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What Is The Average Cost Of An Insulin Pump?

Budgeting For Diabetes Health Costs

Budgeting For Diabetes Health Costs

Diabetes can be a costly condition to manage. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), the cost of diabetes in the United States is more than $245 billion a year, which includes direct medical costs and the cost of reduced productivity. For a person living with diabetes, medical expenses are about 2.3 times higher than those for the average person without diabetes. People with diabetes accrue about $7,900 in diabetes-related healthcare costs annually and about $5,800 because of other health problems. One bright spot, according to the ADA, is the Affordable Care Act, which President Obama signed into law in 2010 and which has helped people with diabetes keep their insurance coverage and has broadened healthcare options to help manage costs. Whether you get your coverage through private health insurance, Medicare, Medicaid, your employer, or the Affordable Care Act, it’s important to read the fine print on your policy so you understand all the costs, including deductibles, copays, and prescription costs. Breaking Down the Costs of Diabetes Researchers with the ADA crunched data from national surveys and health databases and determined that the bulk of diabetes costs occur in these categories: 43 percent for hospital inpatient care. 18 percent for prescription medications. 12 percent for anti-diabetic agents and supplies. 9 percent for physician office visits. 8 percent for residential care facilities. The data were published in the April 2013 issue of Diabetes Care. Shannon Knapp, RN, a diabetes educator at the Cleveland Clinic in Ohio, suggests looking at the following elements when calculating the cost of your diabetes care: Diabetes medications. These include oral medications, insulin, and other injectable medication for diabetes. "Some of the newer and Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Cost Of Insulin Pumps

Cost Of Insulin Pumps

Tweet Insulin pumps are costly items but may be possible to fund for some households. Those considering buying an insulin pump should consider not only the cost of the pump, including the monthly consumables, accessories and insurance but, importantly, how you will receive the required insulin pump centred care. Most people in the UK who have a pump have it funded by the NHS. If you have an insulin pump on the NHS, you may need to cover some of the costs which may include insurance, accessories and, in the case of some pumps, glucose sensors as well. Insulin pump costs The cost of insulin pumps is often between £2000 and £3000. NICE guidance in 2008 records the following costs of insulin pumps: Johnson & Johnson - Animas 2020 - £2600 Medtronic - Paradigm real-Time MMT-522 - £2750 Medtronic - Paradigm real-Time MMT-722 - £2750 Roche - Accu-Chek Spirit - £2375 Deltec Cozmo - £2750 Newer insulin pumps are now available but prices of most pumps have stayed within similar price boundaries. Where can I buy an insulin pump? In the UK, you will need to choose which insulin pump is right for you and then and contact the insulin pump manufacturer. If you do not meet the clinical criteria for having an insulin pump via the NHS and you wish to purchase an insulin pump, you will need to check whether your diabetes clinic is able to and happy to provide all the care you may need. Please note that you should not expect your NHS clinic to necessarily have the resources to cover the care for a patient with a pump bought privately, in which case you will need to arrange diabetes care with a private diabetologist that is qualified to care for people with insulin pumps. It’s important to arrange how you will receive care before you go ahead and purchase an insulin pump. If you are Continue reading >>

How Much Does Insulin Pump Cost

How Much Does Insulin Pump Cost

The food our stomach digests are changed into glucose. Glucose is a kind of sugar that travels inside our body into the bloodstream and cells. This glucose is allowed by the insulin which is produced by our pancreas to enter the body and give it energy. Without insulin, our body will not be able to get the glucose we need, our cells will starve and the glucose in our blood will increase. If our body has irregular dosages of insulin, we could be diagnosed with diabetes. People with diabetes, will need insulin shots and pumps. But how much does insulin pump cost? We’ll discuss this further as we learn more about diabetes and its treatment. Without The Insulin Pump If a person with diabetes does not have his insulin level regulated, aside from having their blood glucose rise, they will also experience the following: urination more than the usual, often thirsty, losing weight, always hungry and tired, has dry and itchy skin, have sores that slowly heal, has blurry eyesight, tingling sensation in feet and hands, and sexual dysfunction. Diabetes is a chronic disease, which means it does not go away, but if left uncontrolled, it could progress and could lead to much damage in the body like, loosing eyesight and legs having to be amputated and other grave complications. Good thing, diabetes can be controlled and people who are affected by it are still able to live life to the fullest as they take their insulin, through the pump, but many are not yet familiar regarding the cost of diabetic pump. Getting An Insulin Pump In order to get an insulin pump, you will have to get a doctor’s prescription first. However, according to the Diabetes Self-Management website, not many doctors are familiar with insulin pump, and that out of the 25,000 doctors in the United States, only 2,00 Continue reading >>

What Is The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy?

What Is The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy?

WITH ELIGIBLE HOSPITAL INSURANCE YOU COULD GET COVERAGE FOR AN INSULIN PUMP If you’re living in Australia - the cost of the insulin pump is generally fully covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover (assuming the appropriate waiting period has been served). In choosing the health fund that’s best for you, it doesn’t necessarily have to be the most expensive level of cover. If in doubt, check with your private health insurer for what is covered. If you or a family member has Insulin Dependent diabetes, you may be interested in the options available to manage the cost of insulin pump therapy: Do you have more questions on private health insurance? Read the FAQ on private health insurance Learn more about the Bridging the Gap Program , T2 Grants Program and Continuous Glucose Monitoring (CGM) Deals Discover whether you are eligible for funding from the CGM Initiative Above costs are unique to insulin pump therapy vs multiple daily injections. Does not include additional costs related insulin, glucagon, test strips, wipes, and lancing devices. 1 Based on a Medtronic survey of the average cost of $3.28 per day for hospital policies with coverage for insulin pumps. Price of hospital policy is based on singles cover in NSW for a person under 65 years old, assumes no Lifetime Health Cover Loading and Base Tier Government Rebate included. The cost of the pump is generally covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover. 2 Your credit card will be charged in two instalments. Make the first $375 payment on credit card, then six weeks after Guardian™ 2 Link and initial sensor box is shipped, the second $375 payment will be deducted and second box shipped. The CGM Protector Kit and associated products can only be Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

Tweet There is a high level of demand for insulin pumps but currently the UK lags behind other European countries in its provision of insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow greater opportunity to take control of diabetes but, because they are a more expensive option than injections, eligibility criteria exists to ensure the most suitable candidates have access to insulin pump therapy. Funding options There are two main options for getting an insulin pump: Self funding –whereby you buy the pump and consumables NHS funded –the pump is paid for by the NHS for those meeting eligibility criteria The most common option for getting an insulin pump in the UK is to have one funded by the NHS. Getting an insulin pump privately If you buy the pump privately, you will need to consider the total cost, including the consumables, and ensure you have a health team with a specialism in insulin pumps. You will need to arrange whether you will be able to receive care on the NHS or privately before going ahead with buying an insulin pump privately. Insulin pumps tend to cost between £2,000 and £3,000 and the consumables for an insulin pump, including infusion sets, reservoirs and batteries, can cost around £1,000 to £2,000 a year. The NHS does not operate a scheme in which it funds pumps which have been bought privately. Getting a pump on the NHS The process of getting an insulin pump can vary across different parts of the UK as budgets, the level of demand for pumps and the number of healthcare professionals with experience of insulin pumps can all play a part. The advantage of applying for an insulin pump through the NHS is that you have the chance of getting the pump for free. This for most people outweighs the disadvantages of not knowing whether or when they may qualify for a pump Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Financial Concerns About Insulin Pumps

Many concerns arise when patients consider the costs of insulin pump therapy. The following are a few of the most frequently asked questions: What is the cost of a pump? About $6,000 is the average price. How much of the cost will my insurance cover? Most insurance plans provide coverage for insulin pump therapy and diabetes testing supplies under a Durable Medical Equipment (DME) clause. Pump manufacturers’ insurance departments have the expertise to negotiate approval for payment with your insurance provider. If you have a co-payment, the manufacturer will set up a payment plan, if necessary. Medicare and Medicaid plans also provide coverage, but you should check with the plan administrator in your state. What is the cost of supplies? Monthly costs for intensive insulin pump management supplies can range from $250 to $500, depending on your insurance plan and on the frequency of site changes. Here are potential costs for 10 set changes per month (every three days): Needle set Approximately $6.90 per set $69 90-degree insertion cannula Depending on the brand, $10.83 per set or $13.50 per set $108.30 $135 30-degree insertion cannula $11 per set $110 Pump syringes $10 per month $37-$46 Sterile dressings and skin prep $10 per month Example: box of 50 IV prep wipes Some vendor cash prices can be 30%-50% less than billed list price. Ask about payment options and discounts. $32 (billed) $16 (cash) Insulin Depends on coverage/co-pay/amount used. Variable Test strips Minimum of four daily multiplied by cost per strip. Approximately .75 to $1.00 per strip. Usually covered by insurance. $3-$10 per day Prices shown are estimates only. Vendor and manufacturer prices vary and can change at any time. How can we save money on supplies? If you use sites and supplies beyond the recom Continue reading >>

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes

Comparative Effectiveness And Costs Of Insulin Pump Therapy For Diabetes

Ronald T. Ackermann, MD, MPH; Amisha Wallia, MD, MS; Raymond Kang, MA; Andrew Cooper, MPH; Theodore A. Prospect, FSA, MAAA; Lewis G. Sandy, MD, MBA; and Deneen Vojta, MD Evaluation of healthcare utilization and costs over 3 years for adults with insulin-requiring diabetes who transition from multiple daily insulin injections to insulin infusion pumps. ABSTRACT Objectives: Continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), or “insulin pump” therapy, is an alternative to multiple daily insulin injections (MDII) for management of diabetes. This study evaluates patterns of healthcare utilization, costs, and blood glucose control for patients with diabetes who initiate CSII. Study Design: Pre-post with propensity-matched comparison design involving commercially insured US adults (aged 18-64 years) with insulin-requiring diabetes who transitioned from MDII to CSII between July 1, 2009, and June 30, 2012 (“CSII initiators”; n = 2539), or who continued using MDI (n = 2539). Methods: Medical claims and laboratory results files obtained from a large US-wide health payer were used to construct direct medical expenditures, hospital use, healthcare encounters for hypoglycemia, and mean concentration of glycated hemoglobin (A1C). We fit difference-in-differences regression models to compare healthcare expenditures for 3 years following the switch to CSII. Stratified analyses were performed for prespecified patient subgroups. Results: Over 3 years, mean per-person total healthcare expenditures were $1714 (95% confidence interval [CI], $1184-$2244) higher per quarter for CSII initiators compared with matched MDII patients (total mean 3-year difference of $20,565). Compared with matched controls, mean A1C concentrations became lower for CSII initiators by 0.46% in year 2 (P = .000 Continue reading >>

How Much Does An Insulin Pump Cost?

How Much Does An Insulin Pump Cost?

The cost of an insulin pump ranges from $4000-$10,000. The cost varies depending on the type and brand of pump. It also varies depending on where it is purchased from. There are three different types of insulin pumps – with tube, tubeless and implanted. The average cost of an insulin pump with a tube is around $4000-$5000. The average tubeless pump costs around $6000-$7000. The average cost of an insulin pump that is implanted is around $10,000. On top of the original expense of the pump, patients will spend about $100 a month on insulin and other supplies for with tube and tubeless insulin pumps. Implanted insulin pumps cost more for monthly insulin supplies than with tube or tubeless insulin pumps. Implanted insulin pumps cost around $120 a month for insulin and supplies. Most insurance plans will cover at least some of the cost of an insulin pump; the average insurance plan covers about 50% of the cost. However, most insurance plans will only allow patients to get the least expensive type, the with tube variety. Insulin Pump Cost Comparison Insulin pumps are expensive and no matter the style or brand will cost at least several thousand dollars. With tube insulin pumps cost less than tubeless or implanted pumps. With tube insulin pumps cost around $4000-$5000 each, while tubeless pumps cost around $6000-$7000 each. Patients can save $2000-$3000 on the cost of an insulin pump if they buy the with tube variety instead of the tubeless variety. Omnipod is one of the most popular brands of tubeless insulin pumps; Omnipod tubeless insulin pumps cost around $7000. Animas and Medtronic are two of the most commonly used brands of with tube pumps; they cost around $4000-$5000 each. Implanted insulin pumps cost more than with tube or tubeless pumps. They cost around $10,000 ea Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy

The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy

With eligible hospital insurance you could get coverage for an insulin pump The cost of If you’re living in Australia - the cost of an insulin pump is generally fully covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover (assuming the appropriate waiting period has been served). In choosing the health fund that’s best for you, it doesn’t necessarily have to be the most expensive level of cover. If in doubt, check with your private health insurer for what is covered. For the price of a coffee per day, you could get coverage for an insulin pump1 Are you in the interim waiting period for private health cover? NOW YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A LOAN PUMP FOR PEOPLE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A T2 GRANT, OFFERING UP TO 90% OFF RRP5 FOR INSULIN PUMP CONSUMABLES. More Details More Details More Details Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy In Alberta

Insulin Pump Therapy In Alberta

Insulin pump therapy (IPT) is a diabetes management method that uses a pump to administer insulin rather than by multiple daily injections. An insulin pump is a small, battery-powered computer that is about the size of a pager. The pump is programmed to give small continuous amounts of insulin from the reservoir through the cannula under the skin. The pump is not an artificial pancreas, blood glucose levels still need to be monitored, and the user must program the pump to provide the appropriate amount of fast-acting insulin. This method most closely matches the body’s normal release of insulin. In Canada insulin pumps cost between $6000-$8000 not including the cost of associated supplies. To learn more about insulin pump therapy and it’s benefits for your patients a local representative of the insulin pump companies can come to you. Their contact information can be found below. Alberta Insulin Pump Therapy Program As of May 2013, the Alberta Government provides funding to help with the cost of insulin pumps and supplies for Albertans with Type 1 Diabetes who meet their set of eligibility requirements. People with Type 2 Diabetes may also require IPT but the associated costs are not covered through this program, and must be met by the patient and their employer-sponsored or private insurance. The program funds the full cost of the insulin pump as well as all supplies required minus any amounts covered through government-sponsored agencies and patients’ employer-sponsored or private insurance programs. Eligibility criteria for the IPT program include The patient must be a resident of Alberta who is eligible for coverage under the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan. The patient must have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and be under the care of a physician or nur Continue reading >>

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

The Cost Of Having A Child With Diabetes

We all know the ultimate cost that living with Diabetes places on the PWD and their families. The mental burden of living with diabetes and caring for someone that lives with Diabetes can become overwhelming as it is. While previously we discussed about the increasing prices of insulin and its rise to an all-time highs, it is only a small piece of the puzzle, a small glimpse of the bigger picture of what it truly costs for someone with diabetes to stay ALIVE each and every month. We are not talking about just managing, or being healthy, but staying ALIVE. Let that word sink in for a moment with you. Yes, there are medications one takes to feel better, ibuprofen for a headache, or Tylenol for aches and pains, however, insulin and other diabetes related supplies are the few things that stand between someone with diabetes and death. Am I being over dramatic? Not really when you think about it, insulin is not a cure; it is not a medication you can miss for a day and still be okay the next day. While you may not necessarily DIE from one missed day of a dose of insulin, I can tell you that you will not feel good at all and may actually end up in the hospital. As you may be aware, I have two children who have type 1 diabetes, so I know a little bit about the costs of living with it, even though I do not live with the disease myself. I wanted to put together something that showed those with and especially those without diabetes how much it truly costs for people with this chronic illness to LIVE. The Burden of Diabetes The one thing that has always bugged me about this disease other than the most common reasons is the financial cost it takes to keep someone with Diabetes alive! Thankfully, we have insurance that covers for the majority of the cost, but I know there are people o Continue reading >>

Cost Of Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In The United States Among Patients On An Insulin Regimen For Diabetes.

Cost Of Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In The United States Among Patients On An Insulin Regimen For Diabetes.

Abstract BACKGROUND: People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing numerous complications, resulting in increased health care expenditures, economic burden, and higher mortality. For patients using an insulin pump or multiple insulin injections, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recognized as a core component of effective diabetes self-management. However, little is known about the real-world frequency and true costs associated with SMBG as a percentage of an insulin regimen in the United States. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate SMBG frequency, SMBG-related costs (including blood glucose test strips and testing supplies), and insulin therapy costs among insulin-dependent patients with diabetes and at least 1 pharmacy claim for blood glucose testing strips during a 12-month follow-up period. METHODS: A retrospective database analysis was conducted using the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims database to capture the frequency and costs associated with SMBG in relation to a specific insulin regimen, and SMBG expenditure compared with other treatment costs. The study employed a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with 2 or more claims for insulin between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009, with the first such claim representing the index date. All patients were required to have 6 months of pre-index continuous enrollment (pre-index period) and 12 months of post-index continuous enrollment (follow-up period). Patients were also required to have a diagnosis of diabetes in the pre-index period and to have no gaps of more than 90 days between consecutive insulin claims during the 360-day follow-up period. Patients without at least 1 pharmacy claim for blood glucose testing strips during the 12-month follow-up period and patients with pharmacy claims with extreme Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy In Australia

Insulin Pump Therapy In Australia

The Case for Action Insulin pump therapy can be life-changing and together with new technologies such as continuous glucose monitors, potentially life-saving for people with type 1 diabetes. Insulin pump therapy can reduce the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia1 (low blood sugar), enable better blood glucose management to reduce risk of complications, and reduce costs associated with ambulance use, emergency department presentations and hospital admissions. Insulin pump therapy can reduce fear of hypoglycaemia1, diabetes-related distress and depressive symptoms and can improve health status and quality of life. Australia has one of the highest rates of type 1 diabetes in the world. In the past year alone over 3021 new cases of type 1 diabetes were registered (8 new cases every day). There are over 25,000 young people with type 1 diabetes under age 30 and there are 118,000 Australians with type 1 diabetes. Due to cost and poor access only 14,990 (12%) Australians with type 1 diabetes have accessed insulin pump therapy, comparing poorly to the USA which has twice the level of access, estimated at 25%. Australia has an unfair funding model for insulin pumps with around 80% of all pumps in Australia provided to people with private health insurance. Australians without private insurance do not have affordable access to insulin pumps. The Insulin Pump Program introduced by the Australian Government in 2008 to improve access has to date only provided 611 pumps and has not been available to high-needs groups including young adults over age 18 years. High and/or urgent clinical needs, people over 18 years, and women planning for and during pregnancy should be eligible for access to the Insulin Pump Program. Currently, some people with type 1 diabetes with a clear clinical need ar Continue reading >>

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