for once- or twice-daily subcutaneous (under the skin) administration. Patients treated with Levemir once-daily should administer the dose with the evening meal or at bedtime. Patients requiring twice-daily dosing can administer the evening dose with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours after the morning dose. Levemir may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, guanethidine, or beta-blockers. Other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin Levemir on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Levemir. Discuss a plan for managing your blood sugars with your doctor before you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is not known if this medication passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Our Levemir (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. T Continue reading >>

Drug Encyclopedia | Kaiser Permanente

Drug Encyclopedia | Kaiser Permanente

Learn about prescription and over-the-counter drugs how they work, possible side effects, and more. Don't see the drug you are looking for? Type the full drug name in the search box above. Don't know the drug name? Put asterisks before or after parts of the name you know (ex: *benzo*). Choose another search set, or input a search term If you suspect an overdose, contact your local poison control center or emergency room immediately. You can also call the National Poison Hotline at 1-800-222-1222 (toll free) or 711 (TTY). This information is intended to supplement, not substitute for, the expertise and judgment of your health care professional. The information is not intended to cover all possible uses, directions, precautions, drug interactions, or adverse effects, nor should it be construed to indicate that use of a particular drug is safe, appropriate, or effective for you. You should consult your health care professional before taking any drug, changing your diet, or commencing or discontinuing any course of treatment. First Databank disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information. Explore reliable information about the safe, effective use of vitamins, herbs, and other supplements and how they interact with other medications. Find out about drugs approved by the Kaiser Permanente Pharmacy and Therapeutics Committee for use in your care. Continue reading >>

Generic Levemir Availability

Generic Levemir Availability

Levemir is a brand name of insulin detemir, approved by the FDA in the following formulation(s): LEVEMIR (insulin detemir recombinant - injectable;subcutaneous) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Manufacturer: NOVO NORDISK INC Approval date: June 16, 2005 Strength(s): 300 UNITS/3ML (100 UNITS/ML) Has a generic version of Levemir been approved? No. There is currently no therapeutically equivalent version of Levemir available in the United States. Note: Fraudulent online pharmacies may attempt to sell an illegal generic version of Levemir. These medications may be counterfeit and potentially unsafe. If you purchase medications online, be sure you are buying from a reputable and valid online pharmacy. Ask your health care provider for advice if you are unsure about the online purchase of any medication. See also: Generic Drug FAQs. Patents are granted by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office at any time during a drug's development and may include a wide range of claims. Acylated insulin Patent 5,750,497 Issued: May 12, 1998 Inventor(s): Havelund; Svend & Halstr.o slashed.m; John & Jonassen; Ib & Andersen; Asser Sloth & Markussen; Jan Assignee(s): Novo Nordisk A/S The present invention relates to human insulin derivatives having a protracted profile of action in which the A21 and B3 amino acid residues are, independently, any amino acid residue which can be coded for by the genetic code except Lys, Arg and Cys; Phe.sup.B1 may be deleted; the B30 amino acid residue is (a) a non-codable, lipophilic amino acid having from 10 to 24 carbon atoms in which case an acyl group of a carboxylic acid with up to 5 carbon Continue reading >>

Levemir Side Effects

Levemir Side Effects

Generic Name: insulin detemir (IN su lin DE te mir) Brand Names: Levemir, Levemir FlexPen What is Levemir? Levemir (insulin detemir) is a man-made form of insulin, a hormone that is produced in the body. Insulin works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin detemir is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Levemir is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Levemir is used to treat type 2 diabetes in adults. Levemir is also used to treat type 1 diabetes in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Important information You should not use Levemir if you are allergic to insulin detemir, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with a short-acting insulin). Never share a Levemir injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Many other drugs can potentially interfere with the effects of Levemir. It is extremely important that you tell your doctor about all the prescription and over-the-counter medications you use. This includes prescription, over-the-counter, vitamin, and herbal products. Do not start a new medication without telling your doctor. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) can occur if you skip a meal, exercise too long, drink alcohol, or are under stress. An insulin overdose can cause life-threatening hypoglycemia. Know the signs of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) and how to recognize them: headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, or trouble concentrating. Be sure your family and close friends know how to help you in an emergency. Before taking this medicine You should not use Levemir if you are allergic to insulin detemir, or if you Continue reading >>

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

High-alert Medications - Levemir (insulin Detemir)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Levemir is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Levemir When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Levemir is a long-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin once or twice daily. (When taken in smaller doses, Levemir may be considered an intermediate-acting insulin.) When Levemir is taken once daily, inject the insulin with the evening meal or at bedtime. When taken twice daily, the evening dose should be taken with the evening meal, at bedtime, or 12 hours following the morning dose. 2. Prepare your insulin. A rapid- or short-acting insulin is often prescribed with Levemir. However, Levemir should never be mixed in the same syringe with other insulins before injection. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don't reuse or recycle. Discard used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle, sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Don't reuse or recycle syringes, needles, or lancets. 4. Don't share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. t Avoid mix-ups. If you use more t Continue reading >>

Levemir

Levemir

LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin]) Injection DESCRIPTION LEVEMIR® (insulin detemir [rDNA origin] injection) is a sterile solution of insulin detemir for use as a subcutaneous injection. Insulin detemir is a long-acting (up to 24-hour duration of action) recombinant human insulin analog. LEVEMIR® is produced by a process that includes expression of recombinant DNA in Saccharomyces cerevisiae followed by chemical modification. Insulin detemir differs from human insulin in that the amino acid threonine in position B30 has been omitted, and a C14 fatty acid chain has been attached to the amino acid B29. Insulin detemir has a molecular formula of C267H402O76N64S6 and a molecular weight of 5916.9. It has the following structure: Figure 1: Structural Formula of insulin detemir LEVEMIR® is a clear, colorless, aqueous, neutral sterile solution. Each milliliter of LEVEMIR® contains 100 units (14.2 mg/mL) insulin detemir, 65.4 mcg zinc, 2.06 mg m-cresol, 16.0 mg glycerol, 1.80 mg phenol, 0.89 mg disodium phosphate dihydrate, 1.17 mg sodium chloride, and water for injection. Hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide may be added to adjust pH. LEVEMIR® has a pH of approximately 7.4. Continue reading >>

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

‘generic’ Basaglar Is Cheaper Than Lantus But Does It Work?

Basaglar U-100 insulin glargine, which is a follow-on biologic insulin to Lantus is now available by prescription in the US. Basaglar, from Eli Lilly and Company and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. is not technically a generic to Lantus but it does have an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus and has been FDA approved as a long-acting insulin for patients of all ages with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. David Kendall, M.D. and the vice president of Global Medical Affairs for Lilly Diabetes said in Lilly’s press release, “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” and that “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” Is it Cheaper? Business Insider reported that Basaglar “is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk.” An Eli Lilly spokesperson told Business Insider that before discounts or insurance coverage, the list price for a 5-pen pack of Basaglar is $316.85. You will be able to get Basaglar from retail and mail order pharmacies. Basaglar has also been chosen for the formularies of the top three pharmacy benefit managers and is expected to be covered by many commercial insurance plans. The pharmacy benefit manager CVS Health has dropped Lantus and replaced it with Basaglar for their next year’s formulary. In their announcement, CVS Health stated that th Continue reading >>

Insulin Brand & Generic Names

Insulin Brand & Generic Names

Category: / Brand Name: Rapid Acting / Apidra, Humalog, NovoLog Short Acting / Humulin R, Novolin R Intermediate Acting / Humulin N, Novolin N Long Acting / Lantus, Levemir Ultra Long Acting / Tresiba Onset of Action: / Duration of Action: 15-30 mins / 3-6 hrs 30-60 mins / 6-10 hrs 1-2 hrs / 16-24 hrs 1-2 hrs / 24 hrs 1 hour / 24-40 hrs Continue reading >>

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus And Levemir: What’s The Difference?

Lantus and Levemir have a lot in common. Both are basal insulin formulas, which means that they last for a long time in the body and act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low output of insulin produced by a healthy pancreas. Both are insulin analogues, which means that their insulin molecules are analogous to human insulin, but engineered, or recombined, with slight differences that slow their absorption. Lantus is a clear formula made with glargine, a genetically modified form of human insulin, dissolved in a special solution. Levemir is also a clear formula, but it contains dissolved detemir, a different form of genetically modified insulin. Human insulin is made of two amino acid chains, called A and B, that have two disulfide bonds between them. In glargine, one amino acid has been switched out, and two extra amino acids have been added to one end of the B chain. The modifications make glargine soluble at an acidic pH, but much less soluble at the neutral pH that’s found in the body To make Lantus, first the glargine is produced by a vat of E. coli bacteria. Then it’s purified and added to a watery solution containing a little zinc and some glycerol; a dash of hydrochloric acid is also added to make it acidic, bringing its pH down to about 4. At that degree of acidity, glargine completely dissolves into the watery solution, which is why the vial is clear. After you inject it into your subcutaneous tissue, the acidic solution is neutralized by your body to a neutral pH. Because glargine is not soluble at a neutral pH, it precipitates out into a form that’s not soluble in subcutaneous fat, and there forms a relatively insoluble depot. From that pool, or depot, of precipitated glargine in the tissues, small amounts slowly move back Continue reading >>

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Comprehensive List Of Diabetes Medications

Understanding Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Diabetes occurs when your body no longer makes or uses insulin as it’s intended to. Insulin is a naturally occurring substance in the body, but some people don’t make enough of it or their cells become insulin resistant. Diabetic patients must manage higher than normal blood sugar (or glucose) levels in the body. Diabetes is classified into two types (Type 1 and Type 2). Diabetics of both types require medicines to normalize blood glucose levels. If the doctor says you’re diabetic, he or she will prescribe drugs for Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. It’s good to know about the universe of treatment options diabetics have today. Here’s a comprehensive list of available diabetes medications along with links to Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes medication prices that will help you save up to 90% off U.S. retail prices. You may also find our Cheat Sheet helpful: 12 Ways to Save Money on Your Diabetes Medications [Cheat Sheet] Type 1 Diabetes Medications Short-Action Insulin Brand names: Novolin and Humulin (regular insulin) are two commonly prescribed, short-acting drugs your doctor may prescribe. Rapid-Action Insulin Brand names: Levemir FlexPen and NovoLog Flexpen are two commonly prescribed rapid action insulins. Brand name: Humalog Pen (insulin lispro) Brand name: Apidra (insulin glulisine) Intermediate-Action Insulin Brand name: Novolin N and Humulin N Pen (insulin isophane) are two intermediate-action insulins your doctor may prescribe. Long-Action Insulin Brand name Tresiba (insulin degludec) Brand name Levemir Flexpen (insulin detemir) Brand name Lantus Vials (insulin glargine) Brand name Toujeo (insulin glargine) Combination Medications Insulin Brand name: Ryzodeg Brand name: NovoLog Mix 70/30 Brand name: Novolin 70/30 Brand na Continue reading >>

Generic Levemir

Generic Levemir

Levemir ( insulin detemir ) is a prescription diabetes medication . It is a long-acting form of insulin that is approved to treat both type 1 and type 2 diabetes . Levemir is made by Novo Nordisk. At this time, generic Levemir has not been approved in the United States. This is a difficult question to answer. There are at least two major obstacles preventing generic Levemir from becoming available. First, several unexpired patents protect the drug. The first of these patents is currently set to expire in February 2014. Second, Levemir is considered a "biologic" medication and is, therefore, under different rules and laws than most other medications. At this point, generic biologics, including generic Levemir, are not allowed to be manufactured in the United States. Currently, legislation is under way that may change the laws concerning generic biologics (including insulin), but it is not clear when (or even if) this may happen. Is Insulin Detemir the Same as Generic Levemir? No -- insulin detemir is the active ingredient in Levemir, but is not a generic version of it. What can be confusing is that, oftentimes, the active ingredient of a drug is referred to as the "generic name." The generic name is different from a generic version of a medicine. In order for there to be a generic version of a medicine, the original medicine must have gone off-patent and another company besides the original manufacturer must make the product. Continue reading >>

Today Is The Day

Today Is The Day

Do not share your Levemir® FlexTouch® with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should check them. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Never inject Levemir® into a vein or muscle. Do not share your Levemir FlexTouch with other people, even if the needle has been changed. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a serious infection from them. Who should not take Levemir®? Do not take Levemir® if: you have an allergy to Levemir® or any of the ingredients in Levemir®. Before taking Levemir®, tell your health care provider about all your medical conditions including, if you are: pregnant, plan to become pregnant, or are breastfeeding. taking new prescription or over-the-counter medicines, including supplements. Talk to your health care provider about how to manage low blood sugar. How should I take Levemir®? Read the Instructions for Use and take exactly as directed. Know the type and strength of your insulin. Do not change your insulin type unless your health care provider tells you to. Check your blood sugar levels. Ask your health care provider what your blood sugar levels should be and when you should ch Continue reading >>

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Cheaper Version Of The Lifesaving Diabetes Medication Just Launched In The Us

A Type 1 diabetes patient holds up bottles of insulin.Reuters/Lucy Nicholson A new form of insulin just hit American markets. It's called Basaglar, and it is 15% less than the list price of Lantus and Toujeo, two long-acting insulins made by Sanofi Aventis, 21% less than the list price of Levemir, and 28% less than Tresiba, two long-acting insulins made by Novo Nordisk. Basaglar was approved in December 2015, but had to wait a year before launching on Thursday. A spokeswoman for Eli Lilly, the company that makes Basaglar and other insulins, told Business Insider that the list price for a pack of 5 pens is $316.85 — that's before any discounts, or factoring in what insurance might cover. It is part of a group of medications called "follow-on biologics" and together, they are expected to save the US billions of dollars over the next decade. Why there's no generic form of insulin For people living with Type 1 diabetes and some who live with Type 2, injections of insulin — a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food — are a necessary part of daily life. And insulin, in one form or another, has been around since the 1920s. But because it's made of living cells, it’s what doctors call a biologic product, and it's more complicated and difficult to manufacture than the medicines most often produced generically. That's why Basaglar isn't considered a generic, it's called a "follow-on biologic." Others taking this approach have gotten approved as biosimilars, and like Basaglar have come in at a slight discount — roughly 15% — off the list price of the original drug. To become a follow-on biologic, Basaglar had to show that its version of the drug was "sufficiently similar to Lantus to scientifically justify reliance," and the drug had to be tested Continue reading >>

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir Vs. Lantus: Similarities And Differences

Levemir and Lantus are both long-acting injectable insulins that can be used for long-term management of diabetes. Insulin is a hormone that is naturally produced in the body by the pancreas. It helps convert the glucose (sugar) in your bloodstream into energy. This energy is then distributed to cells throughout your body. With diabetes, your pancreas produces little or no insulin or your body is unable to use the insulin correctly. Without insulin, your body can’t use the sugars in your blood and can become starved for energy. The excess sugar in your blood can also damage different parts of your body, including your blood vessels and kidneys. Everyone with type 1 diabetes and many people with type 2 diabetes must use insulin to maintain healthy blood sugar levels. Levemir is a solution of insulin detemir, and Lantus is a solution of insulin glargine. Both are basal insulin formulas. That means that they work slowly to lower your blood sugar levels. They’re both absorbed into your body over a 24-hour period. They keep blood sugar levels lowered for longer than short-acting insulins do. Although the formulations are slightly different, Levemir and Lantus are very similar drugs. There are only a few differences between them. Children and adults can use both Levemir and Lantus. Specifically, Levemir can be used by people who are 2 years or older. Lantus can be used by people who are 6 years or older. Levemir or Lantus can help with daily management of diabetes. However, you may still need to use short-acting insulin to treat spikes in your blood sugar levels and diabetic ketoacidosis (a dangerous buildup of acids in your blood). Learn more: All about diabetic ketoacidosis » Administration Both Levemir and Lantus are given through injection in the same way. You can gi Continue reading >>

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