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What Is A High Insulin Level

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

Five Stages Of Diabetes: Pick Up High Insulin And Blood Sugar Levels Early

FIVE STAGES OF DIABETES: BLOOD SUGAR LEVELS & INSULIN DYSFUNCTION Did you know there are 5 stages of blood sugar and insulin dysfunction leading to full blown diabetes, Most, walk around without knowing their blood sugar levels are high. Upon the diagnosis of diabetes there is a typical sense of shock or disbelief, yet at the same time it represents an estimated 13 year losing battle for the pancreas as food choice triggers excess insulin release and the pancreas loses function. Prevention and intervention should focus on stage 1, the earliest point of dysfunction which is insulin resistance. Unfortunately because clinicians focus on blood sugar and not insulin as a standard test, years are lost and treatment typically begins at stage 3 when high blood sugar levels are present. The Stages of Diabetes Stage 1, insulin resistance: Blood sugar levels seem normal because the pancreas balances high blood sugar by releasing higher amounts of insulin. Stage 2, blood sugar levels rise (pre-diabetes): The pancreas has difficulty keeping up with the demand of producing more insulin to maintain normal levels of blood sugar. The pancreas becomes fatigued from overworking and it puts out less insulin, blood sugar levels begin to rise. Stage 3, high blood sugar levels (diabetes): Damage to the pancreas begins, insulin output cannot cover the rise in blood sugar levels rise more quickly. Stage 4, damage to the pancreas (diabetes): An elevation in blood sugar level is the result of years of the pancreas overworking. The pancreas works excessively to lower blood sugar. Stage 5, Failed pancreas (diabetes): The pancreas produces too little insulin, or none . Need insulin injections to survive. Early DETECTION: Before Blood Sugar Levels Rise There may not be any symptoms, or symptoms may n Continue reading >>

High Insulin Levels Could Lead To Obesity

High Insulin Levels Could Lead To Obesity

An unexpected discovery has shown that certain widespread beliefs about healthy eating habits may be false, and actually causing people to put on weight. The finding came from a researcher at the University of British Columbia and was published in Cell Metabolism. The study set out to observe the role of insulin, which is hormone that permits the body to store blood sugar so that it can be used as energy later on. A lack of insulin causes diabetes, and, according to a different study in the same journal, impaired brain insulin action may be the cause of the unrestrained lipolysis which results in, and worsens, type 2 diabetes. After analyzing the role of insulin in animals, James Johnson, an associate professor or cellular and physiological sciences, discovered that too much insulin may be detrimental. Johnson split mice into two groups and provided both with a high-fat diet. One group, the control group, consisted of normal mice and the other consisted of mice which were bred to have only half the regular amount of insulin. Results showed that the normal mice became overweight, just as the scientist anticipated. However, the mice that had low levels of insulin did not gain weight due to the fact that their fat cells burned more energy while storing less. The mice that remained skinny had less swelling and had livers that were in better health. This meant, according to Johnson, that obesity resulted from the additional insulin that was made in the normal mice by the high-fat diet. In other words, mice, as well as humans, may produce more insulin than necessary. The research indicates that people can maintain a healthy weight by constantly bringing the levels of insulin back to a healthy minimum. This can be done by increasing the time between meals and eliminating snack Continue reading >>

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

Insulin

Insulin

Insulin is an anabolic hormone that promotes glucose uptake, glycogenesis, lipogenesis, and protein synthesis of skeletal muscle and fat tissue through the tyrosine kinase receptor pathway. In addition, insulin is the most important factor in the regulation of plasma glucose homeostasis, as it counteracts glucagon and other catabolic hormones—epinephrine, glucocorticoid, and growth hormone. Table 1. Reference Range of Insulin Levels [1] (Open Table in a new window) Insulin Level Insulin Level (SI Units*) Fasting < 25 mIU/L < 174 pmol/L 30 minutes after glucose administration 30-230 mIU/L 208-1597 pmol/L 1 hour after glucose administration 18-276 mIU/L 125-1917 pmol/L 2 hour after glucose administration 16-166 mIU/L 111-1153 pmol/L ≥3 hours after glucose administration < 25 mIU/L < 174 pmol/L *SI unit: conversional units x 6.945 Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Tweet Insulin resistance is the name given to when cells of the body don’t respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin resistance is the driving factor that leads to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes and prediabetes. Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity; however, it is possible to be insulin resistant without being overweight or obese. Modern research has shown that insulin resistance can be combatted by treatment methods that reduce how much insulin the body is producing or taking via insulin injections or insulin pumps. Reducing insulin resistance can be achieved by following low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. What is insulin resistance? The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. [282] It also means that glucose is more likely to build up in the blood and this can lead to too high blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it tries to cope by producing more insulin. People with insulin resistance are often producing too more insulin than healthy people. Producing too much insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Symptoms of insulin resistance Initially, insulin resistance presents no symptoms. The symptoms only start to appear once it leads to secondary effects such as higher blood sugar levels. When this happens, the symptoms may include: Lethargy (tiredness) Hunger Difficulty concentrating (brain fog) Other signs that often appear in people with insulin resistance include: Weight gain around the middle (belly fat) High blood pressure High cholesterol levels If insulin resistance develops into prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the symptoms will include increased blood glucose levels and more of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Causes of insulin r Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

12 Signs Of Insulin Resistance

12 Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Most people think about diabetics when they see the word insulin, but problems with insulin can occur in a number of different conditions, in people with normal blood sugar. You have probably heard of insulin resistance; it is a significant health problem because it’s associated with an increased risk of obesity, heart attacks, polycystic ovarian syndrome, cancer and other serious conditions. People with insulin resistance usually have excessively high levels of this hormone, because it doesn’t work properly. We are seeing an increasing number of patients who have been diagnosed with insulin resistance by their own doctor, yet they don’t fully understand what this term means. How would you know if your insulin level is too high? There is a blood test that can measure your fasting insulin, but it isn’t always reliable and many doctors are not willing to order this test. This is a shame because elevated insulin is bad for your health and shortens your lifespan. Insulin has many important roles in your body. People with too much insulin in their bloodstream are said to have insulin resistance, syndrome X, metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes. They are all interchangeable terms. Due to modern diets and lifestyles, nearly everybody produces more insulin in their pancreas than they should. This is a problem because if blood insulin levels have been high for years, the cells of your body start to ignore it. The insulin becomes less and less effective at its important job in your body (getting glucose inside your cells so you can burn it for energy). Knowing whether or not you have too high insulin is important because it can allow you to make some changes and avoid some serious health problems in the future. Luckily there are several tell tale signs or clues that your bo Continue reading >>

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

Insulin Causes Weight Gain – Hormonal Obesity Iv

In our previous post, we were reviewing the link between insulin and obesity. It appears that insulin is not merely associated with obesity but causes obesity. Click here for Hormonal Obesity Part I, Part II, and Part III. For decades we believed the Caloric Reduction as Primary (CRaP) hypothesis of obesity that turned out to be as useful as a half-built bridge. Study after study showed that reducing calories did NOT lead to weight loss. Patient after patient tried to lose weight by restricting calories with consistent failure. But we couldn’t abandon the calorie model so what was left to do? Blame the patient, of course! Since patients were not losing weight, there was only 2 possibilities. Either the advice to eat a low fat, calorie restricted diet and exercise more was wrong or the patient was not following this advice. So the doctors and dieticians berated, ridiculed, belittled, rebuked, chided and reprimanded. We said – Eat less, Move more – as if that would cure their problems. After all, the food pyramid couldn’t be wrong, could it? But the excess weight was still as persistent as a nagging tooth. Doctors, of course, were drawn to this CRaP hypothesis as bathers to a seashore. Obesity was now not our failure to understand it, but their lack of willpower and/or laziness (gluttony or sloth). It was our favourite game – blame the patient. But, of course, the problem was the CRaP hypothesis. It was just wrong. Increased calories did not cause obesity so reducing calories didn’t cause weight loss. Exercise didn’t work either, as we will see in a future series. So, what was the real aetiology of obesity? Insulin. What happens when we give high doses of insulin to patients? Insulin makes you gain weight. The more insulin you take, the more weight you gain. Continue reading >>

Does High Fat Dairy Raise Insulin Levels?

Does High Fat Dairy Raise Insulin Levels?

High insulin levels are usually the result of an excessive carbohydrate intake from pasta, breads, sweetened beverages or desserts. The glycemic index of foods, which measures their ability to raise your blood sugar levels, is usually proportional to their insulin index, or their ability to make your pancreas secrete insulin. Although the glycemic index of dairy products is low compared to other carbohydrate-containing foods, it has a disproportionately high insulin index, according to a study published in 2005 in the "British Journal of Nutrition." The protein content of dairy, more than its fat content, seems to influence how much your insulin levels will raise after eating. Whole Milk Vs. Skim Milk In a controlled study, researchers gave volunteers either a glass of skim milk or whole milk on different occasions and measured the increase in their blood sugar and blood insulin levels, as published in 2005 in the "British Journal of Nutrition." The results show that both skim and full-fat milk elicited similar responses in the blood sugar and insulin levels of healthy participants. Although a glass of milk, independently of its fat content, contains an average of 12 grams of carbohydrates, while a slice of white bread has about 15 grams of carbohydrates, the insulin index of skim and full-fat milk is just as high as that of white bread. Milk Protein Researchers studying the high insulin index of milk believe that the types of protein found in milk, either casein, whey or both, stimulate the production of insulin from the pancreas. The protein content of both skim and full-fat milk is similar, which explains why they both have the same ability to raise your insulin levels. Although more studies are needed, this theory suggests that other protein-containing dairy product Continue reading >>

What Happens When A Person's Insulin Level Is High?

What Happens When A Person's Insulin Level Is High?

Insulin, a hormone secreted by your pancreas, helps control the amount of glucose in your blood. Glucose, also called sugar, is your body's main source of energy. The food you eat is converted to glucose and then driven into your body's cells where it can be used as fuel. Insulin plays a major role in this process. Too little or too much insulin affects the amount of glucose available for fuel. Video of the Day Your pancreas releases insulin in response to elevated levels of glucose in your blood. Once insulin reaches the blood, it performs a number of functions, one of which is to facilitate the movement of glucose into muscle cells and fat. There, it is used as energy. It also stimulates the storage of excess glucose as glycogen in muscles and in the liver. Insulin also stops your liver's production of glucose, which is a process called gluconeogenesis, which serves as an important source of energy when you fast. When your insulin level is too high, your blood glucose level may drop to a dangerously low level--a state called hypoglycemia. This is the most important consequence of too much insulin. The American Diabetes Association defines hypoglycemia as a glucose reading less than or equal to 70 mg/dL. Hypoglycemia occurs as a result of insulin increasing the uptake of glucose by your body's cells, blocking gluconeogenesis and increasing the storage of glucose in the liver and muscle. However, if you don't have diabetes and your pancreas functions as it should, it will release a hormone called glucagon to counteract the effects of insulin. Hypoglycemia is an acute complication of diabetes. It may be mild, moderate or severe. Symptoms include fatigue, weakness, confusion, headache, irritability, personality changes, shakiness, dizziness, trouble concentrating, slurred Continue reading >>

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Blood Levels Of Insulin And Hemoglobin A1c In Foundation Members

Life Extension® has an advantage in identifying modern causes of premature aging and death. That’s because we have direct access to tens of thousands of our members’ blood test results. Our review of this real-world data enables us to uncover disease risk factors that are overlooked by the mainstream media. We then alert members about simple steps they can take to mitigate these hazards. Earlier this year, we analyzed fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c blood levels in over 10,000 members. A startling 66% had higher than desired fasting insulin. Twenty-two percent had hemoglobin A1c levels that placed them in a pre-diabetic state. Hemoglobin A1c measures the percentage of glycated hemoglobin in one’s blood. Hemoglobin A1c levels should be below 5.6%,1 yet more than one in five people we tested had a reading over 6%. Gaining early access to this kind of data can spare aging humans the ravages of degenerative illness. Armed with this knowledge, Foundation members can slash their risk of cancer, vascular occlusion, and other complications before frank diabetes is diagnosed. This article will describe the dangers of elevated fasting insulin and hemoglobin A1c, our recent analysis of member blood tests, and a novel way to protect against glycemic overload. What Is Insulin Supposed to Do? Insulin is a hormone that regulates carbohydrate and fat metabolism.2 Insulin enables liver and muscle cells to take up blood sugar (glucose) for energy production or storage.2 Insulin also facilitates the packing of glucose into fat cells as triglycerides.2 A burst of insulin is released in response to food ingestion. Once glucose has been safely shuttled into energy producing cells or stored, insulin levels should drop below 5 µIU/mL.3 Only a tiny amount of residual insulin should b Continue reading >>

C-peptide

C-peptide

A C-peptide test measures the level of this peptide in the blood. It is generally found in amounts equal to insulin because insulin and C-peptide are linked when first made by the pancreas. Insulin helps the body use and control the amount of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin allows glucose to enter body cells where it is used for energy. The level of C-peptide in the blood can show how much insulin is being made by the pancreas . C-peptide does not affect the blood sugar level in the body. A C-peptide test can be done when diabetes has just been found and it is not clear whether type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes is present. A person whose pancreas does not make any insulin (type 1 diabetes) has a low level of insulin and C-peptide. A person with type 2 diabetes can have a normal or high level of C-peptide. A C-peptide test can also help find the cause of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), such as excessive use of medicine to treat diabetes or a noncancerous growth (tumor) in the pancreas (insulinoma). Because man-made (synthetic) insulin does not have C-peptide, a person with a low blood sugar level from taking too much insulin will have a low C-peptide level but a high level of insulin. An insulinoma causes the pancreas to release too much insulin, which causes blood sugar levels to drop (hypoglycemia). A person with an insulinoma will have a high level of C-peptide in the blood when they have a high level of insulin. A C-peptide test is done to: Help tell the difference between type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Find the cause of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Check to see whether a tumor of the pancreas (insulinoma) was completely removed. You may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 hours before having this blood test. Insulin and some oral medicines use Continue reading >>

Hyperinsulinemia

Hyperinsulinemia

Hyperinsulinemia, or hyperinsulinaemia is a condition in which there are excess levels of insulin circulating in the blood relative to the level of glucose. While it is often mistaken for diabetes or hyperglycaemia, hyperinsulinemia can result from a variety of metabolic diseases and conditions. While hyperinsulinemia is often seen in people with early stage type 2 diabetes mellitus, it is not the cause of the condition and is only one symptom of the disease. Type 1 diabetes only occurs when pancreatic beta-cell function is impaired. Hyperinsulinemia can be seen in a variety of conditions including diabetes mellitus type 2, in neonates and in drug induced hyperinsulinemia. It can also occur in congenital hyperinsulism, including nesidioblastosis. Hyperinsulinemia is associated with hypertension, obesity, dyslipidemia, and glucose intolerance.[1] These conditions are collectively known as Metabolic syndrome.[2] This close association between hyperinsulinemia and conditions of metabolic syndrome suggest related or common mechanisms of pathogenicity.[1] Hyperinsulinemia has been shown to "play a role in obese hypertension by increasing renal sodium retention".[1] In type 2 diabetes, the cells of the body become resistant to the effects of insulin as the receptors which bind to the hormone become less sensitive to insulin concentrations resulting in hyperinsulinemia and disturbances in insulin release.[3] With a reduced response to insulin, the beta cells of the pancreas secrete increasing amounts of insulin in response to the continued high blood glucose levels resulting in hyperinsulinemia. In insulin resistant tissues, a threshold concentration of insulin is reached causing the cells to uptake glucose and therefore decreases blood glucose levels. Studies have shown that Continue reading >>

Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

Essential Notes On Blood Sugar And Insulin

You have approximately 5 liters (about 21 cups) of blood traveling around in your blood vessels and heart at any given moment. In these 5 liters of blood, you need only about one teaspoon of sugar for all of your regular activities. If you regularly have more than a teaspoon of sugar floating through your blood vessels, the excess sugar can slow down your circulation, which, over time, can cause all of the problems you would expect to have if you had thick maple syrup clogging up your blood vessels. This is essentially what happens when a person becomes diabetic. In order to keep the amount of sugar floating through your blood vessels at around a teaspoon, your body releases insulin whenever you eat foods that release sugar into your bloodstream. Eating sugary foods, most sweeteners, grains, cookies, pastries, cakes, pasta, and starchy vegetables like potatoes all lead to a release of sugar into your bloodstream. Insulin works by stimulating your cells to sponge up this excess sugar out of your bloodstream. Once inside your cells, sugar is used for energy, with any excess amount being converted to fat tissue. If you regularly eat sugary foods and highly processed carbohydrates, your body will have released so much insulin that it will begin to lose its sensitivity to insulin, which means that your cells won’t receive as strong a signal to sponge up excess sugar out of your blood. This will lead to excess sugar floating around your blood vessels and all the health problems that come with this scenario. Just a few years ago, 110 - 120 mg/dL (6.1 - 6.7 mmol/L) was widely considered the upper range for a normal fasting blood sugar level. Today, a fasting blood sugar level less than 100 mg/dL (5.6 mmol/L) is considered normal, while anything within 100 to 125 mg/dL (5.6 to Continue reading >>

High Insulin Levels In Nondiabetics

High Insulin Levels In Nondiabetics

Many of us think that using insulin before it’s necessary will help to "rest" our beta cells so they’ll last longer. But now comes a research paper showing that excess insulin actually causes diabetes in nondiabetic mice fed a chow diet. The chow diet is the normal diet given to mice unless you want to fatten them up and give them diabetes, in which case you feed them a high-fat, high-carbohydrate diet. The high insulin levels were caused by injecting these normal mice with insulin glargine (Lantus). This injected insulin did not seem to cause hypoglycemia, although the researchers measured only fasting blood glucose (BG) levels and watched for signs of severe hypoglycemia. The injected insulin did cause insulin resistance, as might be expected as it’s common for mammals to develop resistance to hormones whose levels are high. Most of the increased insulin resistance was in the liver. But instead of "resting" the beta cells, it also caused loss of beta cells and hence insulin deficiency. The insulin also caused higher cholesterol levels and fat accumulation in the liver. Although the mice that got the insulin were only slightly fatter than the control mice at some times, their ratio of white fat to body weight was significantly increased. It’s important to understand that these mice were not diabetic; they didn’t need extra insulin in order to keep their BG levels in a normal range. But the chronic elevation in insulin levels made them store more fat and eventually develop type 2 diabetes. It’s also important to understand that these were mice. Humans don’t always respond the same way that mice do, so mouse studies are simply suggestive, no proof of anything. But could this experiment have any relation to the type 2 diabetes epidemic we’re seeing today? Continue reading >>

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