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What Is The Gauge Of Insulin Needle?

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

Do I Need A Longer Insulin Needle?

I have been injecting insulin for two years. My question is about needle length. I’ve used a U-100 31-gauge, 8-mm “short” needle because—well, it should hurt less, right? Because I am slightly obese, should I use the 29-gauge, 12.7-mm needle instead? Continue reading >>

Ready, Aim, Inject!

Ready, Aim, Inject!

All About Needles and Syringes Insulin and other injectable drugs are important tools for the management of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. Insulin is, of course, required for the treatment of Type 1 diabetes, and it is often needed to treat Type 2 diabetes when oral drugs and lifestyle measures no longer adequately control blood glucose levels. Even if you don’t currently take insulin, there’s a decent chance that you will in the future. Many people are understandably uneasy about the idea of giving themselves injections. Learning more about how insulin injections work, however, usually helps alleviate some fears and concerns. Even if you already take insulin and aren’t experiencing any problems, you may be able to make the process more comfortable or convenient — and head off future problems — by learning more about the process. This article provides an overview of the tools and techniques for giving insulin injections. Pens versus syringes Currently, the only way insulin can be delivered to the body is by injection, using either a syringe or an insulin pen, by infusion, using an insulin pump, or via inhalation (not discussed in this article). While there are companies working to develop forms of insulin that can be taken as a pill, none of these products are currently available to consumers. For decades, a syringe was the only option for injection, until 1985 when the NovoPen was introduced by the company that is now Novo Nordisk. Insulin pens allow users to “dial in” an insulin dose for injection, a process that is generally much faster than measuring a dose with a vial and syringe. The majority of pens are prefilled with insulins and are disposable, with a few available that have replaceable cartridges. Unlike insulin syringes, which come with a fixe Continue reading >>

Does Needle Size Matter?

Does Needle Size Matter?

Go to: Abstract Hypodermic needles are in widespread use, but patients are unhappy with the pain, anxiety, and difficulty of using them. To increase patient acceptance, smaller needle diameters and lower insertion forces have been shown to reduce the frequency of painful injections. Guided by these observations, fine needles and microneedles have been developed to minimize pain and have found the greatest utility for delivery of vaccines and biopharmaceuticals such as insulin. However, pain reduction must be balanced against limitations of injection depth, volume, and formulations introduced by reduced needle dimensions. In some cases, needle-free delivery methods provide useful alternatives. Keywords: drug delivery, hypodermic needle, insulin delivery methods, microneedle injection, needle gauge, needle length, pain from needle insertion Go to: Hypodermic Needles The hypodermic needle was invented independently by Charles Gabriel Pravaz in France and by Alexander Wood in England in 1853.1 Since then, needles have become the most widely used medical device, with an estimated 16 billion injections administered worldwide.2 Currently, needles are available in a wide range of lengths and gauges (i.e., diameters) either to enable delivery of drugs, vaccines, and other substances into the body or for extraction of fluids and tissue (Figures 1 and 2). The appropriate needle gauge and length are determined by a number of factors, including the target tissue, injection formulation, and patient population. For example, venipuncture requires the use of needles typically as large as 22–21 gauge inserted to depths of 25–38 mm to withdraw milliliters of blood.3 In contrast, vaccines usually require injection of less than 1 ml of fluid and, therefore, 25- to 22-gauge needles with Continue reading >>

Bd™ Insulin Syringes

Bd™ Insulin Syringes

Source: BD Diabetes Healthcare BD is the leading brand of insulin syringes. It is the brand most recommended by health care professionals. BD insulin syringes are available in a variety of sizes so that you can choose the right BD insulin syringe size for your patient. Needle gauge-the higher the number, the thinner the needle. Does your patient prefer to have the thinnest needle available or a thicker one that is less flexible? BD insulin syringe needles are available in three gauges: Needle length-BD insulin syringes are available with 2 different length needles: the standard ½" length (12.7mm) and the short 5/16" length (8mm) which is 37% shorter. The psychological benefits of a short needle may make the transition to insulin easier for some patients. Short needles are appropriate for approximately 82% of patients with diabetes; not just children or lean adults. Note: a patient's blood sugar levels should be carefully monitored and evaluated after changing to a shorter needle Maximum Dose- BD Ultra-Fine II, BD Ultra-fine and BD Micro-fine needle syringes are all available in three dose capacities: To make it easier to measure an accurate dose, choose the smallest syringe that will hold the largest dose your patient takes. The BD insulin syringe product line BD Ultra-fine™ II Short Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328418 08290328418 1/2cc (50 unit) 328468 08290328468 3/10cc (30 unit) 328438 08290328438 BD Ultra-Fine™ Original Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328411 08290328411 1/2cc (50 unit) 328466 08290328466 3/10cc (30 unit) 328431 08290328431 BD Micro-Fine™ IV Syringe Needle Catalog # NDC # 1cc (100 unit) 328410 08290328410 1/2cc (50 unit) 328465 08290328465 3/10cc (30 unit) 328430 08290328430 BD products can not be purchased direc Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Needles

Insulin Pen Needles

Tweet Insulin pen needles and disposable syringes come in a variety of lengths and widths to suit all body types. Needles used to be long and sharp, but due to evolutions in technology, needles are now small, thin and quite often pain-free. From 12mm to 4mm, the needle length you choose is likely to be dictated by your size. Children will likely benefit from the shorter 6mm size. Your healthcare team should be able to advise you on which is best your body shape. When it comes to injecting, it is essential to get the right kit and use the right technique to reduce any pain. Hence, be careful not to fall into sloppy habits, such as failing to rotate your insulin injection sites as this might lead to irritation and soreness. Insulin needle guides Read product guides from Sue Marshall with user reviews for insulin needles and accessories. You can buy pens, needles and accessories from the Diabetes Shop. Use needles correctly Make sure that along with rotating injection sites, you follow these rules for using needles correctly. Use new needles either for every injection or at least change them once a day. Do not inject through clothing (or only very rarely). If you’re an ‘old hand’ at injecting, you might benefit from a quick refresher on how to inject to make sure you’re doing it correctly. Needles ranges fit on most insulin pens Most needle ranges fit on most insulin injection pens, including all Novo Nordisk and Eli Lilly pens (Novopens and Humapens) as well as the Autopen range from Owen Mumford. All of these needles are available on prescription. Gauges and needle length The measurements of needles relate to how long the needle is. When a needles measurement is 31G, the G (or g) refers to the gauge of the needle. This donates the thickness, size, or capacity. Th Continue reading >>

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

What Size Insulin Syringe Should I Buy?

Insulin syringes come in several sizes. When buying syringes, keep these things in mind: Needle gauge: The gauge of the needle means its width, or thickness. Insulin syringes range from 28 gauge to 31 gauge, and the larger the number the smaller the gauge. (An Ultra-Fine II brand needle is the smallest, and the Ultra-Fine is the next size up.) Smaller, thinner children may do well with the smaller gauge needle. Some older and larger children may prefer the larger needle. Needle length. Common needle lengths are 12.7 mm (1/2") and 8 mm (5/16"). The 8-mm needle is called "short" and is the length that most people prefer. Barrel size: The barrel size determines how much insulin the syringe can hold. Buy a barrel size that best matches your standard insulin dosage. For example, a 3/10-cc syringe is best for 30 units or less, 1/2-cc syringe is best for 30 to 50 units, and a 1-cc syringe is best for injections of 50 to 100 units. To make sure you have the size you need, always check the box before you leave the pharmacy. When you draw up insulin, look closely at the markings on the barrel, especially whenever you change syringe sizes. The markings will be different, and you need to make sure you're drawing up the right dose. Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

If you or someone you know has diabetes, you’re not alone. Millions of Americans are living with it. And of those, about 15% use medicine that’s injected. Vials and syringes used to be the most common way to inject. But today, many injectable diabetes medicines come in prescription pens, also called prefilled pens. Here, we will focus on the needles that are used with those pens. Choosing a pen needle Today's pen needles are designed to fit most prefilled pens. But, there are other things to consider when choosing a pen needle. Talk with your health care provider; together you can decide which needle works best for you. To learn more about Novo Nordisk’s line of needles and to find the pen needle that’s right for you, click here. Today’s needles are shorter and thinner People who have never self-injected may have concerns about doing so and that’s understandable. But pen needles have come a long way from the ones first launched in 1985. Since then, injection comfort has driven needle technology, making the needles used today shorter and thinner than the ones used in the past. Understanding needle size Pen needles come in all different sizes. The size of a needle is indicated by 2 factors—length and gauge (G): Needle length is measured in millimeters. Lengths range anywhere from 12.7 mm to 4 mm, the shortest insulin pen needle currently available Understanding gauge can be a little tricky. The gauge of a needle refers to its thickness. You would think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, a 32G needle is thinner than a 27G needle Always use a new needle for each injection You run the risk of infection from reusing needles. The more you reuse a needle, t Continue reading >>

Choosing The Best Pet Insulin Syringes

Choosing The Best Pet Insulin Syringes

Diabetes can be a difficult disease to manage in humans, and even more difficult in animals. Dogs and cats can both develop diabetes, and currently there is no cure for it. Often, it requires a treatment plan designed by a veterinarian that involves checking blood sugar and giving insulin shots. If you have to give your pet regular insulin shots you may already know the challenges involved, but having the right equipment to get the job done can make it easier. Or, if your pet has recently been diagnosed, you may be wondering what kind of syringes you need. Pet insulin syringes are made in a variety of types and sizes, so it can be tricky to know the difference. U-100 vs U-40 Pet Insulin Syringes Unlike other medications, insulin is measured in units. “Units” is short for international units (IU), which is a form of measurement used for describing volume. Insulin for animals usually comes in two different concentrations, 40 units/mL and 100 units/mL. Depending on the brand of insulin, the concentration may be written on the bottle as 100 units/mL, U-100, 100 IU or 40 units/mL, U-40, 40 IU. When selecting syringes to use with your pet’s insulin you want to make sure they match the concentration, otherwise your pet will receive the wrong dose. This is because the syringes have different dosage markings. For example: if you have Lantus 100 units/mL, you would use U-100 syringes, or Vetsulin 40 units/mL would use U-40 syringes. If you are unsure of the concentration of your pet’s insulin, talk to your veterinarian. Pet Insulin Syringes Needle Gauge & Length Insulin syringes have an attached needle, and the size of a needle is usually measured by gauge and length. The gauge number describes how thick a needle is, and the higher the number, the thinner the needle. For Continue reading >>

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

The Best Insulin Pen Needles The Long And The Short Of It

If you a diabetic, chances are that you have heard of insulin. When pancreas no longer makes enough insulin to control blood glucose, injecting of insulin is necessary. People with type one diabetes need insulin early. People with type two diabetes also require insulin if diet, exercise and oral medication do not bring blood glucose under control. Currently, the only way to get insulin into the body is by injecting it. Most people with diabetes not already using insulin dread the thought of injections. However, the benefits of bringing blood glucose under control make it worth overcoming this fear. The good news is that insulin injections today are quite painless. Technology has advanced. Needles are finer and shorter than ever before, but still deliver insulin effectively. Insulin delivery devices have come a long way since the days of the needle and syringe. Although syringes are still available, most people who inject insulin daily use a pen delivery device. Whether you choose an insulin syringe or pen, the cost is comparable. An insulin pen can be a pre-filled pen, or a re-useable pen that is reloaded with insulin cartridges. Each injection requires a new pen needle (or tip) to be attached to the pen before the injection. After the pen needle has delivered a dose of insulin, it must be safely discarded into an approved sharps container. Another method is to clip the needle off using a safe-clip device. Use each pen needle only once. Reusing a pen needle can cause various problems at the injection site. Problems include lipodystrophy (build-up of lumpy fat tissue), pain, bleeding, bruising, or even having a needle break off under the skin. Pen needles are coated with a lubricant for a smoother insertion into the skin. This lubricant will not be as effective in furthe Continue reading >>

Syringe Needle Size

Syringe Needle Size

Needle size refers to both the length and gauge (thickness) of the needle. Needle Length BD syringes are available with short needles (6mm or 8mm). BD Pen Needles are available in 1/8" (4mm), 5/16" (8mm) and 3/16" (5mm) lengths. The pain that insulin users may feel when they inject depends on their insulin dose, where they inject, the amount of fatty tissue under their skin, and other factors. Some insulin users prefer short needles because they find them to be more comfortable. However, some people find that the longer, original needle length is more comfortable for them. Needle Gauge (thickness) The word 'gauge' rhymes with 'cage' and tells how thick a needle is. Depending on the needle length you choose, you might also have a choice of gauge. The higher the gauge, the thinner the needle. For example, a 31 gauge needle is thinner than a 29 gauge needle. BD syringes are available in 31 gauge (BD Ultra-Fine™) and 30 gauge (BD Ultra-Fine™ II). BD pen needles are available in 32 gauge (BD Ultra-Fine™ Nano™ ) and 31 gauge (BD Ultra-Fine™ III). Choosing a Syringe Needle Gauge Some people prefer 30 or 31 gauge needles because they're thinner. If you'd like to try a 31 gauge syringe needle, talk to your doctor, because the use of a shorter needle may change your blood sugar control. Continue reading >>

Pen Needles

Pen Needles

Pen needles are used in conjunction with injection pens to deliver injectable medications into the body. A pen needle consists of a hollow needle which is embedded in a plastic hub and attaches to injection pens. Pen needles come in a variety of needle lengths and diameters and are used by health professionals and patients for injection of a variety of medications. They are commonly used by people with diabetes who often require multiple daily insulin injections. Needle technology has changed over the past decades. Many years ago home use syringe needles were large, and had to be sterilized and sharpened by hand by patients themselves. Today’s pen needles are engineered and manufactured for greater comfort and ease of use with electro-polishing for needle smoothness; thin, fine point tips for ease in penetration; lubrication for less friction and more glide; plastic caps for safety; and individual wrapping for sterility. Injection pen and pen needles are an alternative drug delivery method to the traditional vial/syringe method. Background[edit] Insulin and other injectable medications are commonly administered with drug delivery pens. Pens are one of the easiest and fastest-growing methods for administering insulin and other injectable medication. The medication either comes in a disposable pen or in a cartridge for use with a re-usable pen. The user generally attaches the pen needle, dials a dose of medicine, then injects the medicine under the skin. Highly popular for more than 20 years in Europe, use of injection pens and pen needles is rapidly spreading in the U.S. for diabetes care and other non-diabetes drugs. As technology and competition advance, driving the desire for more comfortable and more effective injections, the design of the pen needle and its parts Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

Does Insulin Syringe Needle Length Matter?

When it comes to diabetes therapy, insulin is pharmacists’ most valuable weapon. Although oral therapies can offer convenience and reduce hypoglycemia risk, the glucose-lowering effects of insulin remain unrivaled. Simply put, insulin is diabetic hormone replacement therapy. Patients with hypothyroidism receive levothyroxine, while patients no longer making sufficient insulin can replace it exogenously. Unfortunately, patients may resist starting insulin for many reasons, one of which is a fear of needles. Injecting insulin can be painful, especially when using longer needles. Painful injections are not only unpleasant for patients, but can also lead to medication noncompliance and poorer health outcomes. Although longer needles are often prescribed for patients with increased body fat, this practice actually has no clinical basis. Insulin is meant to be injected into subcutaneous tissue, human skin is only 1.6 mm to 2.4 mm thick, on average. Because skin thickness doesn’t increase significantly in overweight and obese patients, a 4-mm needle is sufficient to deliver insulin to subcutaneous tissue in patients of all sizes. Furthermore, choosing longer needles can negatively impact therapy in thinner patients. If patients inject insulin intramuscularly because their needle is too long, the drug’s absorption will be accelerated, while it’s duration of action will be shortened. Initiating insulin is often a significant lifestyle change for patients. Pharmacists can play a substantial role in helping patients overcome their fear of injection. For example, providing demonstrations and patient counseling about insulin—along with assuring patients that short-length, small-gauge needles can be used—can go a long way in promoting insulin acceptance and adherence. ◄ Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat Care

Diabetic Cat Care

Many human insulin types now come in pen form and this trend is becoming more popular when it comes to insulin for diabetic cats. The problem with using the pens is they only allow for half or full units of insulin to be dosed, where with TR we typically give insulin in much smaller, fractional increments. If your vet is planning to prescribe pen form insulin to you, we recommend you ask for a prescription for refill cartridges and syringes with half unit markings to match the insulin instead. If you've already got insulin in pen form, it is possible to use syringes to access the insulin inside. If after reviewing this sticky, you have any questions about which insulin syringes to use, please post on Talking TR for assistance. The top photo is a U40 syringe which come with red caps and needles covers, and are also available with red unit marks. U40 syringes are made to hold 20.0u of U40 insulin or less, and are difficult to find with half unit marks. Your vet will tell you U40 insulin must be used with U40 syringes however, it is possible to use U40 insulin with U100 syringes. The important thing is to get syringes with half unit markings. We recommend using the syringe in the bottom of the photo which is a 3/10cc (ml) 100 syringe, for use with 30.0 units or less of U100 insulin. They have orange caps and needle covers. U100 syringes come with both full and half unit marks. Syringes with half unit marks make measuring the small increments given on TR much easier and more accurate. If from Europe, the description is 3/10ml, for 30 units or less, demi (descriptor for half unit markings). The cc and ml unit of measurement is the same. U100 syringes can be utilized with U40 insulin by using the conversion chart. Half unit marks make for much easier measuring of half and qua Continue reading >>

Know Your Needles

Know Your Needles

Needle Tips Getting more comfortable with injecting. If you have concerns about using an injectable medicine for your diabetes, you’re not alone. Many people living with diabetes have a fear of injections. Learning more about needles may help you get over the hurdle of injecting. Why one needle might be a better fit than another. Needles come in all different sizes—there are a lot of options to choose from. Health care providers and pharmacists can help recommend the right needle for you. Here are some things you should know: Needle length Needles come in all different lengths. NovoFine® Plus is 4 mm in length, our shortest insulin pen needle currently available. Although its size may suggest otherwise, when compared with longer and thicker needles, a 4 mm needle effectively delivers insulin regardless of patient body mass index (BMI). However, everyone is different and there are several factors that are considered to determine the appropriate needle length for you. Talk to your doctor to find out which type of needle is best for you. Needle gauge You can tell a needle’s thickness by looking at its gauge (G). You might think the higher the number, the thicker the needle, but it’s actually the opposite. The higher the number, the thinner the needle is. For example, 32G needles, like those available with NovoFine® Plus, NovoFine®, and NovoTwist®, are thinner than a 27G needle. These needles are also designed with SuperFlow Technology™, which improves flow rates and helps to reduce injection force. NovoFine® Plus, NovoFine®, and NovoTwist® needles—some of the shortest and thinnest needles available from Novo Nordisk. Risks of reusing needles. Do not reuse or share your needles with other people. You may give other people a serious infection, or get a ser Continue reading >>

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

Choosing A Needle To Inject Insulin: What’s The Difference?

For a person with diabetes who is beginning insulin therapy, the range of products can be overwhelming. The options are often limited by the patient’s healthcare plan, however, and the initial selection of a product is frequently influenced by the healthcare provider. With diabetes education tailored to the individual patient, the delivery of insulin through a particular device is achieved by teaching proper injection technique and selecting an appropriate needle. Because people using insulin to manage their diabetes prefer a painless, easy-to-use, and affordable device, manufacturers have worked to improve the injection experience. Over the past 25 years, needle size has evolved from a 16-mm (length), 27-gauge (thickness) needle in 1985, to a 4-mm, 32-gauge needle in 2010. A shorter, thinner needle reduces pain and anxiety during insulin injection. But does this type of needle work as well as a bigger needle, especially in people with more body fat? One concern when using a thin, short needle is whether or not the tip of the needle actually gets through the skin to deliver the full dose of insulin into the fat layer. For a long time, skin thickness has been a factor in product selection. The tendency has been to choose a larger needle for larger patients, using the skin-pinch method of injection to prevent intramuscular administration and subsequent pain and variable glycemic control. Recently, a study was conducted using ultrasound to measure the skin thickness at four injection sites in 338 patients with diabetes. Patients ranged in age from 18 to 85 years, and their BMIs ranged from 19.4 to 64.5 kg/m2. Investigators found minimal variation in skin thickness according to age, gender, race, and body mass. Most patients had a skin thickness of less than 2.8 mm, with Continue reading >>

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