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What Is The Drug Lantus Used To Treat?

Lantus Overdose

Lantus Overdose

Tweet Save It is possible to overdose on Lantus (insulin glargine). However, the specific effects of an overdose will vary, depending on how much of the medication was taken, dietary or exercise changes, and whether Lantus was taken with any other substances. Some of the symptoms of an overdose include signs of low blood sugar, such as blurry vision, extreme hunger, and shakiness. Treatment will involve supportive care. Is It Possible to Take Too Much Lantus? As with any medication, it is possible to take too much Lantus. The specific effects of an overdose may vary, depending on a number of factors, including the Lantus dosage, dietary or exercise changes, and whether Lantus was taken with any other medications or substances. As with all insulins, an overdose with Lantus can cause life-threatening complications. Symptoms of an Overdose With Lantus A Lantus overdose can cause low blood sugar levels (hypoglycemia). Some of the early symptoms of low blood sugar can include: Extreme hunger Dizziness Shakiness Sweating Cold sweats Blurry vision. More severe symptoms can include: Changes in behavior, such as irritability Loss of coordination Difficulty speaking Confusion Loss of consciousness Coma You may find that you have your own unique set of low blood sugar symptoms. Any time you suspect that you have low blood sugar levels, make sure to take immediate action. Also, it is a good idea to let others around you know how to spot your particular signs of low blood sugar and how to react, as you may be too confused, due to low blood sugar, to recognize the signs and respond adequately. Our free DiscountRx savings card can help you and your family save money on your prescriptions. This card is accepted at all major chain pharmacies, nationwide. Enter your name and email addres Continue reading >>

Insulin Prices Skyrocket, Putting Many Diabetics In A Bind

Insulin Prices Skyrocket, Putting Many Diabetics In A Bind

Insulin, a life-saving medication used to treat diabetes, was discovered nearly 100 years ago, yet the price of the drug has now spiked by 700 percent in just two decades. In early November, U.S. Sen. Bernie Sanders, the Vermont independent, pointed out that certain insulins had risen from $21 a vial in 1996 to $255 a vial in 2016. Some have likened the insulin price boosts to the recent price hikes for EpiPen — the lifesaving medication needed when someone has a serious allergic reaction. Edith Prentiss, 64, of New York City, knows all too well what the rising cost of insulin means. She needs insulin to treat her diabetes and stay alive, yet living on a fixed income has forced her to make tough choices on which drug she can afford. "I have other medications I've been on for years, and as they became generic, they got cheaper. Insulin has never gotten any cheaper," she said. Others have taken notice of these increases too. In mid-November, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) issued a call for Congress to investigate insulin pricing and come up with solutions so that people with diabetes aren't facing financial hardship when purchasing the medication they need to stay alive. The ADA said that in many areas in Europe, insulin costs one-sixth of what it does in the United States. "Insulin is not a luxury," said Dr. Desmond Schatz, president of medicine and science for the ADA. "The current situation is unacceptable. We have to make sure there is access for everyone, and that's why we're calling on Congress to hold hearings to identify why there's been such a dramatic increase in insulin prices." Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone that's necessary for the body to use the sugars found in foods as fuel. People with Type 1 diabetes don't make enough insulin to surv Continue reading >>

Addition Of Insulin Glargine To Combination Therapy With Oral Anti-diabetic Drugs: A Promising Therapeutic Option For Type 2 Diabetes

Addition Of Insulin Glargine To Combination Therapy With Oral Anti-diabetic Drugs: A Promising Therapeutic Option For Type 2 Diabetes

This study compared the effects of adding insulin glargine treatment to metformin (Glucophage), glimepiride (Amaryl) or their combination in patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus. Hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) in type 2 diabetes mellitus arises from a combination of insufficient insulin production and insulin resistance (failure of the cells to respond to insulin). Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are often treated using oral anti-diabetic drugs. However, the use of these drugs does not always achieve effective glycemic (blood glucose) control. Glimepiride and metformin are examples of oral anti-diabetic drugs used to treat type 2 diabetes mellitus. Glimepiride increases insulin release from the pancreas while metformin increases the body's response to insulin. Insulin glargine (Lantus) is a manufactured type of insulin that replaces the insulin that is normally produced by the body. This study aimed to examine the administration of oral anti-diabetic drugs with insulin glargine in patients failing almost maximum doses of oral anti-diabetic drugs. This study included 99 patients with uncontrolled type 2 diabetes mellitus (blood sugar levels above recommended target ranges) who had failed to achieve glycemic control while taking almost maximal doses of oral anti-diabetic drugs for 4 weeks. After 4 weeks, 33 patients were randomly assigned to receive insulin glargine plus metformin, 34 to receive insulin glargine plus glimepiride while 32 patients received insulin glargine plus glimepiride plus metformin. Glycated hemoglobin or HbA1c (a test that measures an average blood glucose concentration over 2 to 3 months) and fasting blood glucose levels (glucose levels before meals) were used to indicate the efficacy of the treatments. After 24 weeks of t Continue reading >>

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Insulin Treatment (beyond The Basics)

Patient Education: Diabetes Mellitus Type 2: Insulin Treatment (beyond The Basics)

TYPE 2 DIABETES OVERVIEW Type 2 diabetes mellitus occurs when the pancreas (an organ in the abdomen) produces insufficient amounts of the hormone insulin and/or the body's tissues become resistant to normal or even high levels of insulin. This causes high blood glucose (sugar) levels, which can lead to a number of complications if untreated. People with type 2 diabetes require regular monitoring and ongoing treatment to maintain normal or near-normal blood sugar levels. Treatment includes lifestyle adjustments, self-care measures, and medications, which can minimize the risk of diabetes-related and cardiovascular complications (eg, heart attacks and strokes). Learning to manage diabetes is a process that continues over a lifetime. The diagnosis of diabetes can be overwhelming at the beginning; however, most people are able to lead normal lives, and many patients become experts in their own care. This topic review discusses the role of insulin in blood sugar control for patients with type 2 diabetes. Separate topic reviews about other aspects of type 2 diabetes are also available. (See "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Overview (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Self-monitoring of blood glucose in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Diabetes mellitus type 2: Alcohol, exercise, and medical care (Beyond the Basics)" and "Patient education: Preventing complications in diabetes mellitus (Beyond the Basics)".) IMPORTANCE OF BLOOD SUGAR CONTROL IN TYPE 2 DIABETES Keeping blood sugar levels in control is one way to decrease the risk of complications related to type 2 diabetes. The most common complication of type 2 diabetes is heart d Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Drugs Wont Faze Sanofi

New Diabetes Drugs Wont Faze Sanofi

NEW YORK (CNN/Money) Sanofi-Aventis' diabetes drug Lantus has flourished in the lucrative industry for insulin products, and according to analysts, it will continue to do so despite two competing drugs which have recently entered the market. Lantus, an injectable insulin analogue (a modified version of insulin) on the market since 2000, became a blockbuster last year, when its worldwide sales shot up 80 percent and topped $1 billion. Sales for Lantus, which takes up more than half the U.S. market share for long-acting insulin products, are projected to snowball over the next five years. "Lantus has been doing extremely well because it's the only once-a-day long-acting analogue," said Bernstein analyst Gbola Amusa. According to Amusa, the drug's once-a-day status makes it superior to its competitors. As a long-acting insulin analogue, a single injection of Lantus steadily releases insulin into the blood over 24 hours. Insulin is used to control the blood sugar levels in diabetics, who have difficulty producing insulin naturally. Lantus is used to treat type 2 diabetes, the most common form of the disease affecting more than 90 percent of the 18.2 million diabetics in America. Diabetes is a growing area for health care, with 1.3 Americans diagnosed every year. Bernstein projected that U.S. sales for Lantus, which totaled $615 million in 2004, would more than double by 2011, to $1.5 billion. Worldwide, Lantus sales are projected to reach $2.6 billion by 2010, according to Merrill Lynch. French drug maker Sanofi (up $0.16 to $41.04, Research) totaled $20 billion in 2004 sales. But Lantus faces competition from two newly-approved insulin products: Levemir and Byetta. Levemir, an injectable, long-acting insulin analogue from Danish drugmaker Novo Nordisk (Research), a $5.3 bi Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (lant-us) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Lantus against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Lantus is used for Lantus is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Lantus is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Lantus is a long-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a rapid-acting human insulin or oral diabetes medication in combination with Lantus. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Lantus has been prescribed for you. Before you use Lantus When you must not use Lantus Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Lantus after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen/cartridge/vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Lantus in children less than 6 years. Before you start to use Lantus Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foo Continue reading >>

Buy Lantus Insulin Medications For Diabetes Treatment

Buy Lantus Insulin Medications For Diabetes Treatment

* CanadianInsulin.com provides flat rate shipping to anywhere in the United States. Lantus Insulin The drug is available in the following formulations and doses: What is Lantus? People with diabetes either do not produce enough insulin, or their bodies are unable to properly use the insulin that they do produce. When your body does not make enough insulin, you may need an external source of it. Lantus is a brand name of insulin glargine, which is a long-acting insulin analog. Insulin analogs are man-made versions of the naturally occurring insulin. Lantus is a type of insulin called basal, or baseline insulin that is slowly released giving a long duration of action. This is contrasted to mealtime, or bolus, insulin which has a rapid onset and it typically used to control blood sugar levels during meals. The two types of insulin are commonly used together to provide all day control of blood sugar levels. What is the medication used for? Lantus is used for the treatment of adults with type 2 diabetes, and also adults and children aged six and older with type 1 diabetes for the control of high blood sugar. It supplies a steady release of insulin to help control your blood sugar levels overnight and between meals. Treatment with Lantus may also need the support of a faster acting mealtime insulin that helps reduce the effects of blood sugar spikes that occur durinf and after meals. It is usually taken in the evening or night time by people having type 1 diabetes, latent autoimmune diabetes of adults but rarely with those with type 2 diabetes. It is typically self-injected subcutaneeously (under the skin) once daily. Lantus is not to be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA). How does it work? Lantus works by controlling blood sugar levels in the body just like naturally Continue reading >>

The World’s Top Selling Diabetes Drugs

The World’s Top Selling Diabetes Drugs

Lantus (insulin glargine [rDNA origin] injection) – $6.98bn Accounting for 17.2% of Sanofi-Aventis Group’s aggregate net sales in 2015, Lantus continues to be the world’s top selling insulin brand despite a decline of 10.8% in sales compared to 2014 which was caused by higher discounts and slowdown of basal insulin market in the US. The decline in US sales was partially offset by the strong performance in emerging markets, which contributed to 17.3% increase in sales, driven primarily by China. Lantus (insulin glargine) is a long-acting recombinant human insulin analogue developed for the treatment of adult and paediatric Type 1 /Type 2 in diabetics that require basal insulin to control hyperglycaemia. The biosynthetic insulin, injected subcutaneously, mimics NPH human insulin and regulates the glucose metabolism in the body. Lantus was approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in April 2000. The European Commission (EC) granted marketing authorisation for Lantus, valid throughout the European Union (EU), in June the same year. Januvia (Sitagliptin 25mg, 50mg, 100mg tablets) – $3.86bn Januvia (sitagliptin), the major candidate in Merck’s diabetes portfolio, accounted for 64.3% of the company’s revenue from diabetes drugs in 2015. Sales in the US remained strong with the company registering an increase of 3% in sales year-over-year. The effect of unfavourable foreign exchange on the drug’s sales was offset by higher volumes and pricing in the US, as well as volume growth in emerging markets and Europe. Developed by Merck Sharp & Dohme (MSD), a subsidiary of Merck, Januvia is an anti-hyperglycaemic drug approved for the treatment of Type 2 diabetes mellitus. It regulates blood sugar by increasing the active glucagon-like peptide (GPL-1) and gluco Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Dose, Indications, Adverse Effects, Interactions... From Pdr.net

Hormone secreted by pancreatic beta-cells of the islets of Langerhans and essential for the metabolism and homeostasis of carbohydrate, fat, and protein. Insulin glargine is a once-daily basal insulin analog without pronounced peaks. BASAGLAR, Lantus, Lantus SoloStar, Toujeo SoloStar BASAGLAR/Lantus/Lantus SoloStar/Toujeo SoloStar Subcutaneous Inj Sol: 1mL, 100U, 300U For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus and type 2 diabetes mellitus. For the treatment of type 1 diabetes mellitus. Subcutaneous dosage (100 units/mL, i.e., Lantus, Basaglar) Initially, administer one-third of the total daily insulin requirements/dose subcutaneously once daily. Titrate dosage to achieve blood glucose control and A1C goals in conjunction with a short-acting insulin. Give the dose at the same time every day, at any time. Administration in the morning may avoid nocturnal hypoglycemia. When transferring from once daily NPH insulin, the dose is usually not changed. However, when transferring from twice-daily NPH insulin to insulin glargine, the total daily dose of NPH insulin (or other twice daily basal insulin) should be reduced by 20% and administered as single dose once daily. When transferring from once-daily Toujeo to once-daily Lantus or Basaglar, the recommended initial Lantus or Basaglar dose is 80% of the Toujeo dose that is being discontinued. Thereafter, the dosage of insulin glargine should be adjusted to response. Children and Adolescents 6 years and older Insulin requirements are highly variable and must be individualized based on patient-specific factors and type of insulin regimen. During partial remission phase, total combined daily insulin requirement is often less than 0.5 units/kg/day. Prepubertal children (outside the partial remission phase) usually require 0.7 to Continue reading >>

Report On New Patented Drugs – Lantus

Report On New Patented Drugs – Lantus

Under its transparency initiative, the PMPRB publishes the results of the reviews of new patented drugs by Board Staff, for purposes of applying the PMPRB's Price Guidelines, for all new active substances introduced after January 1, 2002. Brand Name: Lantus Generic Name: insulin glargine DIN: 02245689 100 units per mL (10 mL per vial) Patentee: Sanofi-Aventis Indication - as per product monograph: For once daily subcutaneous administration in the treatment of patients over 17 years of age with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes mellitus who require basal (long-acting) insulin for the control of hyperglycemia. Date of First Sale: November 28, 2004 ATC Class: A10AE04 Drugs used in Diabetes, Insulins and analogues, Insulins and analogues, long-acting, insulin glargine Application of the Guidelines Summary: The introductory price of Lantus was found to be within the PMPRB's Guidelines because the price in Canada did not exceed the median of the prices of the same drug product in those countries listed in the Patented Medicines Regulations (Regulations) in which it was sold. Scientific Review: Lantus is a new active substance and the PMPRB's Human Drug Advisory Panel (HDAP) recommended that Lantus be reviewed as a category 3 new medicine (provides moderate, little or no therapeutic advantage over comparable medicines). The HDAP identified Novolin GE NPH, Humulin N (insulin NPH), Novolin GE Lente, Humulin L (insulin lente), Novolin GE Ultralente, Humulin U (insulin ultralente), and continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) using Humalog (insulin lispro). All of these drug products are indicated and used in the treatment of diabetes. The PMPRB's Guidelines provide that the dosage recommended for comparison purposes will normally not be higher than the maximum of the usual recomme Continue reading >>

Lantus Vs. Levemir

Lantus Vs. Levemir

What is Lantus? What is Levemir? 3 How do Lantus and Levemir work? Lantus is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form called insulin glargine. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Lantus is used to for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and type 2. Levemir is a Brand name for a man-made hormone product form of insulin called insulin detemir. It works by lowering glucose levels in blood. It is a long-acting form of insulin, a slightly different from other insulin forms that are not man-made. Levemir is used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes in adults. Levemir can be also used to treat type 1for the treatment of diabetes type 1 in adults and children who are at least 2 years old. Lantus and Levemir do have many similarities but they are not the same thing. They are both man-made long-acting form of insulin and they are both used for the treatment of diabetes type 1 and 2, and they are intended for daily management. Studies showed no significant difference in the effectiveness and safety of Lantus and Levemir for the treamtnent of type 2 diabetes. They’re both absorbed slowly over a 24-hour period. Both products are basal insulin formulas, which mean that sugar levels in blood are lowered more slowly but they last much longer. They act as background insulin, with a slow feed that mimics the constant low insulin output produced by a healthy pancreas. They are not used to correct sugar spikes or to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. Ketoacidosis treatment requires short-acting insulin. However, there are some differences. Levemir is an insulin detemir solution, while Lantus is an insulin glargine solution. Insulin glargine -Lantus is made by recombinant DNA Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine In The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Glargine In The Treatment Of Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin Glargine in the Treatment of Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Birmingham, West Midlands, England, UK Correspondence: Anthony H Barnett, Birmingham Heartlands Hospital, Undergraduate Centre, Birmingham, B9 5SS, UK Tel + 44 121 424 3587 Fax + 44 121 424 0593 Email [email protected] Copyright 2006 Dove Medical Press Limited. All rights reserved This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Insulin glargine is an analogue of human insulin that is modified to provide a consistent level of plasma insulin over a long duration. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies show that a single injection of insulin glargine leads to a smooth 24-hour timeaction profile with no undesirable pronounced peaks of activity. In clinical trials, this profile has been associated with at least equivalent, if not better, glycemic control than other traditional basal insulins and a significantly lower rate of overall and nocturnal hypoglycemia. The convenience of a once-daily injection, a lack of need for resuspension (insulin glargine is a clear solution when injected), and lower rates of hypoglycemia should translate into improvements in patient treatment satisfaction. This review appraises the evidence for the view that insulin glargine represents an advance in basal insulin therapy for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients. Keywords: Insulin glargine, basal insulin therapy, diabetes, review While insulin remains the only antihyperglycemic therapy for type 1 diabetes, oral agents have been the mainstay of therapy for those with type 2 diabetes. Oral therapies are limited in their ability to maintain tight glycemic control in the long term ( UKPDS 1995a , 1995b ). There is increasing support for the earlier initiation of insulin Continue reading >>

Lantus

Lantus

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone made by the pancreas that helps our body use or store the glucose (sugar) it gets from food. For people with diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin to meet the body's requirements, or the body cannot properly use the insulin that is made. As a result, glucose cannot be used or stored properly and accumulates in the bloodstream. Insulin injected under the skin helps to lower blood glucose levels. There are many different types of insulin and they are absorbed at different rates and work for varying periods of time. Insulin glargine is an extended, long-acting insulin. It takes about 90 minutes to begin working after injection, and it stops working after about 24 hours. After injection, insulin glargine is released slowly and constantly into the bloodstream. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are being given this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop using this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to use this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? Vial Each mL of sterile solution contains 100 u Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Cost, Dosage, Prescribing Information And Side Effects

Brand Name: Lantus Generic Name: insulin Glargine (rDNA Origin) Injection (vials and SoloStar) Medication Class: Long-Acting Insulin Manufacturer: Sanofi Aventis US FDA Approval Date: April 20, 2000 What is Lantus and its mechanism of action? Lantus (Insulin Glargine) is a long-acting type of insulin used for treating diabetes. Lantus is a biologic drug made by using recombinant DNA (rDNA) technology. Insulin is a hormone produced and released by beta cells in the pancreas. Insulin is released to help the body regulate blood glucose. Insulin release is triggered by an increase in blood glucose from food consumption. Lantus is a basal insulin analogue and it is equivalent to human insulin but it has a slower onset, no pronounced peak, and longer duration of action. Like other types of insulin Lantus regulates the use of glucose by the body. It lowers blood glucose by stimulating glucose uptake by skeletal muscle and adipose tissue, and also reducing glucose production in the liver. Insulin enhances protein production and reduces the breakdown of protein into smaller protein molecules (polypeptides) and breakdown of fats to release fatty acids. What is Lantus used for treating? Lantus is used to lower blood glucose and improve diabetes control in adult and pediatric patients with type 1 diabetes mellitus and in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. How effective is Lantus? In multiple studies in adults and pediatric patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes the effect of Lantus given once daily at bedtime on reducing glycated hemoglobin (HbA1C) was measured and compared against NPH once daily and twice daily. In two of the clinical studies, adult patients with type 1 diabetes were given Lantus or NPH insulin for 28 weeks. Regular insulin was administered before each meal. B Continue reading >>

Basaglar® (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

Basaglar® (insulin Glargine Injection 100 Units/ml), A Long-acting Basal Insulin, Is Now Available In U.s.

INDIANAPOLIS and RIDGEFIELD, CT – Dec. 15, 2016 – Eli Lilly and Company (NYSE: LLY) and Boehringer Ingelheim Pharmaceuticals, Inc. announced today that BASAGLAR® (insulin glargine injection 100 units/mL) is available by prescription in the U.S. BASAGLAR is a follow-on insulin to Lantus®. It is a long-acting insulin with an amino acid sequence identical to Lantus, another U-100 insulin glargine. In December 2015, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved BASAGLAR as a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. BASAGLAR should not be used to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. BASAGLAR should not be used during episodes of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) or in people with an allergy to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. “Lilly and Boehringer Ingelheim are proud to bring another proven effective diabetes treatment choice to people who may need a long-acting insulin to help control their blood sugar,” said David Kendall, M.D., vice president, Global Medical Affairs, Lilly Diabetes. “We know that starting insulin can be a challenging experience for some people with type 2 diabetes. As part of our continuing commitment to the diabetes community, we are expanding our educational resources.” With resources designed to be simple, BASAGLAR goes beyond just insulin by offering helpful support for people beginning insulin. These bilingual resources include an app for smartphones and tablets to provide an interactive experience that helps patients relax and guides them through injection using their BASAGLAR KwikPen®, injection demo kits (available through HCPs), and access to educational videos. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle h Continue reading >>

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