diabetestalk.net

What Is The Average Cost Of An Insulin Pump?

The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy

The Cost Of Insulin Pump Therapy

With eligible hospital insurance you could get coverage for an insulin pump The cost of If you’re living in Australia - the cost of an insulin pump is generally fully covered by your insurance provider depending on your level of hospital cover (assuming the appropriate waiting period has been served). In choosing the health fund that’s best for you, it doesn’t necessarily have to be the most expensive level of cover. If in doubt, check with your private health insurer for what is covered. For the price of a coffee per day, you could get coverage for an insulin pump1 Are you in the interim waiting period for private health cover? NOW YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A LOAN PUMP FOR PEOPLE UNDER 18 YEARS OF AGE YOU MAY BE ELIGIBLE FOR A T2 GRANT, OFFERING UP TO 90% OFF RRP5 FOR INSULIN PUMP CONSUMABLES. More Details More Details More Details Continue reading >>

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

How Much Do Diabetes Supplies/medications Cost In The U.s.?

While everyone’s diabetes treatment plan, medications, and technology may be different, there is one thing we can all agree on: diabetes is expensive. In two previous posts at The Perfect D, I gave some sense of what the bare minimum of care for a U.S. adult with Type 1 diabetes would be and also financial resources and programs to help with the financial burden of living with diabetes. However, this post is about how much it could cost an adult with Type 1 diabetes if they used the technology and medications that are currently out on the market (and thought of as “the latest and greatest”) and paid out of pocket with no insurance. Research on this topic has shown me that: 1) prices can fluctuate wildly, so it pays to shop around and 2) there is a very big gap (financially, medically, and technologically) between the bare minimum and “surviving” and actually utilizing the tools and latest technology that is out there. So, the hypothetical person for this exercise is a Type 1 adult in the United States who weighs 60kg, just like the other calculation post I did. Ground Rules These prices are accurate on the websites I have referenced for December 1, 2014. They may change, they may add shipping, they may not offer the services, technology, or drugs on their website after this is posted. These prices are not a guarantee. They are to be used as a reference. The listing of prices/websites on this post does not mean that I endorse the company or product or service. I have not listed all the products available on the market for people with Type 1 diabetes. I have listed major ones to give you an idea of major manufacturers’ costs for the products that are available for general public viewing. I did not call any companies and ask for pricing. Why? Because I believe Continue reading >>

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

Diabetics Can Spend $1,000 A Month Taking Care Of Themselves — And It's Not Just Because Of Insulin

A paramedic checking the blood sugar levels of a diabetes patient. Beawiharta Beawiharta/Reuters Diabetes, in particular type 1 diabetes, can be an expensive chronic disease to manage. That's being felt as the cost of insulin increases, while at the same time high health insurance deductibles leave families on the hook to cover more of the cost than ever before. It means, in some cases, all the expenses can climb past $1,000 a month. There are two types of diabetes of which nearly 29.1 million Americans have one or the other. Type 1 is an autoimmune disease, in which the body mistakenly kills so-called beta cells that are supposed to make the body's insulin, a hormone that helps people absorb and process the sugar in food. This kind of diabetes can affect any age group, though it's most often diagnosed in children, teens, and young adults. The roughly 1.25 million people in the US who have Type 1 diabetes need to inject insulin to live. Type 2 diabetes, the more common form, is something that develops either based on genetic or lifestyle choices, and doesn't always require that you need to take insulin. But insulin isn't the only thing type 1 diabetics have to keep track of. There are a lot of supplies that come with the diagnosis: there are test strips, which help monitor blood sugar levels there are lancets that are used to draw the blood, not to mention alcohol swabs to clean the area where injections happen. There are also the needles/syringes you need to inject the insulin. There's also a device called glucagon, an emergency drug for diabetics that is kind of like the EpiPen. If a diabetic' blood sugar gets too low and he or she passes out, someone can administer the glucagon to get their blood sugar levels back up to non-emergency levels. Some also choose to use a Continue reading >>

The Minimed 670g Automatic Glucose Monitor And Insulin Pump For Diabetes

The Minimed 670g Automatic Glucose Monitor And Insulin Pump For Diabetes

Brand name: Minimed 670G System Device Generic Name: Automated Insulin Delivery System Device class: Insulin Pump Manufacturer: Medtronic FDA Approval date: September 28, 2016 On September 28th, 2016, the US Food and Drug Administration approved MiniMed 670G by Medtronic. It is the first FDA-approved device that automatically monitors glucose levels while providing an appropriate basal insulin dose in type 1 diabetics older than 14 years. What is the MiniMed 670G used to treat? MiniMed 670G is a hybrid closed looped system approved by the FDA to treat type 1 diabetes patients ages 14 years or older who require greater than 8 units of basal insulin per day. What is Minimed 670G and how does it work? MiniMed 670G has an integrated SmartGuard technology with an advanced algorithm to simplify and improve diabetes management. It enables greater glucose control with reduced user input. The system includes: the glucose sensor and continuous glucose monitor (CGM) that measures the user’s glucose levels for up to seven days, an insulin pump that delivers insulin, and a glucose meter used for calibration The glucose sensor is inserted under the skin of the abdomen and it measures glucose values in the tissue fluid. The sensor measures blood glucose levels every 5 minutes (interval depends on settings) and the insulin pump automatically administers or withholds basal insulin depending on blood glucose levels and user selected insulin dosing rates. If the glucose level is higher than the preset normal range, then insulin will be delivered following the algorithm. If the glucose level is lower than the preset normal range, the device will withhold insulin administration. Although the device works automatically, the user can also` administer insulin manually to adjust for meals. Th Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps Different People, Different Needs... Get The Pump Best For You

Insulin Pumps Different People, Different Needs... Get The Pump Best For You

You many be looking for greater flexibility in managing your diabetes. Consider the following scenarios. In each switching to insulin pump therapy could have an advantage. Mary is a 25-year-old elementary school teacher. She runs and swims to keep in shape. She has had type 1 diabetes for 20 years and injects insulin six times a day. Adam is an active three-year-old with type 1 diabetes. His parents are frustrated with his unpredictable appetite and eating habits. John is a 56-year-old carpet installer, with type 2 diabetes. His workload and schedule vary from day to day. On weekends, he is less active. He takes insulin four times a day. An insulin pump is a small, battery-powered microcomputer. It looks like a pager and is usually worn in a pocket, or clipped to a belt or waistband. The pump holds a syringe filled with rapid-acting insulin (Humalog™ or NovoRapid™). The syringe is attached to an infusion set, which is a thin plastic tubing with a small needle at the end. The needle is inserted into the fatty tissue below the skin, and then removed. This leaves a tiny, flexible plastic tube in place which must be changed every two to three days. The pump is programmed to deliver insulin continuously through this tube. A small dressing holds the infusion set in place. If you have discussed the option of an insulin pump with your diabetes specialist, you may be starting the search for the right pump. You, too, may be looking for greater flexibility in managing your diabetes. If so, you are likely asking yourself some questions. Which of the four pumps available in Canada should you buy? Which pump has the features you need and want? Do your research. An insulin pump is a major investment that you will use constantly for the next few years. Think about similarities and Continue reading >>

Getting An Insulin Pump

Getting An Insulin Pump

Tweet There is a high level of demand for insulin pumps but currently the UK lags behind other European countries in its provision of insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow greater opportunity to take control of diabetes but, because they are a more expensive option than injections, eligibility criteria exists to ensure the most suitable candidates have access to insulin pump therapy. Funding options There are two main options for getting an insulin pump: Self funding –whereby you buy the pump and consumables NHS funded –the pump is paid for by the NHS for those meeting eligibility criteria The most common option for getting an insulin pump in the UK is to have one funded by the NHS. Getting an insulin pump privately If you buy the pump privately, you will need to consider the total cost, including the consumables, and ensure you have a health team with a specialism in insulin pumps. You will need to arrange whether you will be able to receive care on the NHS or privately before going ahead with buying an insulin pump privately. Insulin pumps tend to cost between £2,000 and £3,000 and the consumables for an insulin pump, including infusion sets, reservoirs and batteries, can cost around £1,000 to £2,000 a year. The NHS does not operate a scheme in which it funds pumps which have been bought privately. Getting a pump on the NHS The process of getting an insulin pump can vary across different parts of the UK as budgets, the level of demand for pumps and the number of healthcare professionals with experience of insulin pumps can all play a part. The advantage of applying for an insulin pump through the NHS is that you have the chance of getting the pump for free. This for most people outweighs the disadvantages of not knowing whether or when they may qualify for a pump Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Not Just for Type 1 An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps today, and about 30,000 of those are believed to have Type 2 diabetes. Surprised? Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that causes many people who have it to eventually need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Although many people still think insulin pumps are only for treatment of Type 1 diabetes, they can also be useful for some people with Type 2 diabetes. According to Charles H. Raine III, MD, a diabetologist in Orangeburg, South Carolina, who himself has Type 2 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, the criteria for a good pump candidate are the same, no matter what type of diabetes a person has. In general, a good pump candidate has uncontrolled blood glucose, but also has a desire to try for better control of his diabetes, is willing to measure and document food intake and blood glucose levels, and is physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to manage a pump (or has a caregiver who is). Another important characteristic is a willingness to keep appointments with members of his diabetes care team. Insulin pumps are cell-phone-size devices used to deliver preprogrammed and user-adjusted doses of insulin. Depending on the brand and model, they hold between 180 and 315 units of insulin. Most people use rapid-acting insulin — options include insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), insulin aspart (NovoLog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) — in their pumps, with a few using Regular. Instead of using an intermediate- or long-acting insulin as a background — or basal — insulin, a user simulates the pancreas’s steady release of insulin by programming the pump to automatically give small amounts of the rapid-acting or Regular insulin around the clock, based on Continue reading >>

Cost Of Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In The United States Among Patients On An Insulin Regimen For Diabetes.

Cost Of Self-monitoring Of Blood Glucose In The United States Among Patients On An Insulin Regimen For Diabetes.

Abstract BACKGROUND: People with diabetes are at an increased risk of developing numerous complications, resulting in increased health care expenditures, economic burden, and higher mortality. For patients using an insulin pump or multiple insulin injections, self-monitoring of blood glucose (SMBG) is recognized as a core component of effective diabetes self-management. However, little is known about the real-world frequency and true costs associated with SMBG as a percentage of an insulin regimen in the United States. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate SMBG frequency, SMBG-related costs (including blood glucose test strips and testing supplies), and insulin therapy costs among insulin-dependent patients with diabetes and at least 1 pharmacy claim for blood glucose testing strips during a 12-month follow-up period. METHODS: A retrospective database analysis was conducted using the IMS LifeLink Health Plan Claims database to capture the frequency and costs associated with SMBG in relation to a specific insulin regimen, and SMBG expenditure compared with other treatment costs. The study employed a retrospective cohort analysis of patients with 2 or more claims for insulin between January 1, 2007, and June 30, 2009, with the first such claim representing the index date. All patients were required to have 6 months of pre-index continuous enrollment (pre-index period) and 12 months of post-index continuous enrollment (follow-up period). Patients were also required to have a diagnosis of diabetes in the pre-index period and to have no gaps of more than 90 days between consecutive insulin claims during the 360-day follow-up period. Patients without at least 1 pharmacy claim for blood glucose testing strips during the 12-month follow-up period and patients with pharmacy claims with extreme Continue reading >>

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Amrita Insulin Pump And Low-cost, Automated Biomedical Devices

Diabetes is a chronic disorder characterized by abnormal blood glucose levels due to problems associated with insulin production and action. When glucose levels rise too high, diabetes becomes dangerous. Without medical care, it can increase the risk of heart disease and stroke and in late stages can cause blindness, kidney failure and loss of limbs. Worldwide, 285 million people are afflicted, but it is worse in developing countries where less than half the cases go undiagnosed. A staggering 50.8 million affected people live in India. The World Health Organization (WHO) projects that by the year 2030 there will be about 75 million Indians who are diabetic, giving India the dubious distinction of becoming the diabetic capital of the world. Responding to India’s high incidence of diabetes, researchers at Amrita have designed an automated insulin pump, which was recently awarded a patent by the USPTO Patent No: US8,034,019 B2. When the prototype is commercialized, it will be the first of its kind developed in India and one of about half a dozen available worldwide. Normally, insulin pumps are expensive and cost about $4500, making it unaffordable for the average Indian diabetic patient. Considering this, Amrita worked to develop a less expensive, but equally effective pump. The seamless integration of expertise from three Amrita campuses (Amritapuri, Coimbatore & Kochi) enabled the development of this user-friendly pump based on dual micro-controller technology, with features not found in other designs. Thanks to Amrita’s insulin pump inventors, India could be better equipped to treat the rising numbers of diabetic patients and manage the problems associated with this complex disease. Continue reading >>

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

Touchscreen Meets Insulin Pump In Tandem’s New T:slim

“Design is a funny word. Some people think design means how it looks. But of course, if you dig deeper, it's really how it works … To design something really well, you have to get it. You have to really grok what it’s all about. It takes a passionate commitment to really thoroughly understand something, chew it up, not just quickly swallow it. Most people don’t take the time to do that.” Those were the words of the late Steve Jobs in an interview with Wired in February 1996. More than a decade later, Tandem Diabetes Care took this idea to heart with its new t:slim touchscreen insulin pump, which it designed after conducting a remarkable 4,000 in-depth interviews with patients, healthcare providers, and caregivers. Tandem really wanted to get inside the minds of people who take insulin – pumpers and non-pumpers alike. The new pump was approved by the FDA in November 2011 (see new now next in diaTribe #38) and launched just last month. I was able to get trained on the t:slim at Tandem’s San Diego headquarters soon after it launched, and what follows is my experience wearing the device over the past week. So far, three themes have emerged: some clear differences from other pumps, a focus on simplicity and convenience, and an attention to safety. Part One: Differences from Other Pumps Adam’s Favorites iPhone-like touchscreen Rechargeable battery Highly customizable “personal profiles” for insulin delivery From the minute I opened the shipping box, it was clear that the t:slim pump was somewhat different from other pumps I’ve used – included with the pump were a USB charging cable and adapters for both the wall and car. Even the included user manual comes on a credit-card-like thumb drive. But the most obvious difference between the t:slim and other p Continue reading >>

How Much Does Insulin Pump Cost

How Much Does Insulin Pump Cost

The food our stomach digests are changed into glucose. Glucose is a kind of sugar that travels inside our body into the bloodstream and cells. This glucose is allowed by the insulin which is produced by our pancreas to enter the body and give it energy. Without insulin, our body will not be able to get the glucose we need, our cells will starve and the glucose in our blood will increase. If our body has irregular dosages of insulin, we could be diagnosed with diabetes. People with diabetes, will need insulin shots and pumps. But how much does insulin pump cost? We’ll discuss this further as we learn more about diabetes and its treatment. Without The Insulin Pump If a person with diabetes does not have his insulin level regulated, aside from having their blood glucose rise, they will also experience the following: urination more than the usual, often thirsty, losing weight, always hungry and tired, has dry and itchy skin, have sores that slowly heal, has blurry eyesight, tingling sensation in feet and hands, and sexual dysfunction. Diabetes is a chronic disease, which means it does not go away, but if left uncontrolled, it could progress and could lead to much damage in the body like, loosing eyesight and legs having to be amputated and other grave complications. Good thing, diabetes can be controlled and people who are affected by it are still able to live life to the fullest as they take their insulin, through the pump, but many are not yet familiar regarding the cost of diabetic pump. Getting An Insulin Pump In order to get an insulin pump, you will have to get a doctor’s prescription first. However, according to the Diabetes Self-Management website, not many doctors are familiar with insulin pump, and that out of the 25,000 doctors in the United States, only 2,00 Continue reading >>

A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Of Sensor-augmented Insulin Pump Therapy And Automated Insulin Suspension Versus Standard Pump Therapy For Hypoglycemic Unaware Patients With Type 1 Diabetes☆☆☆

A Cost-effectiveness Analysis Of Sensor-augmented Insulin Pump Therapy And Automated Insulin Suspension Versus Standard Pump Therapy For Hypoglycemic Unaware Patients With Type 1 Diabetes☆☆☆

Abstract To assess the cost-effectiveness of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with “Low Glucose Suspend” (LGS) functionality versus standard pump therapy with self-monitoring of blood glucose in patients with type 1 diabetes who have impaired awareness of hypoglycemia. A clinical trial–based economic evaluation was performed in which the net costs and effectiveness of the two treatment modalities were calculated and expressed as an incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER). The clinical outcome of interest for the evaluation was the rate of severe hypoglycemia in each arm of the LGS study. Quality-of-life utility scores were calculated using the three-level EuroQol five-dimensional questionnaire. Resource use costs were estimated using public sources. After 6 months, the use of sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with LGS significantly reduced the incidence of severe hypoglycemia compared with standard pump therapy (incident rate difference 1.85 [0.17–3.53]; P = 0.037). Based on a primary randomized study, the ICER per severe hypoglycemic event avoided was $18,257 for all patients and $14,944 for those aged 12 years and older. Including all major medical resource costs (e.g., hospital admissions), the ICERs were $17,602 and $14,289, respectively. Over the 6-month period, the cost per quality-adjusted life-year gained was $40,803 for patients aged 12 years and older. Based on the Australian experience evaluating new interventions across a broad range of therapeutic areas, sensor-augmented insulin pump therapy with LGS may be considered a cost-effective alternative to standard pump therapy with self-monitoring of blood glucose in hypoglycemia unaware patients with type 1 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes An Expensive Disease For Many Canadians, Costing On Average $2.5k Annually

Diabetes An Expensive Disease For Many Canadians, Costing On Average $2.5k Annually

More Days after his Grade 8 graduation, Julie Vanderschot’s 13-year-old son began to have blurry vision and stomach pains. He was rapidly losing weight, had difficulty chewing, was insatiably thirsty and frequently needed to use the bathroom. At the same time, he was taking medication to treat an infected tendon in his foot, which he’d hurt in a bicycle accident. “We initially mistook some of the symptoms as side effects of the antibiotics,” said Vanderschot, a policy analyst in Ottawa. Her son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune disease in which the pancreas can’t produce insulin because the immune system attacks and destroys the cells that produce it. Insulin is a crucial hormone that helps shuttle glucose from the blood into the body’s cells where it’s used as an energy source. In the weeks and months that followed, the family attended training and education sessions at the Children's Hospital of Eastern Ontario (CHEO), learning how to test blood-glucose levels, administer insulin and adjust dosages, count carbohydrates and manage diet. Vanderschot’s son now sees an endocrinologist every three months. A report from the Canadian Institute of Health released earlier in November, which is National Diabetes Month, noted that Canada has one of the highest rates of diabetes in the world. More than nine million people are living with diabetes or pre-diabetes in this country. It’s a chronic condition that takes a physical toll and has expensive recurring drug fees.For those who are living with the condition, it’s an expensive situation. Under The Canada Health Act, pharmaceuticals and blood-glucose monitoring are covered when administered in hospitals, but if they’re not in a medical ward, diabetics who lack private insurance or those who Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy In Alberta

Insulin Pump Therapy In Alberta

Insulin pump therapy (IPT) is a diabetes management method that uses a pump to administer insulin rather than by multiple daily injections. An insulin pump is a small, battery-powered computer that is about the size of a pager. The pump is programmed to give small continuous amounts of insulin from the reservoir through the cannula under the skin. The pump is not an artificial pancreas, blood glucose levels still need to be monitored, and the user must program the pump to provide the appropriate amount of fast-acting insulin. This method most closely matches the body’s normal release of insulin. In Canada insulin pumps cost between $6000-$8000 not including the cost of associated supplies. To learn more about insulin pump therapy and it’s benefits for your patients a local representative of the insulin pump companies can come to you. Their contact information can be found below. Alberta Insulin Pump Therapy Program As of May 2013, the Alberta Government provides funding to help with the cost of insulin pumps and supplies for Albertans with Type 1 Diabetes who meet their set of eligibility requirements. People with Type 2 Diabetes may also require IPT but the associated costs are not covered through this program, and must be met by the patient and their employer-sponsored or private insurance. The program funds the full cost of the insulin pump as well as all supplies required minus any amounts covered through government-sponsored agencies and patients’ employer-sponsored or private insurance programs. Eligibility criteria for the IPT program include The patient must be a resident of Alberta who is eligible for coverage under the Alberta Health Care Insurance Plan. The patient must have been diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes and be under the care of a physician or nur Continue reading >>

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

Is My Test, Item, Or Service Covered?

How often is it covered? Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) doesn’t cover insulin (unless use of an insulin pump is medically necessary), insulin pens, syringes, needles, alcohol swabs, or gauze. Medicare prescription drug coverage (Part D) may cover insulin and certain medical supplies used to inject insulin, like syringes, gauze, and alcohol swabs. If you use an external insulin pump, insulin and the pump may be covered as durable medical equipment (DME). However, suppliers of insulin pumps may not necessarily provide insulin. For more information, see durable medical equipment. Your costs in Original Medicare You pay 100% for insulin (unless used with an insulin pump, then you pay 20% of the Medicare-approved amount, and the Part B deductible applies). You pay 100% for syringes and needles, unless you have Part D. To find out how much your specific test, item, or service will cost, talk to your doctor or other health care provider. The specific amount you’ll owe may depend on several things, like: Other insurance you may have How much your doctor charges Whether your doctor accepts assignment The type of facility The location where you get your test, item, or service Continue reading >>

More in insulin