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What Insulin Resistance

What Remedies Exist For Treating Insulin Resistance?

What Remedies Exist For Treating Insulin Resistance?

If you go to a gym you choose a form of exercise that suits your needs and objectives. Basically there are two types: cardio and strength training. Your goal is to lose weight, then cardio is the best choice. How do you do best? In most gyms there are plenty of devices that you can create a program that meets your objectives. Strength training are you doing short exercises that primarily improve your muscle strength. The act is heavier than cardio. When you do cardio prolonged light exercise and therefore you train your endurance. But you are training with cardio not only your stamina, but also burns fat and thus falls off. The devices that you can use to do cardio: bike, cross-trainer, rowing machine,step and treadmill. The key to burning fat is in the heart with which you train. If you follow a heart rate between 55% and 75% of your "maximum heart rate" your body burns the most fat. If your heart rate higher up late, you burn sugar and no fat, because your body then requires a quick fuel. And sugars provide energy faster than fat. So, if you sport to fall, the intensity does not need to be so high off. I know these tips helped you out. I hope you to read over it and would like more. The #1 secret to fat loss is here on my full guide. Continue reading >>

What Are Some Factors Leading To Insulin Resistance?

What Are Some Factors Leading To Insulin Resistance?

Insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas, permits cells to absorb glucose so that it can be utilized as energy. Insulin resistance is a situation in which a given concentration of insulin produces a less-than-expected biological effect. Insulin resistance has also been described as the requirement of 200 or more units of insulin per day to succeed glycemic control and to inhibit ketosis. One in three Americans—half of those age 60 and older— have a silent blood sugar complication known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance raises the risk for prediabetes, type 2 diabetes and a host of additional serious health problems- heart attacks, strokes, and cancer. In insulin resistance, muscle, fat, and liver cells do not react accurately to insulin and thus cannot efficiently absorb glucose from the bloodstream. As a consequence, the body needs higher levels of insulin to maintain glucose enter the cells. Causes Insulin Resistance Excess Weight Physical Inactivity Hypertension Cigarette smoking Prediabetes Age 40–45 years or older Family history of type 2 diabetes Excessive fat stored in the liver and pancreas Arteriosclerosis Hemochromatosis Chronic stress Cushing’s disease Some medications(glucosamine, rifampicin, isoniazid, olanzapine, risperidone, glucocorticoids, progestogens, methadone, many antiretrovirals) Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Insulin Resistance: The Real Reason Why You Aren’t Losing Weight

Many people have weight loss as one of their key resolutions. Sadly, 35 percent of people also give up on that goal before the month even ends. It’s not necessarily lack of time or willpower that causes you to struggle with weight loss year after year. The real reason that you may have struggled to lose weight is insulin resistance, or a condition I call metabolism dysfunction. So you may be thinking, “Why is it so hard for me to lose weight?” I’m doing “everything right,” and yet still weight loss is difficult. Perhaps (like many of my patients) you’re already following a strict diet and working out several times a week, but to no avail. The weight still won’t come off — or, worse, you are gaining weight for seemingly no reason at all! You have become resigned to being overweight. Weight problems aren’t a permanent and immovable fixture for the rest of your life. If you’re finding that weight is easy to gain and hard to lose, it’s not your fault! Weight problems aren’t just about overeating or under exercising — they’re about metabolic changes (The MD Factor Diet, 2015) that are collectively known as insulin resistance. Lab tests conducted in my practice have confirmed that over 89 percent of my patients have this real and often undiagnosed issue. So the good news is that the right combination of diet, exercise, and will to succeed you can reverse your MD factor and finally find success in losing weight and keeping it off for good. In a nutshell, insulin resistance is the inability of your body to properly convert the food that you eat into energy to fuel your cells. People with the MD Factor have difficulty regulating their blood sugar, which is often due to insulin resistance or even diabetes. In both instances, their bodies are unable t Continue reading >>

Diabetes: What Are The Best Ways To Reverse Insulin Resistance?

Diabetes: What Are The Best Ways To Reverse Insulin Resistance?

Insulin resistance is a condition that impairs the ability to efficiently remove and process glucose from the bloodstream. Glucose, or blood sugar, is a vital energy source required by all cells, organs and systems of the body for normal function. The inability to utilize glucose in the blood results in excess levels in the blood, effects metabolism, and significantly increasing the chances of developing type 2 diabetes. How Does Insulin Resistance Happen Much like leptin resistance, insulin resistance occurs when a needed substance is present in the body, but unable to be utilized by the cells of the body. Specifically, the muscles and cells of the body do not respond or recognize the presence of insulin, resulting in decreased amounts of glucose being delivered to the cells. Insulin is a hormone produced in the pancreas and important for glucose regulation and energy production. The body reacts to this decrease in glucose in the cells by sending signals demanding more glucose for energy, As long as the pancreas can produce enough insulin, meeting the demand for increased amounts of glucose, the body appears to functions normally and glucose levels remain at healthy levels. Should the demand for glucose exceed the ability to produce insulin, blood glucose levels increase which increases the health risks associated with this condition. Causes of Insulin Resistance While researchers have yet to determine an exact cause of insulin resistance, they believe it is closely related to being overweight, having excess fat around the waist and physical inactivity. Genetics and heredity also appear to influence who develops insulin resistance. Insulin resistance risk increases with age; affecting 10% of people between the ages of 20 and 40, but nearly 40% of people over the age of Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance - Topic Overview

Insulin Resistance - Topic Overview

Insulin resistance refers to the inability of the body tissues to respond properly to insulin. Insulin lets sugar (glucose) enter body cells, where it is used for energy. Insulin also helps muscles, fat, and liver cells store sugar to be released when it is needed. If the body tissues do not respond properly to insulin, the blood sugar level rises. Insulin resistance causes the pancreas to release too much insulin (hyperinsulinemia). It may also cause the liver to release too much sugar into the blood. Several things may increase insulin resistance, including: Family history. Insulin resistance may run in families. Being overweight. The more a person weighs, the more insulin his or her pancreas makes and the less the person's body cells respond to insulin. People who are overweight mostly in the upper body have greater insulin resistance and have the greatest risk for type 2 diabetes. Lack of exercise. People who get little or no exercise often have much greater insulin resistance than people who exercise on a regular basis. Age. Teens and older adults usually have greater insulin resistance. Teens have greater insulin resistance because of growth hormones. Pregnancy. In the last 3 to 4 months of pregnancy (third trimester), insulin resistance is increased. A woman who did not have diabetes before pregnancy can develop a type called gestational diabetes. Some medicines such glucocorticoids (for example, prednisone) can reduce the body's response to insulin. This information is not intended to replace the advice of a doctor. Healthwise disclaims any liability for the decisions you make based on this information.© 1995-2015 Healthwise, Incorporated. Healthwise, Healthwise for every health decision, and the Healthwise logo are trademarks of Healthwise, Incorporated. Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

By the dLife Editors Cells throughout the body, including muscle and fat cells, need the hormone insulin to turn glucose (a form of sugar) into energy. In healthy people, insulin attaches to cells and “unlocks” them so glucose can get in. The glucose is used for energy or stored for later. But in people with insulin resistance, cells don’t respond properly to insulin—they “resist” it. As a result, cells stay “locked” and glucose builds up in the blood. To bring the glucose level down, the body tells the pancreas to pump out more and more insulin. Over time, people with insulin resistance develop high levels of insulin in their blood. Eventually the beta cells of the pancreas, which produce insulin, begin to wear out. If they can no longer make enough insulin to keep glucose levels in check, the result is prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. History of Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is not new, although media attention to rising rates of obesity and prediabetes has raised awareness of the condition. It was first connected with diabetes in the 1930s by British physician Harold Percival Himsworth. He coined the term “insulin insensitivity” to describe patients who didn’t respond effectively to injected insulin. Himsworth’s work was the first to acknowledge the existence of two distinctly different types of diabetes—now known as type 1 and type 2. Fifty years and much research later, Dr. Gerald Reaven described metabolic syndrome X, now known simply as metabolic syndrome. Many people with this condition have insulin resistance. They may have a large waist, high levels of blood fats known as triglycerides, low HDL (good) cholesterol levels, high blood pressure and/or high glucose levels. Metabolic syndrome raises the risk for type 2 diabetes and c Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

If your doctor has told you that you have this condition, you're probably asking these questions. It means your body can't respond properly to the insulin it makes. Over time, this sends your blood sugar levels up. That can set you up for type 2 diabetes, as well as heart disease, but it doesn't have to. Exercise and a good diet can help you stay healthy. You can't tell that you have insulin resistance by how you feel. You'll need to get a blood test that checks your blood sugar levels. Likewise, you won’t know if you have most of the other conditions that are part of insulin resistance syndrome (high blood pressure, low "good" cholesterol levels, and high triglycerides) without seeing your doctor. If you already have insulin resistance, you can take actions that will help your health. Exercise. Go for at least 30 minutes a day of moderate activity (like brisk walking) 5 or more days a week. If you're not active now, work up to that. Get to a healthy weight. If you're not sure what you should weigh or how to reach a weight loss goal, ask your doctor. You may also want to talk with a nutritionist and a certified personal trainer. Eat a healthy diet. Think fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, fish, legumes, and other lean protein. Some people with insulin resistance may also need to take metformin. Continue reading >>

Is Diabetes Different From Insulin Resistance?

Is Diabetes Different From Insulin Resistance?

My blood sugar remains high (135 or higher) for 12 to 15 hours after I eat. My general practitioner says I have diabetes, but my ob-gyn has diagnosed me with insulin resistance. What is the difference and should these conditions be treated differently? How is it possible that two doctors think I have two different conditions? — Patricia, Florida Insulin resistance is usually found in people who are overweight. The metabolic changes that are brought on by excess weight prevent cells in the liver and muscles from utilizing glucose, despite normal insulin levels in the body. Insulin is the hormone that helps our body metabolize, or burn, glucose. The body in effect becomes "resistant" to insulin. The body's response to this is to produce more insulin. Unlike some diabetics, whose bodies produce insufficient amount of insulin, individuals who have insulin resistance have high levels of insulin early on in the disease. This process is rather complex and genetic susceptibility to diabetes plays a big role, but suffice it to say that long-term insulin resistance eventually leads to diabetes. The goal of treatment is to normalize day-to-day sugar levels. If you are carrying excess weight and your pancreas still produces an adequate amount of insulin, most likely you have some degree of insulin resistance. You will benefit, therefore, from medicines that are considered insulin "sensitizers." These include medications that fall under the classes of drugs known as metformin (Glucophage) and thiazolinediones (two drugs in this class are pioglitazone — Actos — and rosiglitazone — Avandia). They help your liver and muscle cells better utilize glucose. It is possible, however, that additional medicines will be required to manage your diabetes. In this case, medicines that incr Continue reading >>

Nine Things That Improve Insulin Sensitivity: Accelerate Fat Loss & Build Muscle Faster!

Nine Things That Improve Insulin Sensitivity: Accelerate Fat Loss & Build Muscle Faster!

Insulin sensitivity is SO important for fat loss because when you are insulin resistant, the body is much more likely to store the food you eat as fat. Insulin resistance also produces inflammation in the body, causing a whole bunch of health problems that any sane person wouldn’t want to deal with. Besides making it nearly impossible to lose significant amounts of body fat or pack on muscle, poor insulin sensitivity has all of the following negative effects: • It reduces athletic performance. • It inhibits sleep and makes you tired. • It slows recovery from training or injury. • Muscle soreness and pain are more severe. • It leads to diabetes if you don’t fix it. • It raises triglycerides and increases heart disease risk • It leads to a boatload of other health problems—you’ve heard the misery suffered by diabetics (sleep apnea, nerve problems, gut issues, eye and feet problems, and so on). Don’t worry! There are simple everyday things you can do to improve insulin sensitivity and optimize everything about your life. This article will give you a quick run-down on how insulin works and what you can do NOW to improve it. What Insulin Is & Why It Matters Insulin is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas. When you eat a meal, your blood glucose (sugar) rises after you digest the food. Insulin goes into action, binding with your cells in order to store the glucose either in muscle as glycogen (the energy source for the muscle) or as fat. If you are healthy, the body “prefers” to replenish glycogen first, only storing excess glucose as fat if glycogen stores are topped off. When you develop insulin resistance, the cells aren’t readily binding to insulin. The body has to pump out more insulin to get the high blood glucose that’s circulating Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is Insulin Resistance?

Insulin is a hormone produced by the pancreas that helps unlock the body's cells so that sugar (glucose) from the food we eat can be used by the cells for energy. In people with type 2 diabetes, a combination of problems occurs, and scientists aren't really sure which is the chicken and which is the egg. The person's body may not be producing enough insulin to meet their needs, so some glucose can't get into the cells. Glucose remains in the bloodstream, causing high blood glucose levels. In many cases, the person may actually be producing more insulin than one might reasonably expect that person to need to convert the amount of food they've eaten at a meal into energy. Their pancreas is actually working overtime to produce more insulin because the body's cells are resistant to the effects of insulin. Basically the cells, despite the presence of insulin in the bloodstream, don't become unlocked and don't let enough of the glucose in the blood into the cells. Scientists don't know exactly what causes this insulin resistance, and many expect that there are several different defects in the process of unlocking cells that cause insulin resistance. Medications for type 2 diabetes focus on different parts of this insulin-cell interaction to help improve blood glucose control. Some medications stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin. Others improve how the body uses insulin by working on this insulin resistance. Physical activity also seems to improve the body's ability to use insulin by decreasing insulin resistance, which is why activity is so important in diabetes management. Find more information about diabetes in The Joslin Guide to Diabetes available from the Joslin Online Store. Continue reading >>

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

Have you heard but don’t understand what is insulin resistance? Are you gaining weight no matter what you try? Are you pre diabetic or been diagnosed as a diabetic (T1 or T2)? Has your appetite always been out of control? Well watch this fabulous Tedx talk by Dr Sarah Hallberg and see how insulin resistance can be playing a part in all the above conditions. Everyone can benefit from cutting carbs. Not only will it reduce your risk of T2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular risk factors and more importantly, your inflammatory markers are reduced which has huge implications for cancer prevention. Why are the guidelines still recommending for diabetics to consumes carbohydrates when they are intolerant to them? The message for so long has been “eat whatever you want, then medicate for it”. This is such nonsense. None of us should be eating so many carbs, let alone diabetics. We can have the beginnings of insulin resistance for years, even decades, before we are classed as pre diabetic or T2 diabetic. Having such high circulating levels of insulin is the problem. High insulin levels leads to insulin resistance. Our cells start to require more and more insulin to function. Click To Tweet So now you have watched the talk, lets look again at what insulin resistance is. We are all advised to eat far too many carbs, whether it is ‘healthy wholegrain’, sweets, ice cream, ‘natural’ muesli bars, cereals, bread or potatoes. This constant high level of circulating glucose (which all carbs are converted to) requires more and more insulin to push that glucose into your cells as glycogen. We can only store so much glycogen in our body so the remainder is stored as fat. Insulin is our fat storing hormone. Remember that again, insulin is our fat storing hormone. So whilst our b Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone that facilitates the transport of blood sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into cells throughout the body for use as fuel. In response to the normal increase in blood sugar after a meal, the pancreas secretes insulin into the bloodstream. With insulin resistance, the normal amount of insulin secreted is not sufficient to move glucose into the cells – thus the cells are said to be “resistant” to the action of insulin. To compensate, the pancreas secretes insulin in ever-increasing amounts to maintain fairly adequate blood-sugar movement into cells and a normal blood-sugar level. What are some insulin resistance symptoms? There are usually no obvious, outward signs of insulin resistance. However, when you are severely insulin resistant, dark patches of skin called acanthosis nigricans can develop on the back of the neck. Sometimes a dark ring forms around the neck. These dark patches can also occur on the elbows, knees, knuckles and armpits. More importantly, insulin has less visible effects on metabolic reactions throughout the body, including converting calories into fat. Insulin resistance influences the liver enzymes that produce cholesterol and acts on the kidneys (which can contribute to high blood pressure). High insulin levels also have a role in the process that regulates inflammation. In time, insulin resistance can lead to type 2 diabetes, itself a risk factor for heart disease. Insulin resistance can be diagnosed with blood tests that show low levels of HDL cholesterol (the “good” cholesterol), a high triglyceride level, a high fasting insulin level or a high uric acid level. What are the causes of insulin resistance? There are genetic factors that can contribute to the development of insulin resista Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance And Hypoglycemia In Fitness.

Insulin Resistance And Hypoglycemia In Fitness.

How is it that people who are doing what they are “supposed” to be doing –- eating healthy, exercising, maintaining a normal body composition -– still have blood sugar issues? We’ll explore that, and more, in today’s article. If you’ve ever been interested in blood sugar management, insulin resistance, and hypoglycemia, this is one article you’ll want to check out. ++ In a previous article (Trouble losing body fat? Are anemia and low oxygen delivery to blame?) I focused on oxygen, one of the two fuel sources for what is arguably one of the most important components of your cell, the mitochondria. Without oxygen, it is impossible for your cells to work at their full capacity or for you to be healthy. The second source of fuel for the mitochondria -– glucose –- has an equally important role in the function of cells. In this article, I’ll look at glucose and its role in blood sugar. The blood sugar bandwagon With the epidemic of diabetes and metabolic syndrome plaguing the industrial world in recent years, blood sugar and insulin have gotten their fair share of media attention. In fact, blood sugar balance is a major tenet of virtually every diet book from The Zone to The Atkins Diet. And with good reason: imbalanced blood sugar levels are at the crux of many health issues, including being overweight. But there is much more to know about the blood sugar picture. Real people, real issues In our practice, we constantly see people with blood sugar imbalances. But these people are not run-of-the-mill Americans. Not by a long shot. These are health-conscious, educated individuals who do not spend their time eating Twinkies, bingeing at McDonalds and competing in the World’s Laziest Couch Potato competition. Rather, we see people who eat well, exercise re Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: Dealing With The Diagnosis

Insulin Resistance: Dealing With The Diagnosis

When my daughter was a pre-teen, her routine blood glucose test came back a little high. Her pediatrician had her undergo a special test called a fasting blood glucose test, which was followed by a series of other tests. The results prompted her doctor to come back with a chilling diagnosis: insulin resistance. As a pediatric nurse, I was familiar with the topic of diabetes and insulin resistance, but this was a frightening diagnosis. My daughter was very upset, thinking she now had a terrible disease. And both my husband and daughter turned to me for ways to deal with this new diagnosis. What is insulin resistance? It's a condition in which the hormone, insulin, becomes less effective at managing sugar levels in the blood glucose after eating or drinking anything that contains a simple sugar. Insulin is produced by the pancreas and acts to open the doors of the cells, taking glucose out of the bloodstream and putting it into the cells for energy. When cells don't respond enough to insulin, blood glucose levels rise as a result. How serious is insulin resistance? The presence of insulin resistance typically precedes the diagnosis of type 2 diabetes, previously known as adult onset diabetes. When an individual has diabetes, his or her pancreas does not make enough insulin to keep blood sugars level. This is a chronic disease which can result in a number of side effects and disabilities. How do I know if my child has insulin resistance? The signs and symptoms can vary with each person, but some are very noticeable. In my nursing career, I have taken care of children who seem to have a dark ring around their necks that looks like oily dirt. This is not dirt and can't be washed away. It also can occur under the arms or in the groin area. This ring is called acanthosis nigri Continue reading >>

What Causes Insulin Resistance?

What Causes Insulin Resistance?

I became insulin resistant because I thought orange juice and grape juice and breakfast cereals and flavored low-fat yogurt were all healthy foods. I was a sugar eating machine without realizing it thanks to today’s processed foods. I became diabetic. We can make an excellent guess at the cause of insulin resistance because we ran the experiment in the US when fruit juices were invented by the Welch brothers and then we declared fat was bad and carbs were good, so we loaded up the food supply with added sugar to compensate for the fat reduction. Now we have an epidemic. As a society, we are insulin resistant because we are drowning our bodies in blood sugar for most of the day forcing insulin to be pumped out all the time in high doses and sometimes in very large spikes (like for addressing refined carbs). We flock to processed foods that taste good, we add fructose to foods which causes metabolic damage and causes us to eat more sugary foods (because it bypasses certain signalling). This happens because we artificially manipuated our food supply. We went from natural foods to processed foods in a tiny time scale, giving our biology no time to adapt. We fail to educate people that fruit juices are basically drinking sugar, and the dangers of eating processed foods (added fructose, no fiber, etc). To reverse it, stop drowning yourself in sugar, refined carbs so that insulin isn’t required. Move to “real foods”…that grow on trees or in the ground, or otherwise found in nature. I was able to go from very insulin resistant, to having an extremely low (but still normal) fasting insulin, with a very low fasting blood sugar by doing 4 things differently. See Steve Kirsch's answer to Is it possible to treat insulin resistance? for details. Continue reading >>

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