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What Insulin May Be Bought Over The Counter

Relion Insulin And Other Products At Walmart

Relion Insulin And Other Products At Walmart

Having diabetes can be very expensive, which is why the most recent announcement from Walmart will come as welcome news: In an effort to save people with diabetes up to $60 million a year, the retailer has just introduced the low-cost ReliOn Prime meter and test strips to its ReliOn family of products. The meter will cost $16.24, while the strips will cost $9 for a 50-count package, coming out to 18 cents a test. Additional ReliOn products, such as lancets, syringes, and gloves, will see price reductions, while insulin products will be offered at the price of $24.88 a bottle. “We’ve worked closely with our suppliers and found a way to significantly reduce the cost of diabetes products for all of our customers, whether they have insurance or not, so they can better manage their disease,” noted John Agwunobi, MD, president of Walmart US Health and Wellness. For more information, click here. This blog entry was written by Web Editor Diane Fennell. Continue reading >>

Do I Need A Prescription For Insulin?

Do I Need A Prescription For Insulin?

If you are a diabetic you may have heard conflicting information on whether or not you require a prescription to pick up insulin from a pharmacy. When isn’t a prescription required? In Alberta, insulin can be sold to a patient without a prescription. Insulin is in the Schedule 2 drug class. Schedule 2 medications can only be sold in a pharmacy, and they must be kept behind the pharmacy counter. In order to sell a schedule 2 medication, the pharmacist must set up a complete patient profile and ensure the medication is appropriate for the patient. While insulin is considered schedule 2, it is in this schedule in case of emergency. This means that if you are traveling and run out of insulin, or can’t get in to see your doctor, the pharmacist can maintain your current insulin therapy without sending you to a walk in clinic or emergency. The pharmacist must document the sale of the insulin on your profile, along with any information that helped the pharmacist determine the insulin was appropriate. When is a prescription required? The majority of the time (except in the case of an emergency) a pharmacist will not sell insulin without a prescription. The reasons for this are as follows. Your drug plan will not cover the cost of the insulin without a prescription from your doctor. Your doctor, or a pharmacist with additional prescribing rights must originally write a prescription for a particular type of insulin and at a certain dosage. You should have a blood test every 3-6 months in order to determine if the insulin you are using is working as it should be. Following the blood test you should see your doctor to see if any dose adjustments are necessary. Diabetes is a progressive disease and requires ongoing monitoring and medication adjustments to ensure optimal therapy. Continue reading >>

Crossing The Line — Insulin

Crossing The Line — Insulin

Crossing the line separating Indiana and Illinois sometimes means dealing with different laws and customs. Readers are asked to share ideas for this weekly feature. This week: Insulin. Hoosiers with diabetes who don't have regular access to a doctor, or prefer not to visit one, often cross into Illinois to purchase the insulin needed to manage their blood sugar levels. That's because the Indiana General Assembly unanimously voted in 2014 to make Indiana the first (and still the only) state in the country where diabetics must have a prescription for all insulin purchases. The requirement was strongly supported by the Indiana State Medical Association, whose doctors told lawmakers that diabetics who try to manage their condition without proper medical advice often choose the wrong insulin or administer an improper amount. Most newer insulin formulations already are prescription-only. But older versions of the drug, which can be less efficient and effective, are available over-the-counter in Illinois. IMS Health, a national medical consulting firm, estimates that about 15 percent of U.S. insulin purchasers do so without a prescription. Continue reading >>

Insulin Prescription

Insulin Prescription

Tweet Being prescribed with insulin can be daunting following a diabetes diagnosis. There is a lot to learn about what insulin does and you have to make sure you never let your insulin supply run out. This section aims to answer questions on insulin prescriptions. In the UK, there should be no need for people with diabetes to buy insulin. People with type 1 diabetes and insulin-treated type 2 diabetes are prescribed insulin without charge. But you may have to pay for certain insulin-related products, such as insulin pumps, insulin pens and wallets for insulin storage. It is important to ensure your Medical Exemption Certificate is up to date in order to receive your free insulin, and other prescriptions. Common insulin brands include Iletin, Novolin, Humulin, Humalog and Apidra. For more information about insulin types, please see: Types of insulin Why are people with diabetes given insulin on prescription? People with type 1 diabetes are prescribed insulin shortly after their diagnosis. They will need insulin prescriptions for life to keep their blood glucose levels stable. People with type 2 diabetes can require insulin if diet and exercise cannot control their blood sugar levels adequately. However, if good glycemic control can again be achieved, then a patient can come off insulin. You must make sure that you never run out of insulin. When your insulin supply is starting to run out, contact your pharmacy and re-order your prescription. If you cannot find the answers that you need here, please ask a question in the Diabetes Forum. For more information about prescriptions and benefits, see our guide to diabetes prescriptions. Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffect Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Be Bought Otc?

Can Insulin Be Bought Otc?

My father is diabetic he is on type 2 some times he collapse because of the shortage of medication can I buy it over the counter without prescription at the pharmacy in Johannesburg Diabetes expert - 2017/09/12 Hi Insulin is only available on script The information provided does not constitute a diagnosis of your condition. You should consult a medical practitioner or other appropriate health care professional for a physical exmanication, diagnosis and formal advice. Health24 and the expert accept no responsibility or liability for any damage or personal harm you may suffer resulting from making use of this content. Want to comment? Your comment Continue reading >>

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

How To Get Insulin At A Cheaper Price

Insulin can be expensive. If you’re one of the 6 million Americans with diabetes relying on this main-stay treatment, you could be paying out-of-pocket costs anywhere from $120 to $400 per month, according to a 2015 New England Journal of Medicine commentary. Drugs such as Lantus (insulin glargine) and Levemir (insulin detemir) have seen significant cost increases, according to a recent trend report by pharmacy benefit manager Express Scripts. One reason for the high prices is the lack of generic options for insulin. So for now, you’re stuck having to search around to find affordable options. Where do you shop for more affordable insulin? For some people though, high drug costs can mean making difficult financial choices. Our national polls show people might cut back on groceries and paying bills to pay for their medications. To minimize your costs, consider these options: Prescription Assistance Programs If you don’t have health insurance or are without drug coverage, look into applying for a patient assistance program (PAP). Through the nonprofit NeedyMeds, you can find some programs that offer free or low-cost insulin as long as you meet the eligibility requirements. Those are usually based on your insurance status, income, and diagnosis. You might also qualify for a diagnosis-specific program that can help you save on syringes, pumps, and other diabetes supplies. Pharmacists are also a great resource and can help you find a PAP that meets your financial needs. Switch Drugs Another way to save is by asking your doctor whether there’s a lower-priced insulin that’s right for you. While “long-acting” is a more popular type of insulin, it's also more expensive, but that doesn’t necessarily mean it works better. “It’s mostly a marketing ploy,” says M Continue reading >>

What Diabetics Should Know About Over-the-counter Insulin

What Diabetics Should Know About Over-the-counter Insulin

Insulin is a must-have medicine for people who have type 1 diabetes and for some folks with type 2 diabetes. No matter what the reason—a broken or lost bottle or a missed prescription—not having insulin can quickly become a life-threatening situation if you have diabetes. Insulin is more easily accessible than you may think. While most insulin medications require a prescription, older formulations may be available over the counter without a prescription. “There is nothing wrong with these insulins,” Amber L. Champion, MD, director of the Diabetes Center at Mercy Medical Center in Baltimore explained. “They are not harmful, expired, or tainted. They’re just older insulin that was designed in the 1950s.” According to Champion, these standard insulins—Humulin R, Humulin N, and Humulin 50/50—used to be commonly prescribed, but newer, better insulins have been developed since. These older insulins are never her first choice when treating patients, “but in some cases, they’re justified,” she said. Financial Benefits of OTC Insulin Overall, over-the-counter (OTC) medicines are generally cheaper than their prescription counterparts, often significantly. This is no different with insulin. The high price of medicines can cause hardship for people who don’t have insurance or who are underinsured, according to Desmond Schatz, MD, president of the American Diabetes Association and a professor at the University of Florida. “Some of the over-the-counter insulins are only $25 for a vial, compared to over $200 or $300,” he said.” This less expensive option allows people to follow their diabetes treatment plan, reducing the risks of the complications—including death—that can result from untreated or under-treated diabetes. Supervision Still Needed Use Continue reading >>

Over The Counter Insulin: A Safety Net With Sizable Risk

Over The Counter Insulin: A Safety Net With Sizable Risk

Though many physicians consider it a bad idea, it's possible to buy insulin over the counter (OTC), or without a prescription, in all states except Indiana. This less expensive option exists for people caught between a diabetes diagnosis and the difficulty of having inadequate, or no health insurance. The assumption is that individuals exercising the non-prescription option know how to administer the insulin safely. While that does not always turn out to be true, some who purchase OTC insulin consider it a matter of survival. What’s Available The insulins available without a prescription are not generics of up-to-date brand name insulins. They are older, less concentrated formulations: R, or Regular insulin which is short-acting, and N insulin, an intermediate-acting version that is taken twice daily. No long-acting OTC insulin is available for people requiring basal doses. The FDA points out that these older insulin formulas were approved for OTC sale since they “did not require a licensed medical practitioner’s supervision for safe use.” Their availability is intended to increase patient safety by making insulin obtainable “quickly in urgent situations, without delays.” Risks However, professionals caution that no one should self-administer any type of insulin unless they have consulted with a physician, for two reasons: An incorrect administration (e.g., wrong dosing, poor timing) may lead to erratic glucose levels, and potentially fatal high or low blood sugar episodes. The level of daily glucose control people obtain using OTC insulin is questionable. Though the drug quality is high, it takes longer to metabolize in the body than newer versions. This means users of R and N insulins need to maintain stability in their diet and daily activities—somethin Continue reading >>

Insulin Over The Counter: Available, But Risky

Insulin Over The Counter: Available, But Risky

People with Type 1 diabetes and some of those with Type 2 must have insulin to properly process their food, avoid diabetic complications, and in many cases, stay alive. Typically, managing the disease involves interacting with one's doctor or other healthcare advisor and getting a prescription for the drug. But what if someone loses their insurance or can't afford the copays, etc.? Well, many folks don't know it, but it's possible to buy insulin (and needles and syringes) without a prescription over the counter, or OTC, much as one might buy ibuprofen or aspirin (although you still would have to get it from the pharmacy). So that would be a good thing, right? Maybe not. A story that aired on NPR radio recently described the situation of one woman with diabetes who had no insurance, and no physician to advise her. Although she was able to obtain the OTC insulin, it didn't really solve all her problems for several reasons. Importantly, the OTC insulin that's available is an older formulation (circa 1980s) that isn't the same as those that are prescription varieties today. Some of the newer types are long-acting, some may not be activated immediately upon injection, and some may act immediately but only for a short time. So any instructions she may have been given when she did see a physician might not be appropriate for these old forms. For example, she tried to "guesstimate" the proper dose and timing based on the earlier instructions and ran into trouble, ending up in the emergency room more than once. If a person uses too much insulin, they run the risk of dangerously-low blood sugar; if they use too little their blood sugar won't be well controlled, and the likelihood of diabetic complications such as blindness and kidney failure increases. So one must monitor blood s Continue reading >>

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

You Can Buy Insulin Without A Prescription, But Should You?

As anyone with diabetes can tell you, managing the disease with insulin usually means regular checkups at the doctor's office to fine-tune the dosage, monitor blood-sugar levels and check for complications. But here's a little known fact: Some forms of insulin can be bought without a prescription. Carmen Smith did that for six years when she didn't have health insurance and didn't have a primary care doctor. She bought her insulin without a prescription at Wal-Mart. "It's not like we go in our trench coat and a top hat, saying, 'Uh I need the insulin,' " says Smith, who lives in Cleveland. "The clerks usually don't know it's a big secret. They'll just go, 'Do we sell over-the-counter insulin?' " Once the pharmacist says yes, the clerk just goes to get it, Smith says. "And you purchase it and go about your business." But it's still a pretty uncommon purchase. Smith didn't learn from a doctor that she could buy insulin that way. In fact, many doctors don't know it's possible. When she no longer had insurance to help pay for doctors' appointments or medicine, Smith happened to ask at Wal-Mart if she could get vials of the medicine without a prescription. To figure out the dose, she just used the same amount a doctor had given her years before. It was a way to survive, she says, but no way to live. It was horrible when she didn't get the size of the dose or the timing quite right. "It's a quick high and then, it's a down," Smith says. "The down part is, you feel icky. You feel lifeless. You feel pain. And the cramps are so intense — till you can't walk, you can't sit, you can't stand." Smith says her guesswork put her in the emergency room a handful of times over the years. The availability of insulin over the counter presents a real conundrum. As Smith's experience shows Continue reading >>

Novolin R: Solution For Injection (100u)

Novolin R: Solution For Injection (100u)

Brand 100% *Brand contains same active ingredient but may not represent FDA-approved generic equivalent 100U Ingredients Close All Sections Reported Side Effects for Novolin R 100units/ml Solution for Injection Close *This is an approximate aggregated range of reported side effects from clinical studies performed on this drug. Your experience with this drug may be different. Close Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Class B - Animal studies have revealed no evidence of harm to the fetus, however, there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women. OR Animal studies have shown an adverse effect, but adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women have failed to demonstrate a risk to the fetus in any trimester. Continue reading >>

You Can Buy Otc Insulin, But Should You?

You Can Buy Otc Insulin, But Should You?

Few patients with diabetes are aware that some forms of insulin can be purchased without a prescription. Many doctors are also not aware of this. The two types of OTC human insulin are made by Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk. They are older versions and take longer to metabolize than prescription versions. Few patients with diabetes are aware that some forms of insulin can be purchased without a prescription. Many doctors are also not aware of this. The two types of OTC human insulin are made by Eli Lilly and Novo Nordisk. They are older versions and take longer to metabolize than prescription versions. FDA says the availability lets patients gain access to the drug "quickly in urgent situations, without delays." IMS Health reports that about 15% of people with diabetes who buy insulin make OTC purchases. The availability of OTC insulin presents a difficult issue, however. It could save the lives of patients who lack insurance or regular access to a doctor, or who otherwise do not have insulin when they need it. But use of insulin can carry major risks if patients do not get the dose or timing right. Taking the wrong dose consistently can lead to high blood pressure, kidney disease, nerve damage, loss of eyesight, or stroke. Continue reading >>

Wal-mart Pharmacist Doesn't Care If Customer Dies

Wal-mart Pharmacist Doesn't Care If Customer Dies

Well let me explain my situation. Im a 32 year old male Type 1 Diabetic, and I've not had any kind of health insurance for about a year and a half now so naturally, i can't afford my insulin so I'm forced to take an, "over the counter" insulin for the past year now, and its seems to do ok for me, and gets the job done. Well, I learned a while back that Walmart actually sells my OTC insulin way cheaper than any other pharmacy around (literally half the price) so I've been going to Walmart pharmacies for my insulin for quite a while now. Well, sunday morning i realized that my vial was almost empty, so naturally, i knew i had to get up to Walmart to get my insulin at some point in the day before 6:00PM because thats when they close on Sundays. I showed up at Walmart at 5:45 and as i was walking thru the store, nearing the pharmacy, i noticed that the shudders/gates had already been pulled down and the pharmacy was closed early. Well, i walked up the the shudders and could plainly see a pharmacy employee standing inside, well, just standing there doing nothing. So i said "Sir, i don't know why you're closed early today, but i really need my insulin" seeing as I'm a diabetic, there really is no way around it, i HAVE to have it. He just said "sorry, we're closed" and i said "well sir, i know your business hours, and its not 6PM yet, so please just give me a vial of my insulin, this is basically considered a life or death situation to say the least" and while I'm saying this, he just shuts all the lights out in the back, as if this makes him just disappear, like he thought then i couldn't see him, when i could still see him plain as day standing there, and he just ignored me! So then i say "sir, the insulin i need isn't even a prescription grade insulin, all you have to do is Continue reading >>

Why Is Some Insulin Available Over The Counter?

Why Is Some Insulin Available Over The Counter?

To answer this, we walk you through the history of drug regulation in the U.S. There’s been a resurgence of interest in non-prescription insulin, no doubt a result of the high prices for the most widely dispensed-by-prescription branded analogs and a political climate that’s breeding uncertainty over the continued availability of insurance for people with diabetes. People have been turning to old-line products, such as Lilly Humulin and Novo-Nordisk Novolin, and Walmart’s store-branded ReliOn products, or at least researching whether such lower-cost brands are an option. sponsor Why is a prescription for Novo Novolin, one of the products supplied under the ReliOn brand at Wal-Mart, available just for the asking if Novo’s Novolog is not? To begin to understand why and why not, it’s useful to look at how the federal and state public health agencies have historically approached drug safety and effectiveness. Read more: Why Walmart insulin isn’t the answer. Federal Regulation The insulin varieties that are available today can trace their lineages back to the days before there was a U.S. Food and Drug Administration, and before many states had pure food and drug laws, professional pharmacists’ codes, or regulations restricting distribution of medicinal products. Pretty much all that was required in the 1930’s to lawfully manufacture insulin for sale was the right to do so under the Banting patent and a manufacturing facility meeting the U.S. Agriculture Department’s standards for cleanliness. In the beginning, there was one U.S. patent holder — Eli Lilly — and one Lilly plant in Indianapolis extracting insulin from material shipped from slaughterhouses. As long as those responsible for mixing the batches took proper steps not to let impurities in and th Continue reading >>

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Insulin For Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Examples The different types of insulin are categorized according to how fast they start to work (onset) and how long they continue to work (duration). The types now available include rapid-, short-, intermediate-, and long-acting insulin. Rapid-acting Generic Name Brand Name insulin aspart NovoLog insulin glulisine Apidra insulin human (inhalation powder) Afrezza insulin lispro Humalog Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Mixtures Generic Name Brand Name 70% NPH and 30% regular Humulin 70/30, Novolin 70/30 50% lispro protamine and 50% lispro Humalog Mix 50/50 75% lispro protamine and 25% lispro Humalog Mix 75/25 70% aspart protamine and 30% aspart NovoLog Mix 70/30 50% NPH and 50% regular Humulin 50/50 Packaging Injectable insulin is packaged in small glass vials (bottles) and cartridges that hold more than one dose and are sealed with rubber lids. The cartridges are used in pen-shaped devices called insulin pens. Inhaled insulin is a powder that is packaged in a cartridge. Cartridges hold certain dosages of insulin, and more than one cartridge might be needed to take enough insulin. How insulin is taken Insulin usually is given as an injection into the tissues under the skin (subcutaneous). It can also be given through an insulin pump, an insulin pen, or jet injector, a device that sprays the medicine into the skin. Some insulins can be given through a vein (only in a hospital). Powdered insulin is packaged in a cartridge, which fits into an inhaler. Using the inhaler, a person breathes in to take the insulin. How It Works Insulin lets sugar (glucose) in the blood enter cells, where it is used for energy. Without insulin, the blood sugar level rises above what is safe for the body. If the cells don't get sugar to use for energy, they try to use other nutrients Continue reading >>

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