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What Is Insulin Glargine Used For

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus is the brand name for the synthetic insulin glargine, which is an injectable form of insulin designed to help people with diabetes lower their blood glucose levels. Lantus was manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. Since the patent on Lantus expired in 2015, other biosimilar versions of insulin glargine have been coming to market (such as Toujeo by Sanofi and Basaglar by Lilly). Insulin is the key that unlocks your cells, which allows the sugar in your bloodstream to pass into your cells. This gives them the energy they need to do their various jobs. As a result, your blood sugar levels go down. Lantus is considered a basal insulin. It’s in the long-acting class and is administered once a day. It is injected as a clear liquid but then it forms small particles inside the body. These particles dissolve slowly, releasing the medication evenly over time. Lantus works more slowly than natural insulin and therefore allows for a much more stable blood sugar level throughout a 24-hour period. Because Lantus keeps working for 24 hours, most people should inject at the same time of day. In general, Lantus begins working about one to two hours after injection, peaks in six hours, and continues working for 18 to 26 hours. However, everyone is different. For some people, Lantus does not last a full 24 hours, so they see higher glucose numbers for the couple hours before injection time. Others find that Lantus lasts longer for them, so the previous day’s dose may still be working for a couple hours past injection time. It’s a good idea to check your blood sugar often while you’re adjusting to Lantus. Learn how it works in your own body and then you can talk to your doctor about making adjustments, if necessary. Lantus is available in pre-filled devices, known as SoloSTAR Pens Continue reading >>

What's The Difference Between Insulin Nph And 70/30?

What's The Difference Between Insulin Nph And 70/30?

NPH(Neutralized Protamine Hagedorm) aka Protamine Insulin refers to an long acting preparation of Insulin. It has a moderately long duration of action and slower onset as compared to regular insulin. HM 30/70 is a mixture of Regular Insulin with Isophane Insulin in a 30:70 ratio. It is used a simpler alternative for administering the two different forms of insulin to the patient. The point is that goal of any regimen used for insulin based treatment is to replicate the natural curve of insulin concentration seen in the body, Ideally that means giving one very long acting preparation such as Insulin Glargine or Detemir or Degludec at night to meet the basal demands and then following it up with a very short acting preparation such as Insulin Lispro/Aspart/Glulisine just before EVERY meal. This would mean a myriad of inconvenient injections. This regimen is used mainly in Type 1 DM where insulin is necessary for survival. For Type 2 DM, we use HM 30/70 for convenience since it contains a moderately long acting and one intermediate acting insulin so, it is sort of a midway between the two extremes. Regular insulin in this preparation takes care of immediate post prandial hyperglycemia and Isophane Insulin takes care of reactionary hyperglycemia occuring after few hours of meal. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Way To Use Insulin As A Supplement For Gaining Lean Muscle?

What Is The Best Way To Use Insulin As A Supplement For Gaining Lean Muscle?

If you use insulin, you are basically accepting that you will gain fat at the same time as you are gaining muscle. This is a valid mode of training used by some bodybuilders: first bulk up (both muscle and body fat), then cut (body fat). Adding to what Philip Mikal wrote, if you are looking for the benefits of insulin, the safe way to do it is not through injection but through eating carbs. You might consider the GOMAD (Gallon of Milk a Day) protocol, which is claimed by some bodybuilders as the cheapest and most effective way of increasing muscle mass, even though you will definitely also gain body fat at the same time. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Insulin Glargine (rx)

Dosage Forms & Strengths injectable solution 100 units/mL (Lantus; 10mL vial) 100 units/mL (Lantus SoloSTAR; Basaglar KwikPen; 3 mL disposable prefilled pens) 300 units/mL (Toujeo; 1.5 mL SolosStar disposable prefilled pen) Note: Recent studies have suggested that glargine-300 extends blood glucose control well beyond 24 hr Type 1 or 2 Diabetes Mellitus Lantus and Toujeo are recombinant human insulin analogs indicated to improve glycemic control in adults with type 1 or 2 diabetes mellitus Dosing Considerations Indicated for once-daily SC administration; exhibits relatively constant glucose-lowering profile over 24 hr May be administered at any time during the day; should be administered SC once daily at the same time every day Dose must be individualized based on clinical response; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Patients adjusting the amount or timing of dosage should do so only under medical supervision with appropriate glucose monitoring In patients with type 1 diabetes, insulin glargine must be used in regimens with short-acting insulin Should not be administered IV or via an insulin pump; IV administration of the usual SC dose could result in severe hypoglycemia As with all insulins, injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh, or deltoid) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy; no clinically relevant difference in insulin glargine absorption after abdominal, deltoid, or thigh SC administration As with all insulins, the rate of absorption and, consequently, the onset and duration of action may be affected by exercise and other variables (eg, stress, intercurrent illness, changes in coadministered drugs, meal patterns) Type 1 diabetes mellitus: Starting dose sho Continue reading >>

What Do Primary Care Doctors Want Most From Basal Insulin?

What Do Primary Care Doctors Want Most From Basal Insulin?

All doctors involved in diabetes care want a stable really long acting insulin - so not the by now obsolete (but cheap) NPH insulin of the past, but the newer insulin analogues, Insulin Detemir, Insulin Glargine or the newest and most stable insulin Degludec - that doesn't cause nightly low blood sugars, is stable and has reproducible effects on one's blood sugar in the same patient, and ideally also between patients, keeping the blood sugar levels before meals low without being hypoglycemic when not having eaten for a longer time e.g. nights. This is another study comparing the effects of Insulin Glargine and Insulin Degludec, at present the most stable and longacting insulin available Degludec also has the least intraindividual variability: U300 Glargine is available though, thanks anon for reminding me, although I couldn't find a head to head comparison between the effects of Insuline Degludec and U300 Glargine is seems more stable than U100 Glargine see This overview would be useful to anyone interested: The post-meal blood sugar control is left to the body's own residual insulin production, aided by oral meds e.g. metformin, maybe sulfonylurea derivatives, even injectable Glucagon-like peptide-1 agonist, but that is more for an internist or endocrinologist/diabetologist to prescribe. The effect would be something like this (in this example we inject rapid acting insulin analogues when having a meal as often as one has a meal) At present Novo Nordisk in the US has refiled for FDA approval for their newest long acting insulin analogue Degludec (Tresiba®), in Europe it already is available. So for the US Insulin Glargine seems to be the best available long acting insulin analogue. Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Form Of Insulin For Diabetes? Synthetic Or Human Insulin And Why?

What Is The Best Form Of Insulin For Diabetes? Synthetic Or Human Insulin And Why?

We want to mimic the body's own insulin by injecting insulin of different kinds multiple times a day. First we need a super-stable super-long acting insulin which will be continuously effective over 24+ hours, without troughs and peaks, only the newest synthetic analogues do this, the most stable being Novo Nordisk's new Insulin degludec (Tresiba®), before that we had Aventis' quite acceptable Insulin glargine (Lantus®) and NovoNordisk's Insulin detemir (Levemir®). As you can see the glucose needed to be infused to keep the blood glucose level steady over time after Insulin Degludec is stable, but after 8-10 hours rises, peaking at 14-16 hours and going down a lot at 18-20 hours after Insuline Glargine injection: So Insulin Degludec seems more stable than Insulin Glargine. We also want the effect of an insulin to be consistent (the same after each injection on different days): You can see why the old NPH insulin has had its day, peaking at 8 hours and losing potency after 16 hours: If the pancreas is still making enough insulin to regulate the blood sugar after meals, we only need one usually injection of a super long acting insulin analogue before bedtime to keep the blood sugar levels before meals low so the patient's own pancreas by making its own insulin can regulate the blood sugar levels after meals. When this isn't possible anymore, we would opt for superfast, supershort acting insulin analogues, like Eli Lilly's Insulin lispro (Humalog®), NovoNordisk's Insulin aspart (Novorapid®) and Sanofi Adventis' Insulin glulisine (Apidra®) to be injected at the beginning of each meal (and any snack containing enough carbs) to regulate the after meals blood sugar. The so called regular insulin, which only starts working after 2+ hours (the analogues start working after Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Lantus (insulin Glargine)

Tweet Lantus is an analogue insulin produced by Sanofi-Aventis with the medical name insulin glargine. Lantus has been available for pharmaceutical use since the year 2000. Lantus hit the news in June 2009 over concerns that it may lead to the formation of cancer. However, the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) found the evidence suggesting the link to be inconclusive and cleared the drug for further use. What is Lantus? Lantus is an ultralente (long acting) analogue insulin. The medical name for Lantus, insulin glargine, is taken from how the DNA of human insulin is modified to form the analogue. In glargine’s case, glycine and two arginines are part of the genetic recombination that helps to produce the insulin. Who is Lantus prescribed to? Lantus can be prescribed for all types of diabetes. However, it is most commonly prescribed to people with type 1 diabetes. Lantus may be prescribed to people with type 2 diabetes for whom oral hypoglycemic agents have not shown to be sufficiently effective. How do I take Lantus? Lantus is injected, usually once daily at the same time each day. Like all insulins, Lantus should be injected subcutaneously (into the fatty tissue underneath the skin). The specific mode of action of Lantus means that it should never be diluted or mixed with any other insulin before injecting. Benefits of Lantus The mode of action of Lantus allows for a peakless profile. Lantus has become a popularly prescribed insulin as its consistent activity can help to reduce nocturnal hypoglycaemia. Side effects of Lantus Being an insulin, hypoglycemia can be a relatively common side effect of using Lantus, if dosages are too strong. Other side effects include allergic reactions and swelling, itching or pain at the injection site. Lantus and cancer link In June 200 Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine Pen

Insulin Glargine Pen

Uses Insulin glargine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Insulin glargine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It acts longer than regular insulin, providing a low, steady level of insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. Insulin glargine may be used with a shorter-acting insulin product. It may also be used alone or with other diabetes drugs. How to use Insulin Glargine Pen Read the Patient Information Leaflet and Instructions for Use if available from your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. This insulin product is a concentrated form of standard insulin (3 times as much insulin in each milliliter). Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Check that you are using the correct insulin before injecting this medication. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin glargine should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin glargine may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the upper arm. Do not Continue reading >>

Lantus Patient Information Including Side Effects

Lantus Patient Information Including Side Effects

Brand Names: Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen Generic Name: insulin glargine (Pronunciation: IN su lin AS part, IN su lin AS part PRO ta meen) What is the most important information I should know about insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before using insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? What is insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Insulin glargine is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting form of insulin that is slightly different from other forms of insulin that are not man-made. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin glargine (Lantus, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge, Lantus Solostar Pen)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin glargine. Symptoms include headache, hunger, weakness, sweating, tremors, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, fainting, or seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Carry hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin glargine. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

Insulin Glargine (lantus)

What is INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE, and how does it work (mechanism of action)? Insulin glargine is a bioengineered (man-made) injectable form of long-acting insulin that is used to regulate sugar (glucose) levels in type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Individuals with type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own; and individuals with type 2 diabetes do not produce enough insulin, or insulin is not as effective due to insulin resistance. Insulin glargine works the same way as natural human insulin, but it's action lasts longer. It helps diabetic patients regulate glucose or sugar in the body. Insulin glargine works by promoting movement of sugar from blood into body tissues and also stops sugar production in liver. Insulin glargine is man-made insulin that mimics the actions of human insulin. The FDA approved insulin glargine in April 2000. What are the side effects of INSULIN GLARGINE-INJECTABLE? Common side effects of insulin glargine are: Local allergic reactions that may occur at the injection sites are: Long term use of insulin glargine can lead to thickening of fat tissues at the injection site. Severe allergic reactions are: Swelling under the skin Bronchospasm (tightening of chest that leads to difficulty breathing) Individuals should contact a healthcare professional if they experience any of the above reactions. What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Type 2 diabetes can affect all people, regardless of age. Early symptoms of type 2 diabetes may be missed, so those affected may not even know they have the condition. An estimated one out of every three people within the early stages of type 2 diabetes are not aware they have it. Diabetes interferes with the body's ability to metabolize carbohydrates for energy, leading to high levels of blood sugar. These chronically high blo Continue reading >>

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Get To Know The Lantus® Solostar® Pen

Do not take Lantus® during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin or any of the inactive ingredients in Lantus®. Do not share needles, insulin pens, or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. Before starting Lantus®, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant or if you are breast-feeding or planning to breast-feed. Heart failure can occur if you are taking insulin together with certain medicines called TZDs (thiazolidinediones), even if you have never had heart failure or other heart problems. If you already have heart failure, it may get worse while you take TZDs with Lantus®. Your treatment with TZDs and Lantus® may need to be changed or stopped by your doctor if you have new or worsening heart failure. Tell your doctor if you have any new or worsening symptoms of heart failure, including: Sudden weight gain Tell your doctor about all the medications you take, including OTC medicines, vitamins, and supplements, including herbal supplements. Lantus® should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Lantus®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Do NOT dilute or mix Lantus® with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. Lantus® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. While using Lantus®, do not drive or operate heavy machinery until Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Indication BASAGLAR is a long-acting insulin used to control high blood sugar in adults and children with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 2 diabetes. Limitation of Use BASAGLAR is not for treating diabetic ketoacidosis. Important Safety Information Do not take BASAGLAR during episodes of low blood sugar or if you are allergic to insulin glargine or any of the ingredients in BASAGLAR. Do NOT reuse needles or share insulin pens, even if the needle has been changed. Before starting BASAGLAR, tell your doctor about all your medical conditions, including if you have liver or kidney problems, if you are pregnant or planning to become pregnant, or if you are breastfeeding or planning to breastfeed. BASAGLAR should be taken once a day at the same time every day. Test your blood sugar levels while using insulin. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. The most common side effect of insulin, including BASAGLAR, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious and life threatening. Signs and symptoms may include dizziness or light-headedness, sweating, confusion, headache, blurred vision, slurred speech, shakiness, fast heartbeat, anxiety, irritability, mood change, or hunger. Do NOT dilute or mix BASAGLAR with any other insulin or solution. It will not work as intended and you may lose blood sugar control, which could be serious. BASAGLAR must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Always make sure you have the correct insulin before each injection. BASAGLAR may cause serious side effects that can lead to death, such as severe allergic reactions. Get emergency help if you have: Heart fa Continue reading >>

Description And Brand Names

Description And Brand Names

Drug information provided by: Micromedex US Brand Name Basaglar Lantus Lantus SoloStar Toujeo Descriptions Insulin glargine is a long-acting type of insulin that works slowly, over about 24 hours. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by using the glucose (sugar) in the blood as quick energy. Also, insulin helps us store energy that we can use later. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough insulin or does not use insulin properly. This causes you to have too much sugar in your blood. Like other types of insulin, insulin glargine is used to keep your blood sugar level close to normal. You may have to use insulin glargine in combination with another type of insulin or with a type of oral diabetes medicine to keep your blood sugar under control. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. This product is available in the following dosage forms: Solution Copyright © 2017 Truven Health Analytics Inc. All rights reserved. Information is for End User's use only and may not be sold, redistributed or otherwise used for commercial purposes. Continue reading >>

Insulin Glargine

Insulin Glargine

Generic Name: insulin glargine (IN su lin GLAR gine) Brand Name: Basaglar KwikPen, Lantus, Lantus Solostar Pen, Toujeo SoloStar, Lantus OptiClik Cartridge What is insulin glargine? Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glargine is a long-acting insulin that starts to work several hours after injection and keeps working evenly for 24 hours. Insulin glargine is used to improve blood sugar control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. Insulin glargine is used to treat type 1 or type 2 diabetes in adults, and type 1 diabetes children who are at least 6 years old. Some brands of this medicine are for use only in adults. Carefully follow all instructions for the brand of insulin glargine you are using. Insulin glargine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. Important Information Never share an injection pen or syringe with another person, even if the needle has been changed. Before taking this medicine You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to insulin, or if you are having an episode of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Insulin glargine is not approved for use by anyone younger than 6 years old, and should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in a child of any age. To make sure insulin glargine is safe for you, tell your doctor if you have: liver or kidney disease; low levels of potassium in your blood (hypokalemia); or diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment). Tell your doctor if you also take pioglitazone or rosiglitazone (sometimes contained in combinations with glimepiride or metformin). Taking certain oral diabetes medicines while you are using insulin may increase your risk of serious heart problems. Follow your doctor's instructions about using insulin i Continue reading >>

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