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What Is The Duration Of Regular Insulin?

Insulin Types

Insulin Types

Types of Insulin Insulin types are discussed in the table below. [1] Table 1. Insulin Types (Open Table in a new window) Insulin Type Onset Peak Duration Ultra short acting: insulin lispro, insulin aspart, insulin glulisine Usually taken before a meal to cover the blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin 12-30 min 0.5-3 hr 3-5 hr Short acting: regular insulin Usually taken about 30 minutes before a meal to cover blood glucose elevation from eating Used with longer-acting insulin 30 min 2.5-5 hr 4-24 hr Intermediate acting: insulin NPH Covers the blood glucose elevations when rapid-acting insulins stop working Often combined with rapid- or short-acting insulin and usually taken twice a day 1-2 hr 4-12 hr 14-24 hr Long acting: insulin glargine, ultralente insulin, insulin detemir Often combined, when needed, with rapid- or short-acting insulin Lowers blood glucose levels when rapid-acting insulins stop working Taken once or twice a day 3-4 hr No defined peak ≥24 hr Continue reading >>

Insulin Chart

Insulin Chart

List of insulin types available in the U.S. and how they work. By the dLife Editors Each type of insulin has its own unique behavior. One difference among types of insulin is how long they take to start working at lowering blood-glucose levels. The “insulin peak” is the point at which the dose is working at its maximum, and the “duration” is how long the blood-glucose-lowering effect of the injection will last. The following is a list of insulin types available in the United States, along with how soon they start working, their peak, and how long they last. Talk to your healthcare provider about your insulin regimen. Insulin Type Onset of Action Peak Duration of Action Lispro U-100 (Humalog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Lispro U-200 (Humalog 200) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Aspart (Novolog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Glulisine (Apidra) Approximately 20 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Regular U-100 (Novolin R, Humulin R) 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours 6-10 hours Humulin R Regular U-500 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours Up to 24 hours NPH (Novolin N, Humulin N, ReliOn) 2-4 hours 4-8 hours 10-18 hours Glargine U-100 (Lantus) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-100 (Basaglar) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-300 (Toujeo) 6 hours No significant peak 24-36 hours Detemir (Levemir) 1-2 hours Minimal** Up to 24 hours** Degludec U-100 & U-200 (Tresiba) 1-4 hours No significant peak About 42 hours Afrezza < 15 minutes Approx. 50 minutes 2-3 hours *Information derived from a combination of manufacturer’s prescribing information, online professional literature sources and clinical studies. Individual response to insulin preparations may vary. **Peak and length of action may depend on size of dose and length of time since ini Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Insulin Mnemonics For Peak, Onset, Duration & Types

Insulin Mnemonics For Peak, Onset, Duration & Types

Studying diabetes in nursing school and wondering how you are going to remember the onset, peak, and duration of certain types of insulin or the different types of insulins? Need an awesome insulin mnemonic? Well, look no further because here are some clever mnemonics to help you nursing students out there learn these mind-boggling numbers of onset, peak, and duration of insulin. First, let’s go over the different types of insulin and what insulin falls into each category. They are (remember them in order because the first one is the fastest and the last one is the longest): Rapid-acting (fastest) Short-acting Intermediate (medium acting) Long (longest) Remember the phrase to help you remember which ones are the fastest and longest: Ready (rapid), Set (short), Inject (intermediate), Love (long)! Now how do you remember if Novolog is short or rapid or if Levemir is long or short? Remember the word INSULIN and play off of the word. Watch the video below on how to set-up the word. Insulin Mnemonics I Insulin Onset, Peak, and Duration Times Rapid-Acting Insulin: Onset: 15 minutes Peak: 1 hour Duration: 3 “15 minutes feels like an hour during 3 rapid responses.” Short-Acting Insulin: Onset: 30 minutes Peak: 2 hours Duration: 8 hours “Short-staffed nurses went from 30 patient to (2) 8 patients.” Intermediate-Acting Insulin: Onset: 2 hours Peak: 8 hours Duration: 16 hours “Nurses Play Hero to (2) eight 16 year olds.” Long-Acting Insulin: Onset: 2 hours Peak: NONE Duration: 24 hours “The two long nursing shifts never peaked but lasted 24 hours.” More Diabetes NCLEX Review Videos Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

Insulin Administration

Insulin Administration

Insulin is necessary for normal carbohydrate, protein, and fat metabolism. People with type 1 diabetes mellitus do not produce enough of this hormone to sustain life and therefore depend on exogenous insulin for survival. In contrast, individuals with type 2 diabetes are not dependent on exogenous insulin for survival. However, over time, many of these individuals will show decreased insulin production, therefore requiring supplemental insulin for adequate blood glucose control, especially during times of stress or illness. An insulin regimen is often required in the treatment of gestational diabetes and diabetes associated with certain conditions or syndromes (e.g., pancreatic diseases, drug- or chemical-induced diabetes, endocrinopathies, insulin-receptor disorders, certain genetic syndromes). In all instances of insulin use, the insulin dosage must be individualized and balanced with medical nutrition therapy and exercise. This position statement addresses issues regarding the use of conventional insulin administration (i.e., via syringe or pen with needle and cartridge) in the self-care of the individual with diabetes. It does not address the use of insulin pumps. (See the American Diabetes Association’s position statement “Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion” for further discussion on this subject.) INSULIN Insulin is obtained from pork pancreas or is made chemically identical to human insulin by recombinant DNA technology or chemical modification of pork insulin. Insulin analogs have been developed by modifying the amino acid sequence of the insulin molecule. Insulin is available in rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting types that may be injected separately or mixed in the same syringe. Rapid-acting insulin analogs (insulin lispro and insulin a Continue reading >>

What Is Regular Insulin?: Onset, Peak Time, Duration And Side Effects

What Is Regular Insulin?: Onset, Peak Time, Duration And Side Effects

What is regular insulin? Regular insulin, with alternative names soluble insulin and neutral insulin, refers to a short acting insulin which is used with exercise and diet program to manage high blood sugar in diabetic patients. However, it can be taken in combination with other long acting or intermediate insulin. This medication can be used alone or with other diabetes medication like metformin. Insulin regular is used to treat diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2, in addition to gestational diabetes and other conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Insulin regular refers to man made insulin that works the same as the insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering the level of blood sugar in the body. If high blood sugar is not properly managed, it can lead to severe health conditions such as heart attack and stroke. For our bodies to properly utilize glucose found in carbohydrate rich foods, insulin is supposed to be present to facilitate the process of glucose absorption. Regular insulin works by helping glucose get into the cells so that our bodies can use to produce energy. This medication should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in children of any age. Also, you should not use this medication if you are allergic to insulin or experience low levels of blood sugar. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar usually happens in patients that are diabetic. Symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sweating Shakiness Fatigue or weakness Impaired vision Headache Hunger Loss of consciousness Irritability Difficulty in concentration If you experience these symptoms and you think they are life threatening, you need to inform your doctor immediately. It is advisable you keep sugar sources such as fruit juice, non diet soda or hard candy in case you experi Continue reading >>

The Different Types Of Insulin For Type 1 Diabetes

The Different Types Of Insulin For Type 1 Diabetes

Type 1 diabetes involves a deficiency of insulin production due to an autoimmune destruction of the insulin-producing cells of the pancreas, in other words the beta cells of the islets of Langerhans. As a result, these cells can't produce insulin in adequate amounts to maintain normal glucose homeostasis. This leads to hyperglycaemia (excess of glucose in the bloodstream) and weight loss, accompanied by ketoacidosis (acid build-up), during which the body breaks down fat into fatty acids and ketones. Type 1 diabetes usually begins in the teenage years, but may have an earlier or later onset, with the hallmark being the presence of diabetic ketoacidosis either at presentation or in the absence of insulin therapy. Type 1 diabetics require insulin therapy to maintain normal glucose and lipid metabolism. This is non-negotiable, and there are really no other alternatives in the management of this condition, which can be life-threatening. a. Human insulin vs. insulin analogues Insulin was previously harvested from animal pancreas, but this form of insulin included impurities, which lead to allergies in some people. Current insulin preparations are manufactured using recombinant DNA technology and can be broadly classified into two categories: Human insulin, which is identical to human insulin in structure. Human insulin analogues, in which one or two amino acids of human insulin are changed or substituted. Contrary to what one would expect, human insulin (Actrapid, Humulin N, Insuman, Humulin 30/70, Actraphane and Insuman 30/70) given subcutaneously (beneath the skin) doesn't act optimally. This is due to delayed or variable absorption, which leads to day-to-day variations in glucose. This led to the development of the human insulin analogues, which have a more consistent abso Continue reading >>

Insulin Therapy In Cats (proceedings)

Insulin Therapy In Cats (proceedings)

123Next Few diseases are as frustrating for a veterinarian as diabetes mellitus. Realistically, control of hyperglycemia is rarely accomplished, and clinical signs of diabetes often persist. The landscape is changing in feline diabetes, however, and as clinicians learn more about new insulin preparations, diets, and treatment monitoring strategies, cats with diabetes may be better controlled. Insulin Therapy There are many different types of insulin that vary with species of origin and with chemical modifications and formulations that affect onset and duration of action. Unfortunately, no feline insulin formulation is currently available, so human, bovine, or porcine insulin are used in treating diabetic cats. Data concerning the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of insulin in the cat are difficult to interpret. Most published studies have been conducted in normal cats, and some have been done in cats with diabetes. In either case, it is difficult to determine the effects of endogenous vs. exogenous insulin. Determinations of potency, time to peak activity and duration of activity, factors that influence choice of doses and dosing intervals, vary widely from cat to cat. In fact, there is no reasonable way to predict the kinetics of an given insulin preparation in any given patient. The most commonly used insulin preparations in cats are Regular insulin (Humulin-R™ ), NPH insulin (Humulin-N™ ), porcine lente insulins (Vetsulin™ ), PZI, Insulin glargine (Lantus™ ), and insulin detemir (Levemir™ ). Regular insulin is not used for chronic treatment of diabetes in cats, but is commonly used in the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. NPH, PZI, and Lente NPH is considered an intermediate-acting insulin, and is available as a human recombinant product. NPH is used Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Topic Overview Insulin is used to treat people who have diabetes. Each type of insulin acts over a specific amount of time. The amount of time can be affected by exercise, diet, illness, some medicines, stress, the dose, how you take it, or where you inject it. Insulin strength is usually U-100 (or 100 units of insulin in one millilitre of fluid). Short-acting (regular) insulin is also available in U-500. This is five times more concentrated than U-100 regular insulin. Long-acting insulin (glargine) is also available in U-300. This is three times more concentrated than U-100 long-acting insulin. Be sure to check the concentration of your insulin so you take the right amount. Insulin is made by different companies. Make sure you use the same type of insulin consistently. Types of insulinfootnote 1 Type Examples Appearance When it starts to work (onset) The time of greatest effect (peak) How long it lasts (duration) Rapid-acting Apidra (insulin glulisine) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-1.5 hours 3-5 hours Humalog (insulin lispro) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-2 hours 3.5-4.75 hours NovoRapid (insulin aspart) Clear 10-15 minutes 1-1.5 hours 3-5 hours Short-acting Humulin R, Novolin ge Toronto (insulin regular) Clear 30 minutes 2-3 hours 6.5 hours Intermediate-acting Humulin N, Novolin ge NPH(insulin NPH) Cloudy 1-3 hours 5-8 hours Up to 18 hours Long-acting Lantus (insulin glargine) Clear 1.5 hours Does not apply Up to 24 hours Levemir (insulin detemir) Clear 1.5 hours Does not apply 16 to 24 hours Toujeo (insulin glargine U-300) Clear Up to 6 hours Does not apply Up to 30 hours Rapid-acting insulins work over a narrow, more predictable range of time. Because they work quickly, they are used most often at the start of a meal. Rapid-acting insulin acts most like insulin that is produced by Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Insulin (and Other Injected Drugs)

Insulin (and Other Injected Drugs)

Diabetes is a disease affecting the body's production of insulin (type 1) or both the body's use and its production of insulin (type 2). Injectable insulin is a lifesaver for people who can no longer produce it on their own Continue reading >>

Nclex Study Pharmacology Insulin

Nclex Study Pharmacology Insulin

Sort Can intermediate acting insulin be mixed with regular or rapid acting insulin? Isophane suspension: NPH Humulin N Novolin N YES What is the technique for mixing intermediate insulin with rapid or regular insulin? Isophane suspension: NPH Humulin N Novolin N CLEAR TO CLOUDY Draw up clear (regular or rapid acting) then draw up cloudy (NPH) Continue reading >>

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