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What Is An Insulin Pump And How Is It Used?

Insulin Pump Overview

Insulin Pump Overview

As people with diabetes know, keeping blood sugar levels in a safe range is extremely important. Good blood sugar control not only makes you feel well, but also helps prevent long-term diabetes complications, such as blindness, kidney failure and heart disease. People with type 1 diabetes don’t produce insulin, a hormone that helps the body use sugar (glucose), a key source of energy that comes from carbohydrates. If you have type 1 diabetes you must make up for the lack of insulin with insulin therapy. Meanwhile, people with type 2 diabetes produce insulin, but their bodies don’t use insulin properly, or they don’t produce enough insulin. Diet, exercise and medication can often work to control glucose levels. However, in certain cases, these measures aren’t enough, and insulin therapy is needed to better control blood sugar levels. While insulin can be given by self-injection, people who take multiple daily injections of insulinmay also consider using an insulin pump. An insulin pump provides continuous delivery of short acting insulin all day long. The insulin pump substitutes the need for long acting insulin. A pump also replaces the need for multiple daily injections with a continuous insulin infusion, and also helps to improve your blood sugar levels. How Do Insulin Pumps Work? Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that mimic the way the human pancreas works by delivering small doses of short acting insulin continuously (basal rate). The device also is used to deliver variable amounts of insulin when a meal is eaten (bolus). The basal insulin rates are usually set up in your pump with your doctor, and you can have one or multiple basal settings programmed in your pump, based on your needs. You program the amount of insulin for your mealtime bolus di Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Not Just for Type 1 An estimated 350,000 people in the United States use insulin pumps today, and about 30,000 of those are believed to have Type 2 diabetes. Surprised? Type 2 diabetes is a progressive disease that causes many people who have it to eventually need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels. Although many people still think insulin pumps are only for treatment of Type 1 diabetes, they can also be useful for some people with Type 2 diabetes. According to Charles H. Raine III, MD, a diabetologist in Orangeburg, South Carolina, who himself has Type 2 diabetes and uses an insulin pump, the criteria for a good pump candidate are the same, no matter what type of diabetes a person has. In general, a good pump candidate has uncontrolled blood glucose, but also has a desire to try for better control of his diabetes, is willing to measure and document food intake and blood glucose levels, and is physically, emotionally, and cognitively able to manage a pump (or has a caregiver who is). Another important characteristic is a willingness to keep appointments with members of his diabetes care team. Insulin pumps are cell-phone-size devices used to deliver preprogrammed and user-adjusted doses of insulin. Depending on the brand and model, they hold between 180 and 315 units of insulin. Most people use rapid-acting insulin — options include insulin lispro (brand name Humalog), insulin aspart (NovoLog), and insulin glulisine (Apidra) — in their pumps, with a few using Regular. Instead of using an intermediate- or long-acting insulin as a background — or basal — insulin, a user simulates the pancreas’s steady release of insulin by programming the pump to automatically give small amounts of the rapid-acting or Regular insulin around the clock, based on Continue reading >>

How Pumping Works

How Pumping Works

An insulin pump is a device about the size of a cell phone that contains a cartridge of rapid-acting insulin. A pump has a screen and buttons for programming the pump’s internal computer, and a precise motor that pushes the insulin from the cartridge into your body through a thin plastic tube called an infusion set. How is insulin delivered? Like your pancreas, an insulin pump releases small amounts of rapid-acting insulin to keep blood glucose levels steady between meals and during sleep. This is called the basal rate. Basal insulin takes the place of long-acting insulin. Then, at meal or snack time, you can tell the pump to deliver the amount of insulin needed to match the grams of carbohydrate in the food that is eaten, just like a healthy pancreas. This is called a bolus. A bolus can also be given to correct a high blood glucose. How is an insulin pump connected to my body? Every 2-3 days, a thin plastic tube called a cannula is inserted just underneath the skin using an infusion set. The infusion set is typically an all-in-one set that uses a thin introducer needle to insert the soft, thin cannula, which is then removed once the cannula is under the skin. A tube connects the infusion set to the pump using a Luer connector, a standard locking mechanism that securely attaches the tube to the pump.. Your healthcare professional will help you determine the best insulin infusion site for you. Typical infusion sites include the abdomen, hips, buttocks, upper back arm, and thighs. How is an insulin pump worn? Most pumps are so small and discreet, no one has to know you're wearing one unless you want them to. Plus, there are so many accessories available, you have many options to choose from. And for pumps that share information and communicate wirelessly using a meter-r Continue reading >>

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Convenient Diabetes Care: The Insulin Pump

Insulin pumps are small, computerized devices that some people with diabetes use to help manage their blood sugar. They wear their pump on their belt or put it in their pocket. The pump releases rapid-acting insulin into your body through a small, flexible tube (called a catheter) which goes under your belly's skin and is taped in place. The insulin pump works nonstop, according to a programmed plan unique to each pump wearer. You can change the amount of insulin delivered. Between meals and overnights, the pump constantly delivers a small amount of insulin to keep your blood sugar in the target range. This is called the "basal rate." When you eat food, you can program extra insulin -- a "bolus dose" -- into the pump. You can calculate how much of a bolus you need based on the grams of carbohydrates you eat or drink. When you use an insulin pump, you must check your blood sugar level at least four times a day. You set the doses of your insulin and make adjustments to the dose depending on your food and exercise. Some doctors prefer the insulin pump because it releases insulin slowly, like how a normal pancreas works. Another advantage of the insulin pump is that you don't have to measure insulin into a syringe. Research is mixed on whether the pump provides better blood sugar control than more than one daily injection. An insulin pump is a small computerized device that delivers insulin into the body. This is different from injecting insulin throughout the day using insulin syringes and needles. Insulin pumps can be programmed to deliver very precise amounts of insulin in a continuous (basal) dose and in carefully planned extra (bolus) doses delivered at specific times throughout the day, usually when eating. Some pumps, like the one in this picture, connect to the body Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everything You Need To Know About Insulin Pumps

Everyone needs insulin to live. Insulin is a hormone that helps our bodies use and store the food we eat. People with Type 1 Diabetes no longer make insulin and have to give insulin in order to sustain life. People with Type 2 Diabetes don’t use their own insulin well, and over time can have trouble making enough. So, all people with Type 1 diabetes and some people with Type 2 diabetes need insulin. When people give insulin injections, they may take 1-2 injections of a long acting insulin every day and 3+ injections of rapid acting insulin for meals and snacks. The typical person with Type 1 Diabetes could take anywhere from 4-7+ injections a day. Many people currently give insulin through an insulin pen or a syringe. But, there is another option, an insulin pump. An insulin pump delivers rapid acting insulin in two ways. First, the pump is programmed to give you insulin every hour throughout the hour referred to basal insulin. Basal, think “base,” is the insulin your body needs even in the absence of food, it is also referred to as background insulin. This basal rate replaces the long acting injection that you take. Second, is bolus, this is the insulin you take for food or to correct a high blood sugar. If you get basal and bolus confused, think “bowl”, as in you eat out of a bowl, to help you remember bolus is for food. Once you are on a pump, all insulin is delivered through the pump and shots are no longer necessary. Components There are a few things necessary to make a pump work. When a pump is shipped to someone: they will also need to send infusion sets, reservoirs, and possibly batteries, depending on your pump. Let’s talk about each component. Infusion Sets An infusion set is the part that is actually inserted into the body and has tubing that conn Continue reading >>

How Best To Use An Insulin Pump?

How Best To Use An Insulin Pump?

My aunt and I both have diabetes, but we have different opinions about using an insulin pump. She says the pump delivers insulin all day and night according to the basal and bolus insulin you program into the pump. I was taught that basal insulin is delivered only for the times and amounts set, and that you should set the bolus for the carbohydrate grams eaten. Which way is correct? Pam Sargent, Kennebunkport, Maine Janis McWilliams, RN, MSN, CDE, BC-ADM, responds: An insulin pump, a small device attached to your body either with an infusion set or adhesive (for a patch pump), delivers insulin continually, much as a working pancreas does. This continual delivery is called the basal rate and is programmed into the device. Usually, some insulin is delivered every hour, but it can be set to zero or suspended for a period of time The bolus dose is additional insulin that you ask the pump to deliver, usually before a meal, to account for the food to be eaten. This mimics how a normal pancreas produces more insulin in response to rising blood glucose during a meal. The bolus dose is usually based on the carbohydrate grams you plan to eat; type your carb count into the pump and, for most pumps, a bolus calculator figures out how much insulin you should take. The settings for the basal rate and insulin-to-carbohydrate ratios for mealtime boluses should be programmed with the help of a knowledgeable health care professional. Insulin pumps offer advanced features. Multiple basal rates can be programmed for different situations, such as weekends or the menstrual cycle. A temporary basal rate, to increase or decrease insulin by a certain percentage for a set amount of time, may be helpful on sick days or highly active days. Pump features also provide different ways to give boluses Continue reading >>

The T:slim X2 Pump Is Up To 38% Smaller Than Other Pumps,1 But Is Packed With Big Features.

The T:slim X2 Pump Is Up To 38% Smaller Than Other Pumps,1 But Is Packed With Big Features.

*A prescription and additional training may be required to access certain future software updates. Offer only available to customers in the United States. 38% smaller than MiniMed 630G and 670G and at least 28% smaller than MiniMed 530G, Animas Vibe and Omnipod System. Data on file, Tandem Diabetes Care. Additional feature updates are not currently available for the t:slim X2 Pump with Dexcom G5 CGM integration and are subject to future FDA approvals. Charges may apply. Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM sold separately. CGM coverage may vary based on insurance. Please consult your CGM supplier for coverage information. Tested to a depth of 3 feet for 30 minutes (IPX7). CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration; may result in hypoglycemia if calibration not performed, when taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings. The Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM transmitter can only be paired with one medical device (either a Dexcom receiver or t:slim X2 Pump) and one consumer device (phone or tablet) at the same time. dQ&A USA Diabetes Connections Surveys, 2009-2017. Dexcom G5 Mobile CGM User Guide, 2017. Following your shared data requires the Dexcom Follow app. dQ&A USA Diabetes Connections Surveys, 2013-2017. Indications for Use: RX ONLY. The t:slim X2 Insulin Delivery System is intended for the subcutaneous delivery of insulin, at set and variable rates, for the management of diabetes mellitus in persons requiring insulin for individuals 6 years of age or greater. The t:slim X2 Insulin Pump can be used solely for continuous insulin delivery and/or as part of the t:slim X2 System to receive and display continuous glucose measurements from the Dexcom G5 Mobile Sensor and Transmitter. The t:slim X2 System also includes continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Insulin pumps are an increasingly common treatment for type 1 diabetes. They can improve glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes but do not suit everyone. An insulin pump delivers insulin every few minutes in tiny amounts, 24 hours a day. It is usually about the size of a deck of cards, but can be much smaller. The insulin flows through a cannula which sits in the subcutaneous tissue (where you inject) and is changed by the pump user every few days. Basal (background) insulin is programmed to meet the pump user’s needs. The bolus insulin is delivered at the touch of a button to cover food or bring down a high blood glucose level. Only rapid-acting insulin is needed and provides all your insulin requirements. Insulin pumps reduce the need for multiple injections and give the user the ability to make smaller, more accurate adjustments to insulin delivery. Note: insulin pumps do not measure blood glucose levels, but some pumps can read the signal from a separate glucose sensor. What sort of insulin pumps are there? There are a number of different types of insulin pump and accessories. They vary in aspects such as weight; units of adjustment; whether they have tubing or not and battery life. A ‘tethered’ pump uses a fine tube to connect the pump to the cannula; the pump is worn in a pocket or clipped to a belt. A patch pump or micro pump has no tubing or a very short tube, and the pump is usually stuck on to the skin. The following suppliers currently offer pumps in the UK: Animas Advanced Therapeutics Cellnovo Medtronic Roche OmniPod A good document for comparison can be downloaded here. Type 1 Technology guide We have produced a family-friendly guide to type 1 diabetes technology, which highlights recommendations from NICE on treatments and technology for chi Continue reading >>

What Is An Insulin Pump

What Is An Insulin Pump

Insulin pumps are the size of a pager and fit in your pocket. Most pumps are "worn" on a belt, carried in a pocket, or attached by a holster and connected by thin plastic tubing to the infusion set. An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that is programmed to deliver insulin into the fatty tissue under the skin. The insulin pump is durable and lasts for years, but the insulin supply and certain pump components (insulin reservoir, tubing and infusion set) are changed every few days. What are the basic components of an insulin pump? The pump: Most insulin pumps are about the size of a pager, and contain a reservoir of insulin, the pumping mechanism, battery, computer chip and screen. They are outside of the body, so they are called external pumps. Most pumps are “worn” on a belt, carried in a pocket, or attached by a holster and connected by thin plastic tubing to the infusion set. Infusion set: The infusion set is the “connector” that allows insulin to flow from the pump into the skin. It is attached to the skin with a strong adhesive. On the under side of the infusion set, there is a short, fine cannula, or tube, that passes through the skin and rests in the subcutaneous fatty tissue. Tubing: The tubing brings insulin from the pump (insulin reservoir) to the infusion set. Self-assessment Quiz Self assessment quizzes are available for topics covered in this website. To find out how much you have learned about Insulin Pumps, take our self assessment quiz when you have completed this section. The quiz is multiple choice. Please choose the single best answer to each question. At the end of the quiz, your score will display. If your score is over 70% correct, you are doing very well. If your score is less than 70%, you can return to this section and review t Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small battery-operated electronic device that holds a reservoir of insulin. It is about the size of a mobile phone and is worn 24 hours a day. The pump is programmed to deliver insulin into the body through thin plastic tubing known as the infusion set or giving set. The pump is worn outside the body, in a pouch or on your belt. The infusion set has a fine needle or flexible cannula that is inserted just below the skin where it stays in place for two to three days. Only fast acting insulin is used in the pump. Whenever food is eaten the pump is programmed to deliver a surge of insulin into the body similar to the way the pancreas does in people without diabetes. Between meals a small and steady rate of insulin is delivered. The insulin pump is not suitable for everyone. If you’re considering using one, you must discuss it first with your doctor or Credentialled Diabetes Educator. How does it help me manage my diabetes? Research has shown that insulin pump therapy can reduce the frequency of severe hypoglycaemia as well as improve quality of life. Using a pump may also improve suboptimal blood glucose control. It is important that you have realistic expectations about pump therapy. It is not a cure for people who require insulin to manage their diabetes but a way of delivering insulin that may offer increased flexibility, improved glucose levels and improved quality of life. Pump therapy requires motivation, regular blood glucose checking, the ability to learn pump technology and the willingness to keep in regular contact with your diabetes educator or endocrinologist for review and adjustment of pump rates. Resources - Blog post- What I've Learned From 12 Years Pumping What insulin pumps are available to me? You can see av Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

Insulin Pump For Diabetes

How does an insulin pump work? The typical insulin pump is attached to a thin plastic tube (an infusion set) that has a soft cannula (or plastic needle) at the end through which insulin passes. This cannula is inserted under the skin, usually on the abdomen. The cannula is changed every two days. The tubing can be disconnected from the pump while showering or swimming. The pump is used for continuous insulin delivery, 24 hours a day. The amount of insulin is programmed and is administered at a constant rate (basal rate). Often, the amount of insulin needed over the course of 24 hours varies depending on factors like exercise, activity level, and sleep. The insulin pump allows the user to program many different basal rates to allow for variation in lifestyle. In addition, the user can program the pump to deliver a bolus (large dose of insulin) during meals to cover the excess demands of carbohydrate ingestion. How common is an insulin pump? Hundreds of thousands of people with diabetes worldwide are using an insulin pump. Although insulin pumps were first used by people with type 1 diabetes, people with type 2 diabetes sometime use them as well. Many children successfully use insulin pumps. Insulin pumps allow for tight blood sugar control and lifestyle flexibility while minimizing the effects of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Newer models of the pump have been developed that do not require a tubing, in fact - the insulin delivery device is placed directly on the skin and any adjustments needed for insulin delivery are made through a PDA like device that must be kept within a 6 foot range of the insulin delivery device, and can be worn in a pocket, kept in a purse, or on a tabletop when working. Probably the most exciting innovation in pump technology is the ability to Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin Pump Therapy

Insulin pump therapy can give you the better control you want for your lifestyle.1, 2 Technology for Joy & Jake What Is Insulin Pump Therapy? An insulin pump is a small device about the size of a small cell phone that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. It delivers precise doses of rapid-acting insulin to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small amounts of insulin delivered continuously (24/7) for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can deliver “on demand” to match the food you are going to eat or to correct a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are determined by your healthcare professional. Buttons to program your insulin LCD screen to show what you are programming Battery compartment to hold 1 AAA alkaline battery Reservoir compartment that holds insulin A plastic cartridge that holds the insulin that is locked into the insulin pump. It comes with a transfer guard (blue piece at the top that is removed before inserting the reservoir into the pump) that assists with pulling the insulin from a vial into the reservoir. A reservoir can hold up to 300 units of insulin and is changed every two to three days. An infusion set includes a thin tube that goes from the reservoir to the infusion site on your body. The cannula is inserted with a small needle that is removed after it is in place. It goes into sites (areas) on your body similar to where you give insulin injections. The infusion set is changed every two to three days. An infusion set is placed into the insertion device and wi Continue reading >>

Using An Insulin Pump

Using An Insulin Pump

NovoLog® has been proven safe and effective for use in insulin pumps in children ages 2 and older with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 1 diabetes use an insulin pump. What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small, programmable, battery-operated device that delivers a steady, measured amount of insulin under your skin. You and your diabetes care team can program your insulin pump to deliver NovoLog® in constant “basal” doses throughout the day and “bolus” doses at mealtime. Insulin pumps may be helpful for people with diabetes who have more than one insulin injection per day, including some people with type 2 diabetes. Pumps provide continuous insulin delivery in small doses, similar to the way the pancreas naturally releases basal insulin. You push a button to release mealtime doses of insulin to cover food. They allow people with diabetes to take their insulin automatically, wherever they happen to be. Benefits of NovoLog® in an insulin pump NovoLog® is a fast-acting insulin that can be used for up to 6 days in a pump before it needs to be changed. The table below shows how often to change NovoLog® in a pump. Please be sure to check the instructions that came with your pump. Pump component Time frame before changing NovoLog® in reservoir Up to 6 days Infusion set and infusion set insertion site Up to 3 days NovoLog® in the pump should be discarded after exposure to temperatures that exceed 98.6ºF. Low rate of clogs in an insulin pump In a clinical study, NovoLog® was found to have a low rate of clogs when used in pumps. That's good news if you are already using, or thinking about using, an insulin pump. NovoLog® remains heat stable in pumps at normal body temperature (up to 98.6°F). This makes N Continue reading >>

To Pump, Or Not To Pump?

To Pump, Or Not To Pump?

Your 10-year-old daughter just returned from diabetes camp. She said that everyone was using an insulin pump, and she wants one too. You are worried about having a tiny computer deliver insulin into her body. Should you ask your daughter’s health-care team about pumps? Your three-year-old son is a very picky eater and you are having a very hard time controlling his blood glucose levels, even with multiple injections every day. You have heard about insulin pumps, but is he too young for one? Your teenager has been using a pump for about three years. She is now on the cheerleading team and she does not like being connected to the pump because of how it looks on her clothes. Should she switch back to injections? These are all common scenarios for parents of children or teens with diabetes. If you’re facing a decision about whether your child should use a pump, this article may help by explaining some of the advantages and challenges of insulin pump therapy for children and teens. Pump basics An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that is programmed to continuously deliver basal, or background, insulin and that also allows bolus doses of insulin to be delivered to cover meals and snacks. The pumps currently on the market are about the size of a cell phone. An insulin pump is worn outside the body; no surgery is necessary for insulin pump therapy. Instead, an infusion set is used to connect the pump to the body. An infusion set consists of a small plastic cannula, or catheter, that is connected to a length of plastic tubing, which transports insulin from the pump reservoir to the body. The cannula is inserted into the fatty tissue just under the skin with a small needle, either manually or with an insertion device. The needle is removed after the cannula is inse Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

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