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What Is Apidra Insulin Used For?

High-alert Medications - Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

High-alert Medications - Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

The leaflets are FREELY available for download and can be reproduced for free distribution to consumers. Or, if you are a facility or organization, you can order professional pre-printed leaflets shipped directly to you. Extra care is needed because Apidra is a high-alert medicine. High-alert medicines have been proven to be safe and effective. But these medicines can cause serious injury if a mistake happens while taking them. This means that it is very important for you to know about this medicine and take it exactly as directed. Top 10 List of Safety Tips for Apidra When taking your medicine 1. Know your insulin. Apidra is a rapid-acting insulin that should be injected below the skin within 15 minutes before or 20 minutes after starting a meal. Have food ready before injection. After injecting the insulin, do not delay eating or skip a meal. 2. Prepare your insulin. Apidra can be mixed with insulin NPH (intermediate-acting insulin), but always draw Apidra into the syringe first and use immediately after preparing the mixture. Do not mix Apidra with other insulins if using an insulin pen or external pump. Do not vigorously shake insulin before use. 3. Don’t reuse or recycle. Dispose of used syringes/needles, pens, and lancets in a sealable hard plastic or metal container (e.g., empty detergent bottle or sharps container from your pharmacy). When the container is full, seal the lid before placing it in the trash. Do not reuse or recycle syringes/needles or lancets. 4. Don’t share. Even if you change the needle, sharing an insulin pen or syringe may spread diseases carried in the blood, including hepatitis and HIV. To avoid serious side effects 5. Avoid mix-ups. If you use more than one type of insulin, make sure each vial or pen looks different to avoid mix-ups. Fo Continue reading >>

Insulin Glulisine

Insulin Glulisine

Insulin glulisine is a rapid-acting insulin analogue that differs from human insulin in that the amino acid asparagine at position B3 is replaced by lysine and the lysine in position B29 is replaced by glutamic acid.[1] It was developed by Sanofi-Aventis and is sold under the trade name Apidra.[2] When injected subcutaneously, it appears in the blood earlier than human insulin.[3] When used as a meal time insulin, the dose is to be administered within 15 minutes before or 20 minutes after starting a meal.[4] Intravenous injections may also be used for extreme hyperglycemia, but must be performed under the supervision of a medical professional.[5] [edit] External links[edit] Apidra Homepage Continue reading >>

What Is Apidra?

What Is Apidra?

QUICK LINKS Insulin glulisine is a fast-acting type of insulin. Insulin is one of many hormones that help the body turn the food we eat into energy. This is done by using the glucose (sugar) in the blood as quick energy. Also, insulin helps us store energy that we can use later. When you have diabetes mellitus, your body cannot make enough insulin or does not use insulin properly. So, you must take additional insulin to regulate your blood sugar and keep your body healthy. This is very important as too much sugar in the blood can be harmful to your health. Insulin glulisine starts to work faster than some other types of insulin, and its effects do not last as long. It should act more like the insulin your body would normally produce. Because the effects of insulin glulisine are short-acting, your doctor may also prescribe a longer-acting insulin for you to use. This medicine is available only with your doctor's prescription. Find big savings at pharmacies near you with GoodRx discount coupons Lowest GoodRx Price $400.40 View All Prices A nurse or other trained health professional may give you this medicine. You may also be taught how to give your medicine at home. This medicine is given as a shot under your skin or into a vein. Always double-check both the concentration (strength) of your insulin and your dose. Concentration and dose are not the same. The dose is how many units of insulin you will use. The concentration tells how many units of insulin are in each milliliter (mL), such as 100 units/mL (U-100), but this does not mean you will use 100 units at a time. Each package of insulin glulisine contains a patient information leaflet. Read this leaflet carefully and make sure you understand: How to prepare the medicine. How to inject the medicine. How to use disposab Continue reading >>

Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

What is it used for? How does it work? Apidra vials, Apidra SoloStar pre-filled pens and Apidra penfill cartridges (for use with ClikSTAR or Autopen 24 pens) all contain the active ingredient insulin glulisine. They are used to treat diabetes. People with diabetes have a deficiency or absence of a hormone manufactured by the pancreas called insulin. Insulin is the main hormone responsible for the control of sugar (glucose) in the blood. People with type one diabetes need to have injections of insulin to control the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. Insulin injections act as a replacement for natural insulin, and allow people with diabetes to achieve normal blood glucose levels. The insulin works in the same way as natural insulin, by binding to insulin receptors on cells in the body. Insulin causes cells in the liver, muscle and fat tissue to increase their uptake of glucose form the bloodstream. It also decreases the production of glucose by the liver, and has various other effects that lower the amount of glucose in the blood. Apidra contains a type of insulin called insulin glulisine. This is known as a fast-acting insulin. When it is injected under the skin it starts to lower blood sugar within approximately 10 to 20 minutes and its effects last for around three to four hours. This type of insulin should be injected up to 15 minutes before, or if necessary immediately after a meal, to control increasing blood glucose levels after eating. Insulin glulisine is usually given in combination with intermediate or longer-acting types of insulin, which provide control over blood glucose throughout the day. It is important to monitor your blood glucose regularly and adjust your insulin dose as required. Your doctor or diabetic team will explain how to do this. Keeping Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Apidra To Regular Insulin In Hospitalized Patients (apidra)

Comparison Of Apidra To Regular Insulin In Hospitalized Patients (apidra)

The purpose of this study is to compare Apidra (a rapid acting insulin analogue) with Regular insulin (fast acting) in addition to the use of long acting insulin Glargine in hospitalized patients in terms of efficacy and safety in blood glucose control and frequency of low blood glucose. Blood glucose control along with incidence and rate of low blood glucose during the hospitalization shall be of primary interest; length of hospital stay comparing the short acting insulin used shall be the secondary interest. OBJECTIVES: To compare the rapid acting insulin analogue Apidra with regular insulin in addition to insulin Glargine in hospitalized patients in terms of efficacy and safety, namely Glycemic control and frequency of hypoglycemia. Glycemic control, and incidence and rate of hypoglycemia during the hospitalization shall be the primary endpoints; length of hospital stay according to the short acting insulin used shall be the secondary endpoint. RESEARCH DESIGN: Randomized, prospective study. METHODS: Inpatient single center study, planning to enroll 600 patients with type II diabetes admitted to medical or surgical non-ICU service for three days or longer. Subjects will be randomized to Apidra or regular insulin in a 1:1 fashion. Insulin Glargine will be given once a day for basal insulin in all subjects. An algorithm to determine the initial doses of insulin and dose adjustments is as follows: Lean subjects (BMI less than 25 kg/m2) will initially receive a total of 0.4 units/kg/day, overweight subjects (BMI 25-30 kg/m2) 0.5 units/kg/day and obese subjects (BMI greater than 30 kg/m2) 0.6 units/kg/day. Fifty percent of the total amount of insulin will be given as Glargine and 50% as regular insulin or Apidra. Supplemental short-acting insulin will be given for hypergl Continue reading >>

What Is Rapid-acting Insulin?

What Is Rapid-acting Insulin?

Rapid-Acting insulins are insulin analogs that were developed to help imitate meal-induced insulin secretion. Many type 2 diabetes patients will eventually require bolus mealtime insulin to help achieve blood glucose control. Bolus mealtime insulin works quickly to lower the increase in blood sugar after eating. It does this by stimulating the cells in the body to absorb glucose from the bloodstream. They have a quick onset of action (15-20 minutes) and short duration of action (2-4 hours).* Rapid-acting insulin analogs are often used over regular insulin because of their quick onset, which allows patients to inject it closer to mealtime and because of their short duration, which decreases the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). Some of the rapid-acting insulins available in the US include: Apidra (insulin glulisine) is a rapid-acting insulin analog used in the treatment of type 2 diabetes.Apidra is given as a subcutaneous (under the skin) injection within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal, but always consult with your healthcare provider on proper use. It can be injected in the abdomen, thigh, or shoulder. Injection sites should be rotated each time to prevent the risk of lipodystrophy, an accumulation of fatty tissue under the skin at the site where insulin is injected. Your healthcare provider will help determine your proper dose based on each individual’s specific needs and lifestyle. Apidra’s onset of action is 25 minutes and its effect lasts about 4-5 hours. Apidra can also be used in an insulin pump.1 People who are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra (insulin glulisine) should not take it. Always check with your healthcare professional about any potential drug interactions before starting treatment. Apidra is available Continue reading >>

Apidra

Apidra

NOTICE: This Consumer Medicine Information (CMI) is intended for persons living in Australia. (a-pid-ra) What is in this leaflet It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor, pharmacist or diabetes educator. All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you using Apidra against the benefits they expect it will have for you. If you have any concerns about using this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. What Apidra is used for Apidra is used to reduce high blood sugar (glucose) levels in people with diabetes mellitus. Apidra is a modified insulin that is very similar to human insulin. It is a substitute for the insulin produced by the pancreas. Apidra is a short-acting insulin. Your doctor may tell you to use a long-acting insulin in combination with Apidra. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Apidra has been prescribed for you. Before you use Apidra When you must not use Apidra Some of the symptoms of an allergic reaction may include: If you have a lot of hypos discuss appropriate treatment with your doctor. After the expiry date printed on the pack or if the packaging is torn or shows signs of tampering. If you use Apidra after the expiry date has passed, it may not work as well. If it has expired or is damaged, return it to your pharmacist for disposal. If the product appears cloudy, discoloured or contains particles, or if the injection pen, cartridge or vial appears damaged. If you are not sure whether you should start using this medicine, talk to your doctor. There is no experience with the use of Apidra in children less than 4 years. Before you start to use Apidra Tell your doctor if you have allergies to any other medicines, foods, preservatives or dyes. Te Continue reading >>

Apidra | Diabetes In Pets | Fandom Powered By Wikia

Apidra | Diabetes In Pets | Fandom Powered By Wikia

The alterations to the human insulin molecule that produces insulin Glulisine are all to the B insulin chain; position B-#3, which is normally amino acid asparagine is replaced with lysine and the lysine amino acid which is normally found at position B-#29 is replaced by glutamic acid [4] . Making substitutions at these positions on the B insulin chain, inhibits hexamer formation [5] . Since insulin in hexamer form must break down into dimers and monomers to become active, inhibiting the molecule's natural tendency to form hexamers by self-association, means better, faster absorption , more rapid onset , peak and shorter duration . Apidra [6] may be diluted for all uses except in insulin pumps. It may be mixed in the same syringe with NPH / isophane insulin only. Alterations to human insulin producing insulin glulisine (Apidra). There is no clinical data regarding same syringe mixing of Apidra and any other insulin preparations in humans, but testing conducted in dogs indicates a slower onset when mixed with NPH / isophane insulin. Used on its own, Apidra displayed an earlier onset with them [7] . Antibody formation in the dog was noted. Dr. Nelson of University of California-Davis said in his lecture at the Ohio State Endocrinology Symposium in 2006 that if the short-acting analog insulins have any role in feline and canine diabetes, it is not yet determined [8] . Continue reading >>

Different Insulins Are Designed For Different Needs.

Different Insulins Are Designed For Different Needs.

Prescription Apidra® is for adults with type 2 diabetes or adults and children (4 years and older) with type 1 diabetes to improve blood sugar control. Apidra® given by subcutaneous injection is usually used with a longer-acting insulin. When used as a mealtime insulin, Apidra® should be given within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal. Apidra® may be infused subcutaneously by external insulin infusion pumps. Do not use Apidra® during a low blood sugar reaction (hypoglycemia) or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra®. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Apidra®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Apidra® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Apidra®, when given by injection under the skin, should not be mixed with insulins other than NPH. Do not mix Apidra® with any insulin when used in the pump or for intravenous administration. The most common side effect of insulin, including Apidra®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include low blood potassium, injection site reactions, such as changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, such as itching and rash. Less common, but potentially more serious or life-threatening, is generalized allergy to in Continue reading >>

Test Driving Insulin

Test Driving Insulin

How many insulins have you tried? If you're like most people, you only switch to something new when a better generation comes out, such as when Regular upgraded to Humalog or when NPH upgraded to Lantus. But when it comes to comparing insulin in the same family, say Humalog versus Novolog or Lantus versus Levemir, most of us only try something new when something goes very wrong, such as burning at the injection site. Yech... But what really differentiates them anyway? On the outside, there aren't many distinct differences between Humalog, Novolog and Apidra. They are all rapid-acting insulin designed to enhance upon the classic Regular. They have a quick onset (between 10 and 15 minutes) and are generally are out of your system in a couple of hours. But if you ask an individual, "Which insulin do you use?" you'll get a variety of answers and a variety of reasons. When Apidra came to market in 2004, it claimed the title of speed champion. While Humalog was fast, and Novolog was faster, Apidra was the fastest, according to manufacturer Sanofi-Aventis. Actually, there is no scientific evidence that there are any major difference between the different brands of rapid-acting insulin. "I have seen zero reliable research (ie, not conducted by an insulin company) showing any difference in action times," says expert John Walsh, PA, CDE, and author of Pumping Insulin. But many people — including many Apidra users like myself! — still claim otherwise. We surveyed the folks at TuDiabetes to get their impressions of how the different insulins have affected their blood sugar, and several people responded with interesting feedback about the new kid on the block, Apidra. Linzie, a type 1, switched to Apidra when she went on her insulin pump. "Apidra works really quick compared to t Continue reading >>

Apidra Side Effects Center

Apidra Side Effects Center

Apidra (insulin glulisine [rdna origin] inj) is a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat diabetes in adults and children who are at least 4 years old. Apidra is usually given together with a long-acting insulin. Common side effects of Apidra include: injection site reactions (pain, redness, or irritation). Apidra can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Tell your doctor if you experience symptoms of low blood sugar including sudden sweating, shaking (tremor), fast heartbeat, hunger, blurred vision, dizziness, tingling hands/feet, headache, nausea, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Tell your doctor if you have serious side effects of Apidra including: signs of low potassium level in the blood (such as muscle cramps, weakness, irregular heartbeat). The dosage of Apidra is individualized. Blood glucose monitoring is essential. The total daily insulin requirement may vary and is usually between 0.5 to 1 Unit/kg/day. Apidra may interact with albuterol, clonidine, guanethidine, lanreotide, niacin, octreotide pramlintide, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of Apidra on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Apidra. If you are planning pregnancy, discuss a plan for managing your blood sugars with your doctor before you become pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Consult your doctor before breastfeeding. Our Apidra (insulin glulisine [rdna origin] inj) Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information o Continue reading >>

Insulin Glulisine (rx)

Insulin Glulisine (rx)

Diabetes Mellitus Type I or II Indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus Dosing considerations Equipotent to regular human insulin (ie, elicits same glucose lowering effects on unit per unit basis) when administered IV Insulin glulisine has a more rapid onset of action and a shorter duration of action than regular human insulin Dosage must be individualized; blood glucose monitoring is essential in all patients receiving insulin therapy Total daily insulin requirement may vary and is usually between 0.5-1 unit/kg/day Insulin requirements may be altered during stress, major illness, or with changes in exercise, meal patterns, or coadministered drugs SC injection Administer within 15 minutes before a meal or within 20 minutes after starting a meal When administered by SC injection, insulin glulisine should generally be used in regimens with an intermediate- or long-acting insulin Administered by SC injection in the abdominal wall, thigh, or upper arm Injection sites should be rotated within the same region (abdomen, thigh or upper arm) from one injection to the next to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy Continuous SC injection (insulin pump) May be administered by continuous SC infusion in the abdominal wall Do not dilute or mix with any other insulin Infusion sites should be rotated within the same region to reduce the risk of lipodystrophy Insulin in the reservoir must be changed at least q48hr Do not expose to temeratures >98.6 F (37 C) Initial programming of the external insulin infusion pump should be based on the total daily insulin dose of the previous regimen Malfunction of the insulin pump or infusion set, or handling errors or insulin degradation can rapidly lead to hyperglycemia, ketosis and diabetic ketoacidosis See pres Continue reading >>

Apidra U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Apidra U-100 Insulin Subcutaneous : Uses, Side Effects, Interactions, Pictures, Warnings & Dosing - Webmd

Insulin glulisine is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes . Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke . Insulin glulisine is a man-made product that is similar to human insulin . It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. Insulin glulisine starts working faster and lasts for a shorter time than regular insulin. It works by helping blood sugar ( glucose ) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin . Insulin glulisine should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin ( lipodystrophy ). Insulin glulisine may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. The insulin container you are currently using can be kept at room temperature (see also Storage section). Inject this medication under the skin as directed by Continue reading >>

Apidra (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Inj) Patient Information: Side Effects And Drug Images At Rxlist

Apidra (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Inj) Patient Information: Side Effects And Drug Images At Rxlist

What is insulin glulisine (Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, Apidra SoloStar Pen)? Insulin glulisine is a hormone that is produced in the body. It works by lowering levels of glucose (sugar) in the blood. Insulin glulisine is a faster-acting form of insulin than regular human insulin. Insulin glulisine is used to treat diabetes in adults and children who are at least 4 years old. It is usually given together with a long-acting insulin. Insulin glulisine may also be used for other purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of insulin glulisine (Apidra, Apidra OptiClik Cartridge, Apidra SoloStar Pen)? Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of insulin allergy: itching skin rash over the entire body, wheezing, trouble breathing, fast heart rate, sweating, or feeling like you might pass out. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is the most common side effect of insulin glulisine. Symptoms of low blood sugar may include headache, nausea, hunger, confusion, drowsiness, weakness, dizziness, blurred vision, fast heartbeat, sweating, tremor, trouble concentrating, confusion, or seizure (convulsions). Watch for signs of low blood sugar. Carry a piece of non-dietetic hard candy or glucose tablets with you in case you have low blood sugar. Insulin glulisine can also cause hypokalemia (low potassium levels in the blood). Call your doctor at once if you have symptoms such as dry mouth, increased thirst, increased urination, uneven heartbeats, muscle pain or weakness, leg pain or discomfort, or confusion. Tell your doctor if you have itching, swelling, redness, or thickening of the skin where you inject insulin glulisine. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about si Continue reading >>

Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

Apidra (insulin Glulisine)

Apidra is the brand name for human analog insulin glulisine. It is used to help treat diabetes by lowering levels of glucose in the blood. It can be used by both adults and children over four years old, with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. Apidra is one of the insulins in the fast-acting class (also called rapid-acting). This means that the onset of Apidra is about 15 minutes from the time you take it. By contrast, insulins from the short-acting class take effect within 30 to 60 minutes. Long-acting insulins take two to four hours to begin working. Apidra was developed by Sanofi-Aventis, who also produces the most popular type of long-acting insulin, Lantus. The two (Apidra and Lantus) can be taken in conjunction, and in fact, you should be on a longer-acting insulin if you’re taking Apidra for mealtimes. Apidra will only work for two to four hours total, so you need another type of insulin to cover you between mealtimes and overnight. How Do I Take Apidra? Apidra is available in several ways. You can inject it with a needle subcutaneously, you can put it in an insulin infusion pump, you can get it in pen form, and it can also be administered via an IV, if you’re in the hospital. If you’re using the pre-filled pens, it’s important to note that your pens should be kept refrigerated until you’re ready to start using one. Once you start using a pen, it’s good for 28 days unrefrigerated, but only if it’s kept at a room temperature no warmer than 77 degrees Fahrenheit. When Should I Take Apidra? Apidra is known as a mealtime insulin and was designed to only be taken when you’re eating, in order to manage mealtime spikes as well as to correct high blood sugar in people with type 1 diabetes or those who have been instructed to do so. It’s been approved to be injec Continue reading >>

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