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What Is Metformin And What Is It Used For?

Metformin Hcl

Metformin Hcl

Uses Metformin is used with a proper diet and exercise program and possibly with other medications to control high blood sugar. It is used in patients with type 2 diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Metformin works by helping to restore your body's proper response to the insulin you naturally produce. It also decreases the amount of sugar that your liver makes and that your stomach/intestines absorb. How to use Metformin HCL Read the Patient Information Leaflet if available from your pharmacist before you start taking metformin and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, consult your doctor or pharmacist. Take this medication by mouth as directed by your doctor, usually 1-3 times a day with meals. Drink plenty of fluids while taking this medication unless otherwise directed by your doctor. The dosage is based on your medical condition, response to treatment, and other medications you may be taking. Be sure to tell your doctor and pharmacist about all the products you use (including prescription drugs, nonprescription drugs, and herbal products). To reduce your risk of side effects (such as upset stomach), your doctor may direct you to start this medication at a low dose and gradually increase your dose. Follow your doctor's instructions carefully. Take this medication regularly in order to get the most benefit from it. Remember to use it at the same times each day. If you are already taking another diabetes drug (such as chlorpropamide), follow your doctor's directions carefully for stopping/continuing the old drug and starting metformin. Check your blood sugar regularly a Continue reading >>

What Health Problems Besides Diabetes May Be Treated With Metformin?

What Health Problems Besides Diabetes May Be Treated With Metformin?

Insulin resistance is one of the key factors leading to diabetes, but it is increasingly recognized as an important issue in other settings as well. Insulin resistance itself increases the risk of cardiovascular disease, and most physicians now consider pre-diabetes to be a serious condition, not only because of the likely progression to diabetes but also because heart disease risk is higher in people with blood sugars in the pre-diabetic range than in those with normal blood sugar levels. Many physicians and diabetes researchers think it's appropriate to treat people with pre-diabetes with metformin, and some even advocate the use of metformin in a person with abdominal obesity, even if he or she has normal blood sugar levels. In addition, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) is often treated with metformin. PCOS is a metabolic disorder that affects women of childbearing age. The symptoms include irregular periods and infertility, as well as excessive facial and body hair, acne, and hair loss from the scalp. PCOS is a complex disorder and not fully understood, but a major part of its cause appears to be insulin resistance. A high percentage of women with PCOS are also overweight. Metformin treatment sometimes helps with weight loss, often corrects irregular menstrual periods, and definitely improves fertility. In fact, because PCOS is one of the most common causes of infertility, metformin, a medication thought of as a diabetes drug, is also one of the most widely used infertility treatments. It's important to emphasize that all uses of metformin other than the treatment of diabetes are "off label." That is, the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has not approved metformin for use in these areas, but it is often of benefit and physicians frequently prescribe it for these p Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Fortamet Glucophage Glucophage XR Glumetza Riomet Descriptions Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, the amount of metformin you take must be balanced against the amount and type of food you eat and the amount of exercise you do. If you change your diet or exercise, you will want to test your blood sugar to find out if it is too low. Your doctor will teach you what to do if this happens. Metformin does not help patients does not help patients who have insulin-dependent or type 1 diabetes because they cannot produce insulin from their pancreas gland. Their blood glucose is best controlled by insulin injections. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Tablet Tablet, Extended Release Solution Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Medicine: Metformin

Diabetes Medicine: Metformin

If you have diabetes, chances are you’re taking some type of medicine to help control it. If you have Type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin. But with Type 2 diabetes, there are many options, ranging from no medicine to diabetes pills to non-insulin injectables to insulin. While you may be able to manage your diabetes with healthy eating, weight control, and physical activity, there’s a high likelihood that at some point, you may need to take medication, including insulin. Unless your blood sugar and A1C levels are quite high, you would likely start on a type of diabetes pill. Today, there are nine classes of diabetes pills. Some are more commonly used (and more effective) than others: • Metformin • Sulfonylureas • Meglitinides • Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) • DPP-4 inhibitors • SGLT2 inhibitors • Alpha-glucosidase inhibitors • GLP-1 agonists • Bile acid sequestrants And to add to the mix, many of these medicines are available in combination form; for example, metformin can be combined with a sulfonylurea, a DPP-4 inhibitor, TZDs, or an SGLT2 inhibitor. Combination pills can save time and money and make pill-taking easier. This week, we’ll focus on one of the most commonly prescribed diabetes pills: metformin. What is metformin? Metformin is a medicine in a class called biguanides. It lowers blood sugar levels by decreasing the amount of glucose released into the bloodstream by the liver. Metformin is also an “insulin sensitizer,” meaning that it works to make the cells in your body more receptive to insulin. When cells are insulin sensitive, they are able to take more glucose from the blood to be used for energy. Because metformin does not signal the pancreas to release insulin, there is little risk of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) when taking Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Diabetes Drugs: Metformin

Editor’s Note: This is the second post in our miniseries about diabetes drugs. Tune in on August 21 for the next installment. Metformin (brand names Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Riomet, Fortamet, Glumetza) is a member of a class of medicines known as biguanides. This type of medicine was first introduced into clinical practice in the 1950’s with a drug called phenformin. Unfortunately, phenformin was found to be associated with lactic acidosis, a serious and often fatal condition, and was removed from the U.S. market in 1977. This situation most likely slowed the approval of metformin, which was not used in the U.S. until 1995. (By comparison, metformin has been used in Europe since the 1960’s.) The U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) required large safety studies of metformin, the results of which demonstrated that the development of lactic acidosis as a result of metformin therapy is very rare. (A finding that has been confirmed in many other clinical trials to date.) Of note, the FDA officer involved in removing phenformin from the market recently wrote an article highlighting the safety of metformin. Metformin works primarily by decreasing the amount of glucose made by the liver. It does this by activating a protein known as AMP-activated protein kinase, or AMPK. This protein acts much like an “energy sensor,” setting off cellular activities that result in glucose storage, enhanced entry of glucose into cells, and decreased creation of fatty acids and cholesterol. A secondary effect of the enhanced entry of glucose into cells is improved glucose uptake and increased storage of glycogen (a form of glucose) by the muscles. Additionally, the decrease in fatty acid levels brought about by metformin may indirectly improve insulin resistance and beta cell func Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin may rarely cause a serious, life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you have kidney disease. Your doctor will probably tell you not to take metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you are over 65 years old and if you have ever had a heart attack; stroke; diabetic ketoacidosis (blood sugar that is high enough to cause severe symptoms and requires emergency medical treatment); a coma; or heart or liver disease. Taking certain other medications with metformin may increase the risk of lactic acidosis. Tell your doctor if you are taking acetazolamide (Diamox), dichlorphenamide (Keveyis), methazolamide, topiramate (Topamax, in Qsymia), or zonisamide (Zonegran). Tell your doctor if you have recently had any of the following conditions, or if you develop them during treatment: serious infection; severe diarrhea, vomiting, or fever; or if you drink much less fluid than usual for any reason. You may have to stop taking metformin until you recover. If you are having surgery, including dental surgery, or any major medical procedure, tell the doctor that you are taking metformin. Also, tell your doctor if you plan to have any x-ray procedure in which dye is injected, especially if you drink or have ever drunk large amounts of alcohol or have or have had liver disease or heart failure. You may need to stop taking metformin before the procedure and wait 48 hours to restart treatment. Your doctor will tell you exactly when you should stop taking metformin and when you should start taking it again. If you experience any of the following symptoms, stop taking metformin and call your doctor immediately: extreme tiredness, weakness, or discomfort; nausea; vomiting; stomach pain; decreased appetite; deep and rapid breathing or shortness of breath; dizzi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Proves Useful For Other Problems

Diabetes Drug Metformin Proves Useful For Other Problems

Early research suggests the decades-old diabetes drug metformin can slow cancer, reduce heart disease and perhaps limit the ravages of Alzheimer's. A new study shows it can extend lifespan in mice. Could metformin, the most widely used diabetes drug in the world, be useful for fighting a number of health problems? Early research suggests the decades-old drug can slow cancer, reduce heart disease and maybe even limit the ravages of Alzheimer's. Now, a new study in mice finds that it can extend life by a number of weeks — the human equivalent of 3-4 years. It's far too soon for healthy people to consider taking the drug, researchers say, but the findings are provocative, and suggest science is getting closer to a day when it may be possible to pop a pill to live healthier longer. Diseases of aging, like cancer, heart disease, type 2 diabetes and dementia are all linked along a biological pathway, researchers say. Eating less food appears to trigger that cascade, significantly extending life in animals, probably by slowing down metabolism. Metformin is the third drug shown in early research to affect the same pathway, along with rapamycin, a powerful medication used to prevent rejection of transplanted organs; and resveratrol, a compound found in red wine. "It's clear that we are edging toward developing a pharmaceutical intervention that is going to be able to delay or postpone aging," said Rafael de Cabo, a biogerontologist at the National Institute of Aging, who conducted the new mouse study, published today in Nature Communications. "For how much and how long I have no idea." Brian Kennedy, CEO of The Buck Institute for Research on Aging in Novato, Calif., said he envisions a day when, instead of giving people drugs after they get sick, healthy people will be able to Continue reading >>

Fortamet

Fortamet

FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets DESCRIPTION FORTAMET® (metformin hydrochloride) Extended-Release Tablets contain an oral antihyperglycemic drug used in the management of type 2 diabetes. Metformin hydrochloride (N, Ndimethylimidodicarbonimidic diamide hydrochloride) is a member of the biguanide class of oral antihyperglycemics and is not chemically or pharmacologically related to any other class of oral antihyperglycemic agents. The empirical formula of metformin hydrochloride is C4H11N5•HCl and its molecular weight is 165.63. Its structural formula is: Metformin hydrochloride is a white to off-white crystalline powder that is freely soluble in water and is practically insoluble in acetone, ether, and chloroform. The pKa of metformin is 12.4. The pH of a 1% aqueous solution of metformin hydrochloride is 6.68. FORTAMET® Extended-Release Tablets are designed for once-a-day oral administration and deliver 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin hydrochloride. In addition to the active ingredient metformin hydrochloride, each tablet contains the following inactive ingredients: candellila wax, cellulose acetate, hypromellose, magnesium stearate, polyethylene glycols (PEG 400, PEG 8000), polysorbate 80, povidone, sodium lauryl sulfate, synthetic black iron oxides, titanium dioxide, and triacetin. FORTAMET® meets USP Dissolution Test 5. System Components And Performance FORTAMET® was developed as an extended-release formulation of metformin hydrochloride and designed for once-a-day oral administration using the patented single-composition osmotic technology (SCOT™). The tablet is similar in appearance to other film-coated oral administered tablets but it consists of an osmotically active core formulation that is surrounded by a semipermeable membra Continue reading >>

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Glumetza Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Generic Name: metformin (Pronunciation: met FOR min) What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is the most important information I should know about metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? What is metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin (Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficult breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness; numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs; trouble breathing; feeling dizzy, light-headed, tired, or very weak; stomach pain, nausea with vomiting; or slow or uneven heart rate. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effect such as: feeling short of breath, even with mild exertion; swelling or rapid weight gain; or fever, chills, body aches, flu symptoms. Les Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

Commonly Used Brand Name(s)Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet Therapeutic ClassificationsHypoglycemic QUICK LINKS Oral route (Tablet;Tablet, Extended Release;Solution) Death, hypothermia, hypotension, and resistant bradyarrhythmias have been reported due to metformin-associated lactic acidosis. Onset may be subtle and include nonspecific symptoms such as malaise, myalgia, respiratory distress, somnolence, and abdominal distress; laboratory abnormalities include low pH, increased anion gap and elevated blood lactate. The risk of lactic acidosis increases with renal or hepatic impairment, aged 65 years or older, having a radiological study with contrast, surgery, or other procedures, hypoxic states, and excessive alcohol intake. If lactic acidosis is suspected, metformin hydrochloride should be discontinued, supportive measures started in a hospital setting. Prompt hemodialysis is recommended . Save up to 85% on Metformin Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Average Retail Price: $27.12 Lowest GoodRx Price $4.00 View All Prices Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels that are caused by a type of diabetes mellitus or sugar diabetes called type 2 diabetes. With this type of diabetes, insulin produced by the pancreas is not able to get sugar into the cells of the body where it can work properly. Using metformin alone, with a type of oral antidiabetic medicine called a sulfonylurea, or with insulin, will help to lower blood sugar when it is too high and help restore the way you use food to make energy. Many people can control type 2 diabetes with diet and exercise. Following a specially planned diet and exercise will always be important when you have diabetes, even when you are taking medicines. To work properly, t Continue reading >>

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

Metformin: Uses, Action, Dosage, Side Effect And Brand Information

What is metformin used for? Controlling blood sugar levels in adults, adolescents and children aged 10 years and over with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is used when diet alone has failed to fully control blood sugar. It may be used on its own, in combination with other oral antidiabetic medicines, or with insulin. Polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). This is an off-licence use of metformin, so you won't find it mentioned in the information leaflets that come with the medicine. However, metformin is a widely used and established treatment option for this condition. How does metformin work? In type 2 diabetes the cells in the body, particularly muscle, fat and liver cells, become resistant to the action of insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for controlling the level of sugar (glucose) in the blood. It makes cells in the body remove sugar from the blood. When the cells are resistant to insulin this makes blood sugar levels rise too high. Metformin hydrochloride is a type of antidiabetic medicine called a biguanide. It works in a number of ways to lower blood sugar levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Firstly, it increases the sensitivity of muscle cells to insulin. This enables these cells to remove sugar from the blood more effectively. Secondly, it reduces the amount of sugar produced by cells in the liver. Finally, it delays the absorption of sugar from the intestines into the bloodstream after eating so that there is less of a spike in blood sugar levels after meals. Metformin is taken regularly every day to help control blood sugar levels both between and directly after meals. In polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS many women have high insulin levels, and as a result their cells become resistant to the action of insulin. The high insulin levels also cause an Continue reading >>

What Is Metformin?

What Is Metformin?

MORE Metformin is a prescription drug used primarily in the treatment of Type II diabetes. It can be used on its own or combined with other medications. In the United States, it is sold under the brand names Fortamet, Glucophage, Glumetza and Riomet. "Metformin is very often prescribed as the first step in a diabetic's regime," said Ken Sternfeld, a New York-based pharmacist. How it works "When you're diabetic you lose the ability to use the insulin you need to offset the food," Sternfeld explained. "If you eat a carb or sugar that can't be metabolized or offset by the insulin you produce, your sugar levels will be higher. Metformin and drugs in that category will help your body better metabolize that food so that insulin levels will be able to stay more in line." Metformin aims to decrease glucose production in the liver, consequently lowering the levels of glucose in the bloodstream. It also changes the way that your blood cells react to insulin. "It makes them more sensitive to insulin," said Dr. Stephen Neabore, a primary care doctor at the Barnard Medical Center in Washington, D.C. "It makes the same amount of insulin work better. It transports the insulin to the cells in a more effective way." Metformin may have a preventive health role, as well. New research presented at the American Diabetes Association 2017 Scientific Sessions showed that long-term use of metformin is particularly useful in preventing the onset of type II diabetes in women who have suffered from gestational diabetes. Because metformin changes the way the body uses insulin, it is not used to treat Type I diabetes, a condition in which the body does not produce insulin at all. Metformin & PCOS Metformin is sometimes prescribed to treat polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS), according to Neabore. "I Continue reading >>

Metformin Overview

Metformin Overview

Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. Metformin belongs to a group of drugs called biguanides, which work by helping your body respond better to the insulin it makes naturally, decreasing the amount of sugar your liver makes, and decreasing the amount of sugar your intestines absorb. This medication comes in tablet, extended-release tablet, and liquid forms. It is taken up to 3 times daily, depending on which form you are taking. Swallow extended-release tablets whole. Common side effects of metformin include diarrhea, nausea, and upset stomach. Metformin is a prescription medication used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication may be prescribed for other uses. Ask your doctor or pharmacist for more information. Metformin may be found in some form under the following brand names: Serious side effects have been reported including: Lactic Acidosis. In rare cases, metformin can cause a serious side effect called lactic acidosis. This is caused by a buildup of lactic acid in your blood. This build-up can cause serious damage. Lactic acidosis caused by metformin is rare and has occurred mostly in people whose kidneys were not working normally. Lactic acidosis has been reported in about one in 33,000 patients taking metformin over the course of a year. Although rare, if lactic acidosis does occur, it can be fatal in up to half the people who develop it. It is also important for your liver to be working normally when you take metformin. Your liver helps remove lactic acid from your blood. Make sure you tell your doctor before you use metformin if you have kidney or liver problems. You should also stop using metformin and call your doctor right away if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Lactic acidosis is a medical emergency that must be treate Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin

Metformin

Metformin, marketed under the trade name Glucophage among others, is the first-line medication for the treatment of type 2 diabetes,[4][5] particularly in people who are overweight.[6] It is also used in the treatment of polycystic ovary syndrome.[4] Limited evidence suggests metformin may prevent the cardiovascular disease and cancer complications of diabetes.[7][8] It is not associated with weight gain.[8] It is taken by mouth.[4] Metformin is generally well tolerated.[9] Common side effects include diarrhea, nausea and abdominal pain.[4] It has a low risk of causing low blood sugar.[4] High blood lactic acid level is a concern if the medication is prescribed inappropriately and in overly large doses.[10] It should not be used in those with significant liver disease or kidney problems.[4] While no clear harm comes from use during pregnancy, insulin is generally preferred for gestational diabetes.[4][11] Metformin is in the biguanide class.[4] It works by decreasing glucose production by the liver and increasing the insulin sensitivity of body tissues.[4] Metformin was discovered in 1922.[12] French physician Jean Sterne began study in humans in the 1950s.[12] It was introduced as a medication in France in 1957 and the United States in 1995.[4][13] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[14] Metformin is believed to be the most widely used medication for diabetes which is taken by mouth.[12] It is available as a generic medication.[4] The wholesale price in the developed world is between 0.21 and 5.55 USD per month as of 2014.[15] In the United States, it costs 5 to 25 USD per month.[4] Medical uses[edit] Metformin is primarily used for type 2 diabetes, but is increasingly be Continue reading >>

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