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Canine Diabetes Mellitus - Wsava2011 - Vin

Canine Diabetes Mellitus - Wsava2011 - Vin

World Small Animal Veterinary Association World Congress Proceedings, 2011 Johan P. Schoeman, BVSc, MMedVet(Med), PhD, DSAM, DECVIM-CA Department of Companion Animal Clinical Studies, Faculty of Veterinary Science, University of Pretoria, Onderstepoort, South Africa Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrine disorder, with an incidence of between 1 in 100 to 1 in 500 dogs. The majority of dogs with diabetes mellitus will be successfully stabilised and will remain stable for long periods of time. However a significant minority will either become unstable again or will be difficult to stabilize from the outset. The most common cause for instability is failures in the daily management of the patient. Problems associated with insulin resistance and Somogyi effects are quite rare. When investigating instability always start by checking the daily routine and equipment supplied to the owner, before embarking on a search for complex causes of instability. This paper will focus on diabetic management and the causes of insulin resistance. The main goal is the elimination of owner-observed clinical signs by limiting blood glucose fluctuations and maintaining near-normal blood glucose levels. These are achieved through: Avoidance or management of concurrent inflammatory, infectious, neoplastic or hormonal diseases Insulin is classified according to its promptness, duration and intensity of action. Short acting insulin: This is represented by the crystalline insulin Actrapid. It is used chiefly in the management of DKA. It may be given by any route. It has a rapid onset of action (minutes) and a short duration of effect (hours) and is very potent. Intermediate acting insulin: These are represented by Protophane. They are used mainly in the management of canine DM on a twice daily Continue reading >>

Managing Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Managing Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Veterinary science rapidly developed in recent years, allowing us to better understand diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Canine and feline diabetes can be managed successfully and easily with correct diagnosis and treatment, which includes insulin therapy. Client education and good communication between you the veterinarian and pet owners is vital. Continue reading >>

Caninsulin | Buy Today And Save - Shop Now At Pet Drugs Online

Caninsulin | Buy Today And Save - Shop Now At Pet Drugs Online

Caninsulin(40iu/ml) is for the treatment of insulin deficiency (diabetes mellitus) in dogs and cats. It is supplied in a 10ml vial or separately as 10 x 2.5ml vials and administered by injection using syringe. The active ingredient is porcine insulin which is a naturally occurring hormoneproduced in the pancreas. Caninsulin is a prescription item and will be sent once a valid prescription is received. Please follow the instructions given by your vet. Diabetes Mellitus is a common endocrine disease caused by a deficiency of insulin. As a result of this deficiency, glucose cannot be transported from the bloodstream into the cells. Store Caninsulinupright and keep refrigerated between 2 & 8c. If transporting, always keep below 25C to ensure its efficacy.During periods of hot weather dispatches may be temporarily delayed. Do not freeze. Caninsulin is to be given via injection and to be administered with Caninsulin 0.5ml or 1ml syringes (these can alsobe purchased on our website).The treatment will be divided into "stabilisation" and "maintenance". First, the correct dose needs to be determined and a suitable routine needs to be finalised for both pet and owner (stabilisation). Then, the pet is monitored regularly and if the diabetes evolves, the medication can be changed accordingly (maintenance). This item will only be dispatched Monday-Thursday. If you see the "prescription required" sign next to an item youd like to order, it means the item can only be issued with a prescription. While you can add these items to your shopping cart and pay for them along with other non-prescription products, we cant dispatch them until weve received a prescription. Light (usually non-food) orders under 29 are charged 2.99 postage. Heavy (typically food) orders under 29 are charged 4.49 p Continue reading >>

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Update On Insulin Treatment For Dogs And Cats: Insulin Dosing Pens And More

Authors Thompson A, Lathan P, Fleeman L Accepted for publication 19 February 2015 Checked for plagiarism Yes Peer reviewer comments 3 1School of Veterinary Science, The University of Queensland, Gatton, QLD, Australia; 2College of Veterinary Medicine Mississippi State University, Starkville, MS, USA; 3Animal Diabetes Australia, Melbourne, VIC, Australia Abstract: Insulin therapy is still the primary therapy for all diabetic dogs and cats. Several insulin options are available for each species, including veterinary registered products and human insulin preparations. The insulin chosen depends on the individual patient's requirements. Intermediate-acting insulin is usually the first choice for dogs, and longer-acting insulin is the first choice for cats. Once the insulin type is chosen, the best method of insulin administration should be considered. Traditionally, insulin vials and syringes have been used, but insulin pen devices have recently entered the veterinary market. Pens have different handling requirements when compared with standard insulin vials including: storage out of the refrigerator for some insulin preparations once pen cartridges are in use; priming of the pen to ensure a full dose of insulin is administered; and holding the pen device in place for several seconds during the injection. Many different types of pen devices are available, with features such as half-unit dosing, large dials for visually impaired people, and memory that can display the last time and dose of insulin administered. Insulin pens come in both reusable and disposable options. Pens have several benefits over syringes, including improved dose accuracy, especially for low insulin doses. Keywords: diabetes, mellitus, canine, feline, NPH, glargine, porcine lente Introduction Insulin the Continue reading >>

Caninsulin - Managing Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Caninsulin - Managing Diabetes Mellitus In Dogs And Cats

Managing Diabetes Mellitus in dogs and cats Veterinary science has rapidly developed in recent years, allowing us to better understand diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Insulin therapy is the cornerstone of managing canine diabetes. Find information on establishing a complete management regime to suit both animals and their owners. Download a program to calculate dose rates and plot blood glucose curves. Caninsulin, an intermediate-acting insulin, contains porcine insulin. Caninsulin is indicated in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. This web site provides in-depth knowledge on the disease, and serves as a reference for Caninsulin, MSD Animal Health's veterinary insulin. This website is a resource for veterinary surgeons and veterinary nurses. If you are an owner of a diabetic pet or simply would like further information regarding diabetes in pets, please click the below link. Canine and feline diabetes can be managed successfully and easily with correct diagnosis and treatment, which includes insulin therapy. Client education and good communication between the veterinary surgeon and pet owners is vital. Introducing VetPen the first veterinary insulin pen and a breakthrough in pet diabetes management. Read more. Pet owners play a crucial role in the successful management of diabetes mellitus in their pets. Your attitude to diabetes will largely determine the pet owner's motivation and compliance with treatment. Please install Flash Player to see this movie Switching protocol now available. Log in to view. Canine and feline diabetes can be managed successfully with correct diagnosis and treatment, which includes insulin therapy. Continue reading >>

Caninsulin (canada)

Caninsulin (canada)

Manufacturer: Merck Animal Health PORCINE INSULIN ZINC INJECTION (Mfr. Std.) STERILE SUSPENSION 40 I.U./ML FOR VETERINARY USE ONLY DIN 02052474 Description Caninsulin is an intermediate-acting insulin. Each ml of Caninsulin contains highly purified porcine insulin 40 IU (Ph. Eur.) consisting of 30% amorphous zinc insulin and 70% crystalline zinc insulin (“Lente” type). Non medicinal ingredients include (per ml): zinc chloride 0.08 mg, sodium acetate trihydrate 1.36 mg, sodium chloride 7.0 mg and methyl parahydroxybenzoate 0.1% (as preservative). pH is adjusted by adding hydrochloric acid and/or sodium hydroxide. Caninsulin Indications Caninsulin is indicated for the control of hyperglycemia associated with diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Caninsulin Dosage And Administration The starting dose is calculated based on the dog’s or cat’s body weight as directed in the Tables below. Dose-titration is necessary to meet the treatment needs of each individual animal. After a period of acclimatization, a blood glucose curve should be determined and the dose adjusted to achieve satisfactory long term control (see Monitoring and Dose Adjustment section below). Compare Pharmacy Prices Compare Local Prescription Prices. Get a Free Coupon & Save up to 80% goodrx.com STARTING DOSE: Dogs: The recommended starting dose of Caninsulin is 0.5 I.U. per kg of body weight once daily, rounded down to the lowest entire number of units. Some examples are given in the following table. Dog Body Weight Starting Dose Per Dog 5 kg 2 I.U. once daily 10 kg 5 I.U. once daily 15 kg 7 I.U. once daily 20 kg 10 I.U. once daily STARTING DOSE: Cats: The recommended starting dose is 0.25 - 0.5 I.U. per kg of body weight, for a maximum of 2 I.U. per dose, based on blood glucose concentration at diagn Continue reading >>

Caninsulin | Caninsulin For Dogs | Caninsulin For Cats | Caninsulin Syringes

Caninsulin | Caninsulin For Dogs | Caninsulin For Cats | Caninsulin Syringes

Caninsulin 40 iu/ml Suspension for injection *(Porcine insulin present as approximately 30% amorphous Zinc insulin and 70 % crystalline Zinc insulin in a suspension). Preservative: methylparahydroxybenzoate 0.1 % w/v. For full list of excipients, see section Pharmaceutical Particulars. White to nearly white suspension for injection. The product is an intermediate acting insulin product containing porcine insulin, which is structurally identical to canine insulin. It is indicated in cases of diabetes mellitus (insulin deficiency) in dogs and cats, where the required blood levels are achieved by using an individually adjusted dose of the product. The product must not be administered by the intravenous route. The product is a medium duration insulin and is not intended for the treatment of animals with severe acute diabetes presenting in a ketoacidotic state. In the cat diabetic remission is possible. Before the product is administered owners should be instructed to have a box of powdered glucose at home. Signs of hunger, increasing anxiety, unstable locomotion, muscle twitching, stumbling or sinking in the rear legs and disorientation indicate progression of hypoglycaemia and requires immediate administration of glucose solution and food to restore blood glucose levels. Polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia in combination in chronic cases with weight loss, general bad condition, loss of hair or abnormal furry coat and lethargy are the most common clinical symptoms of hyperglycaemia and require administration of insulin to restore blood glucose levels to the normal range. The use of progestagens (oestrus inhibitors) in patients suffering from diabetes mellitus should be avoided. Stress and irregular extra exercise must be avoided. Care must be taken with the use of corticos Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Dogs

Diabetes In Dogs

Illustration of a dog's pancreas. Cell-islet in the illustration refers to a pancreatic cell in the Islets of Langerhans, which contain insulin-producing beta cells and other endocrine related cells. Permanent damage to these beta cells results in Type 1, or insulin-dependent diabetes, for which exogenous insulin replacement therapy is the only answer. Diabetes mellitus is a disease in which the beta cells of the endocrine pancreas either stop producing insulin or can no longer produce it in enough quantity for the body's needs. The condition is commonly divided into two types, depending on the origin of the condition: Type 1 diabetes, sometimes called "juvenile diabetes", is caused by destruction of the beta cells of the pancreas. The condition is also referred to as insulin-dependent diabetes, meaning exogenous insulin injections must replace the insulin the pancreas is no longer capable of producing for the body's needs. Dogs can have insulin-dependent, or Type 1, diabetes; research finds no Type 2 diabetes in dogs.[1][2][3] Because of this, there is no possibility the permanently damaged pancreatic beta cells could re-activate to engender a remission as may be possible with some feline diabetes cases, where the primary type of diabetes is Type 2.[2][4][5] There is another less common form of diabetes, diabetes insipidus, which is a condition of insufficient antidiuretic hormone or resistance to it.[6][7] This most common form of diabetes affects approximately 0.34% of dogs.[8] The condition is treatable and need not shorten the animal's life span or interfere with quality of life.[9] If left untreated, the condition can lead to cataracts, increasing weakness in the legs (neuropathy), malnutrition, ketoacidosis, dehydration, and death.[10] Diabetes mainly affects mid Continue reading >>

Caninsulin

Caninsulin

Diabetes Mellitus - Dogs Diabetes Mellitus is the most common hormonal problem we see in dogs. As in humans, the disease arises when the cells in the pancreas fail to produce the hormone “Insulin” when our dog eats something. After eating, glucose travels from the intestines into the blood and normally triggers the pancreas to release insulin. Insulin then acts like a lock to allow doors in our body cells to open so they can take up the glucose for energy. When no insulin is produced, as in Diabetes Mellitus, the glucose stays in the blood and makes the kidneys think that the blood is concentrated and so this is when you are likely to see the first sign of this disease in your dog – excessive thirst. Other common symptoms to look out for are an increased appetite because your dog is unable to use the energy provided by the food properly and weight loss as your dog’s own body fat and protein is broken down to use as energy. It is at this time that most dogs are brought into our surgery. Diabetes Mellitus is usually diagnosed with a urine test and a blood test. Treatment for diabetes in dogs is a daily insulin injection. The majority of dogs only need one injection a day but some dogs need two. It is important that the injections are given at the same time every day and the dog’s general routine must remain the same on a daily basis ie the same food fed at the same time and similar amounts of exercise each day. The food should be given before the insulin injection. This is because if the dog does not eat prior to the injection being given, it can make the dog become “hypoglycaemic”. This condition occurs because the blood glucose level drops too low and your dog can collapse. This is an emergency situation and your dog should immediately be given some honey Continue reading >>

Frequently Asked Questions About Dog Diabetes | Vetsulin

Frequently Asked Questions About Dog Diabetes | Vetsulin

General signs, such as lethargy and poor coat condition What do the terms polyuria, polydipsia, and polyphagia mean? Polyuria is the production of larger than normal amounts of urine in a given period. Polydipsia is excessive thirst. Polyphagia is excessive hunger. My dog is having problems holding her urine; does that mean she has diabetes? No, your dog could have a bladder or kidney infection, or some other medical problem. If your dog is having problems holding his or her urine, you should schedule a trip to your veterinarian as soon as possible. Your veterinarian will measure your dog's blood glucose and test your dog's urine for the presence of glucose and ketones. Persistently high blood glucose levels along with glucose in the urine usually means that your dog has diabetes mellitus. Dogs of all ages can get diabetes, although it's most common in older dogs. Obesity, genetics, and other conditions can contribute to the development of diabetes. While believed to be underdiagnosed, diabetes mellitus affects an estimated one in 1 in 300 dogs.1 What side effects are associated with diabetes? The most common problems associated with pet diabetes include recurrent infections and cataracts in dogs. Cataract surgery is available for canine diabetics and often can restore vision. What other diseases have the same signs as diabetes? Dogs with diabetes drink and urinate a lot. They may also have a good or increased appetite, but still lose rather than gain weight. To reach a definitive diagnosis of diabetes mellitus, your veterinarian will test your dog's blood glucose levels and urine for the presence of glucose and ketones. No. Diabetes is due to a lack of insulin produced by the pancreas. Diabetes in dogs is thought to be an autoimmune disease. It is not caused by a viru Continue reading >>

Caninsulin Suspension For Injection - From 6.83 Per Vial

Caninsulin Suspension For Injection - From 6.83 Per Vial

Caninsulin 40 IU/ml Suspension for Injection is used in the treatment of diabetes mellitus in dogs and cats. Available in 2.5ml and 10ml vials. In patients with diabetes mellitus, Caninsulin, which is given by subcutaneous injection, helps to lower the blood glucose levels back towards the normal range and control the signs of diabetes mellitus. Diabetes mellitus is diagnosed by your veterinary surgeon. Owners should work with the diagnosing veterinary surgeon to ensure that they are comfortable with the safe dosing and administration of Caninsulin to their pets, and that they know to monitor and react accordingly to signs of hypoglycaemia. Read all product instructions carefully and use as directed by your vet. Treatment of diabetes mellitus requires regular veterinary monitoring and supervision to establish and maintain the correct dose of Caninsulin for your pet. Check product data for full information, contraindications and warnings. This is a temperature controlled product and is dispatched by Courier. Please ensure someone is at the delivery address to sign for the delivery. Please note this product can only be dispatched Monday to Thursday. This product is dispatched in a chill pack to keep it at the correct temperature and should be refrigerated after delivery. This product should be stored between +2C and +8C at all time points, including during the 28 day in-use shelf-life. Shelf life after first opening of the immediate packaging: 28 days. We do not ship Caninsulin to Europe, highlands and islands or Ireland. Continue reading >>

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Your Cat And Diabetes: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetes is a very serious issue – and not just in people either. That’s right, this chronic and potentially debilitating condition also affects cats (and dogs). And while it’s difficult to know the exact incidence of diabetes in cats, best estimates put it somewhere in the range of 1 cat in every 100-200 cats will become diabetic. What’s even sadder is that this incidence seems to be on the increase. Fortunately, armed with some good information, important tips, and a good working relationship with your veterinarian, you can give your cats the best chance at avoiding this frustrating condition. And if they’ve already developed it, know that these same tools can help you best manage your cat’s diabetic state; avoiding the potential complications and perhaps even getting them into diabetic remission. What is diabetes? In the most basic sense, diabetes mellitus is a disorder where blood sugar, or glucose, cannot be effectively utilized and regulated within the body. There are several hormones within the body that play important roles in glucose metabolism. Insulin is one of the most important, if not the most important, and it’s the hormone most central to the development and control of the diabetic state. Glucose fuels the body and insulin is the hormone that helps to get it into most cells within the body. Diabetes is often easily diagnosed and controllable. However, when undiagnosed or poorly managed, diabetes can be devastating. Diabetes can absolutely be managed and your cat can still lead a long and happy life. Routine veterinary care and evaluation are important, as is achieving and maintaining an appropriate weight in your cat and feeding him an appropriate diet. There are two types of diabetes – Type I and Type II. In Type I diabetes, the pancreas Continue reading >>

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin And Weight Gain: Keep The Pounds Off

Insulin and weight gain often go hand in hand, but weight control is possible. If you need insulin therapy, here's how to minimize — or avoid — weight gain. Weight gain is a common side effect for people who take insulin — a hormone that regulates the absorption of sugar (glucose) by cells. This can be frustrating because maintaining a healthy weight is an important part of your overall diabetes management plan. The good news is that it is possible to maintain your weight while taking insulin. The link between insulin and weight gain When you take insulin, glucose is able to enter your cells, and glucose levels in your blood drop. This is the desired treatment goal. But if you take in more calories than you need to maintain a healthy weight — given your level of activity — your cells will get more glucose than they need. Glucose that your cells don't use accumulates as fat. Avoid weight gain while taking insulin Eating healthy foods and being physically active most days of the week can help you prevent unwanted weight gain. The following tips can help you keep the pounds off: Count calories. Eating and drinking fewer calories helps you prevent weight gain. Stock the refrigerator and pantry with fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Plan for every meal to have the right mix of starches, fruits and vegetables, proteins, and fats. Generally, experts recommend that meals consist of half non starchy vegetable, one-quarter protein and one quarter a starch such as rice or a starchy vegetable such as corn or peas. Trim your portion sizes, skip second helpings and drink water instead of high-calorie drinks. Talk to your doctor, nurse or a dietitian about meal-planning strategies and resources. Don't skip meals. Don't try to cut calories by skipping meals. When you skip Continue reading >>

Sticky - Beginner's Guide To Caninsulin (vetsulin) | Feline Diabetes Message Board - Fdmb

Sticky - Beginner's Guide To Caninsulin (vetsulin) | Feline Diabetes Message Board - Fdmb

BEGINNERS GUIDE TO CANINSULIN (VETSULIN) This guide was developed by FDMB members to help you safely manage your cats diabetes using Caninsulin (called Vetsulin in the USA). Finding out that our beloved kitty is diabetic can feel a bit overwhelming at first. But the good news is that, with appropriate care, a diabetic cat can very often live as long and as happily as a non-diabetic cat. And some cats will go into remission from their diabetes, and be able to have their diabetes controlled by diet alone, temporarily or permanently. Right now it may seem that managing Feline Diabetes (FD) is a steep learning curve to master. But be patient. Your confidence in managing your cats diabetes will soon grow. There are three important elements to FD treatment: 2. HOME TESTING OF CAT'S BLOOD GLUCOSE ~ Much easier than it sounds! (See below) A number of different insulins can be prescribed for cats. They work in different ways, but are almost always injected twice a day, every 12 hours. Your vet has prescribed Caninsulin (Vetsulin). Originally developed for dogs, it is also often prescribed for cats. Because of cats faster metabolism, Caninsulin (Vetsulin) may not last in the system a full 12 hours. Typically, it may remain effective for 8 - 12 hours. How long it lasts depends on the individual cat. As we often say, Every Cat Is Different (ECID). Caninsulin (Vetsulin) is s a U40 insulin (40 units of insulin per ml). It is available in cartridges for use with a VetPen, and also in vials for use with syringes. If using syringes ensure that these are also U40. Try to get U40 syringes with half-unit markings. Mixing before use. Caninsulin (Vetsulin) is a suspension and must be mixed before use. Some people invert the vial/cartridge a few times before using; others roll the vial sever Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

Diabetes And Kidney Disease (stages 1-4)

What is diabetes? Diabetes happens when your body does not make enough insulin or cannot use insulin properly. Insulin is a hormone. It controls how much sugar is in your blood. A high level of sugar in your blood can cause problems in many parts of your body, including your heart, kidneys, eyes, and brain. Over time, this can lead to kidney disease and kidney failure. There are two main types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes generally begins when people are young. In this case, the body does not make enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes is usually found in adults over 40, but is becoming more common in younger people. It is usually associated with being overweight and tends to run in families. In type 2 diabetes, the body makes insulin, but cannot use it well. What is chronic kidney disease (CKD)? Your kidneys are important because they keep the rest of your body in balance. They: Remove waste products from the body Balance the body’s fluids Help keep blood pressure under control Keep bones healthy Help make red blood cells. When you have kidney disease, it means that the kidneys have been damaged. Kidneys can get damaged from a disease like diabetes. Once your kidneys are damaged, they cannot filter your blood nor do other jobs as well as they should. When diabetes is not well controlled, the sugar level in your blood goes up. This is called hyperglycemia. Hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) can cause damage to many parts of your body, especially the kidneys, heart, blood vessels, eyes, feet, nerves. Diabetes can harm the kidneys by causing damage to: Blood vessels inside your kidneys. The filtering units of the kidney are filled with tiny blood vessels. Over time, high sugar levels in the blood can cause these vessels to become narrow and clogged. Without enough blood, the kid Continue reading >>

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