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What Insulin Comes In A Pen

Vetpen® Is The First And Only Insulin Pen Designed Exclusively For Diabetic Pets.

Vetpen® Is The First And Only Insulin Pen Designed Exclusively For Diabetic Pets.

Go to site For Pet Owners For years, insulin pens have made it easier for human diabetics to manage their diabetes. VetPen allows pet owners to enjoy the same convenience and accuracy when managing their pet’s diabetes. Designed specifically for use with Vetsulin®, VetPen makes giving insulin injections to pets more convenient and more accurate than using vials and syringes. Enables pets to receive more accurate doses consistently. Precision instrumentation allows the same dose to be easily set by simply turning a dial, minimizing the chance for dosing errors Great for small doses—VetPen enables precise doses to be selected down to 0.5 units Even when doses were drawn up by trained laboratory technicians, syringes were found to deliver at least 20% to 25% more insulin than needed for a 1-unit dose11 Provides greater convenience. Ergonomically designed for easy handling, even for owners with visual or manual dexterity issues Multi-dose insulin cartridges require fewer steps to prepare doses once primed (air removed) Portability allows owners to give their pets injections anywhere (refrigeration of cartridges is recommended during storage and usage) 97% of pet owners reported that VetPen was easy to use overall and they had no difficulty learning how to use VetPen3 Helps make insulin injections more comfortable. Less intimidating in appearance, VetPen may help alleviate the fears and concerns owners may have using insulin syringes Minimizes pet discomfort thanks to specially lubricated and triple-sharpened needles that lessen the penetration force 42% of VetPen users with diabetic cats reported that their pets' response to injections improved when injections were given using VetPen instead of syringes3 Available in 2 sizes. 8 IU VetPen with dosing increments of 0.5 I Continue reading >>

Using Insulin Pens And Pen Needles

Using Insulin Pens And Pen Needles

How Do I Use Them? “My Doctor Says I Should Begin Using an Insulin Pen...†BD Getting Started™ An insulin pen is a convenient way to give yourself an insulin shot or injection. It looks like a large fountain pen and comes in two basic types: disposable and reusable. Disposable pens come already filled with insulin. When a pen is empty or expired, it is simply discarded. Reuseable pens have a replaceable cartridge of insulin. The cartridge is replaced when the insulin is used or expired. Whichever type of pen you use, you will need to attach a new pen needle onto the pen with each injection and remove it after every use. The pen may be kept in your pocket or purse at room temperature while in use. The insulin should not get warm or be exposed to direct sunlight. Store unused insulin pen cartridges and pre- filled pens in the refrigerator. Note: Pens from different manufacturers operate differently. Check pen manufacturer’s guidelines for operating instructions and insulin expiration details. Parts of a Pen Needle Each pen needle has an outer shield, an inner shield, and a colored peel tab. Insulin Pens – easy to carry, dose and use How to attach the needle to a pen 1. Remove the colored peel tab from the outer shield. 2. Push the needle straight onto the pen and twist until it is tight. 3. Pull off the outer shield and set it aside. You will need it later to remove the needle from the pen. 4. Pull off the inner shield and prime your pen before injecting. Always prime your insulin pen before each injection Always refer to the instructions of the pen manufacturer when preparing your pen for use. Dial two units on your pen and then press the button to shoot some insulin into the air to make sure it works. This is called an “air shot†Continue reading >>

Learning About Insulin Pens

Learning About Insulin Pens

What is an insulin pen? An insulin pen is a device for giving insulin shots. It looks like a pen. Inside the pen is a needle and a cartridge filled with insulin. You can set the dose of insulin with a dial on the outside of the pen. You use the pen to give the insulin shot (injection). Both disposable and reusable insulin pens are available. With a disposable pen, a set amount of insulin comes in the pen ready to use. When the insulin is used up, you throw the pen away. You use a new pen the next time you need insulin. With a reusable pen, you don't throw the pen away. Instead, you reload the pen with a pre-measured cartridge of insulin. When the insulin is used up, you insert a new cartridge into the pen. Disposable and reusable pens both need a new needle with each shot. The needles come in different lengths and widths. Shorter needles will prevent injecting into the muscle, especially in children or people who are lean. Thinner-width needles reduce the pricking sensation. Width is measured by gauge. The higher the number, the thinner the needle. Why do some people prefer pens? Most people find that insulin pens are easier to use than a bottle and syringe. Many people feel less pain (or no pain) with the smaller insulin pen needle, compared to a syringe needle. Insulin pens may help you give yourself more accurate doses. When you draw insulin into a syringe, you must carefully measure so that you don't get too much or too little. But with a pen, you set a dial for the amount of insulin you want, and then you push the button. Insulin pens may work better than syringes for people who don't see well or who have problems like arthritis that make it harder to use a syringe. Using an insulin pen draws less attention from others. You can give yourself insulin with fewer peop Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Common Insulin Pen Errors: Diabetes Questions & Answers

Q. I recently switched from using syringes to inject insulin to using an insulin pen, and it seems like I need to inject more insulin with the pen to counter the same blood glucose level. The length of the needle seems to be the same, the pen is primed, and yet the pen injection has less of a blood-glucose-lowering effect. What could be going on here? A. The insulin contained in vials and pens is identical. So if you’re using your pen correctly, there should be no change in the effectiveness of the insulin on your blood glucose levels. It’s not unusual for people to be educated on how to use an insulin pen and to believe they are injecting with proper technique but to make one or more minor mistakes that affect the amount of insulin being injected. I recommend that you make an appointment with your diabetes educator or health-care provider and have that person observe you injecting a dose of insulin to see what, if anything, might be going wrong. Here are a few examples of common errors that can occur when administering insulin with a pen: A person may dial in the correct dose, put the needle into the skin correctly, but instead of pushing the button at the end of the pen to inject the insulin, dial the dose back to zero. This would result in no insulin being injected. Once the dose is dialed, the button has to be pushed in all the way — you should hear a series of clicks as you push — and then the pen must be held against the skin, needle inserted, for 6–10 seconds. Some people know that they need to push the button to deliver the insulin, but they don’t push it hard enough to inject the entire dose. Another common mistake is to fail to leave the needle in place for at least 6 seconds after pushing the button on the pen. If the needle is removed too soon, t Continue reading >>

Practical Aspects Of Insulin Pen Devices

Practical Aspects Of Insulin Pen Devices

Go to: Introduction Numerous studies have shown that insulin pen devices have several advantages over the traditional vial-and-syringe method of insulin delivery, including improved patient satisfaction and adherence, greater ease of use, and superior dosing accuracy.1–7 Despite these advantages, the use of insulin pen devices in the United States remains low compared with other developed countries.8 About two-thirds of insulin prescriptions in Europe and about three-quarters in Japan are for pen devices.9 In contrast, in the United States, only 15% of patients are thought to use insulin pens.10 Possible reasons for the low adoption rates in the United States include lack of awareness among health care providers of the advantages of pens compared with the vial and syringe.8,11 An additional issue is the greater prescription cost of insulin cartridges and prefilled insulin pens compared with insulin vials, although the cost to the patient may be the same depending on their coverage; in fact, if they have one copay per box of pens, the cost to the patient may actually be less per unit of insulin. It should be noted, however, that despite the higher unit cost of insulin in pen devices versus vials, several studies have found that overall diabetes-related treatment costs are lower with pen devices than with vial and syringe.1,2,12 In addition, most pen devices have good formulary coverage. For example, the FlexPen® prefilled pen is covered on more than 90% of managed care plans.13 Therefore, in theory, costs should not prevent the use of these devices.14 However, many smaller health maintenance organizations and state Medicaid plans may require prior authorization for insulin pens. Given the clinical, practical, and potential health economic advantages of insulin pens, t Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin Pen Safety

Insulin pens have become a popular way for diabetics to give themselves insulin. Insulin pens are available for multiple insulin types. However, as with any technology, pens can be misused leading to medication errors and inaccurate administration of insulin. Although an insulin pen is easy to use, certain precautions must be taken to assure proper use. Below is a list of safety tips to keep in mind when using an insulin pen: 1. Do not share your insulin pen with anyone: Insulin pens should never be used for more than one person. Using insulin pens on more than one person puts people at risk for infection with blood-borne pathogens such as hepatitis viruses and HIV, which causes AIDS, the agency warns. Infection can occur even if an insulin pen's needle is changed. We are aware of this happening in hospitals, where, for example, a nurse may not realize the risk. Pen needles are changed in between patients but the very same pen is used for multiple patients! This is dangerous because even if the needle is changed, it's still possible for insulin in the pen to become contaminated. Then, when subsequent patients are injected, there's a danger of passing along harmful bacterial or virus. 2. Do not withdraw insulin from an insulin pen cartridge Using insulin pens as "mini" insulin vials, by drawing up insulin into an insulin syringe, can lead to inaccurate dose measurement the next time the insulin pen is used for dose delivery. The reason for this is related to air entering the pen unintentionally, interfering with the proper mechanics of the pen. 3. Do not leave an open needle attached to an insulin pen Leaving an insulin needle attached to an insulin pen can lead to unintentional air entering into the insulin pen. If unintentional air enters into the insulin pen, it can c Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

Tweet Insulin pens are common in the United Kingdom, and are generally characterised by a different shape and the fact that they use an insulin cartridge as opposed to a vial. Some insulin pens use replaceable cartridges, and others use non-replaceable cartridges and must be disposed of after being used. Most insulin pens use replaceable insulin pen needles, which have become extremely short and thin. The replaceable cartridges for insulin pens come in 3 and 1 ½ ml sizes, although 3 is more common and has become dominant. Prefilled insulin pens are disposed of when the insulin within the cartridge is used up. Prefilled pens are often marketed for type 2 diabetics who need to use insulin. Insulin Pens Browse through our list of insulin pen reviews. You can also buy the insulin pens from the Diabetes Shop. Simply click on an insulin pen name to read the guide. How do I use an insulin pen to treat my diabetes? Using a pen is a relatively easy process. Some pens require gentle shaking before use. Once the cartridge is loaded, screw on a needle and prime the pen to clear air. Then dial in the exact dose that you require to deliver the insulin to the body. What is good about insulin pens as opposed to syringes? Insulin pens are very easy to use. They are great for young diabetics who need to deliver insulin at school. Furthermore, many diabetics find insulin pens almost painless. They are also portable and discreet, as well as not being as time-consuming as syringes. An accurate dose can be pre-set on the dosage dial, which can be useful for diabetes sufferers who also have impaired vision. Why might I not like insulin pens? Insulin pens are not right for 100% of diabetes patients. Insulin in pens and cartridges is generally more expensive than bottled insulin and syringes. Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Insulin Pens: How To Give A Shot

Many people with diabetes need to take insulin to keep their blood glucose in a good range. This can be scary for some people, especially for the first time. The truth is that insulin shots are not painful as people imagine because the needles are short and thin. Insulin shots are given into fatty tissue below the skin. This is called a subcutaneous (sub-kyu-TAY-nee-us) injection. The following instructions are for using most disposable insulin pens. If you are using a refillable pen, check with your doctor, diabetes educator or pharmacist on how to use. If you prefer to use a vial and syringe, refer to UPMC patient education page Insulin: How to Give a Shot. ADVANTAGES of insulin pens: Easy to use and carry Looks like a pen for writing (discreet/not easily noticed) No need to draw the insulin dose from a vial/bottle Can be used for most insulin types Doses can be easily dialed Less waste of expired insulin if not much insulin is used within time period designated (300 units in each pen)…see table end of this document To some people it may be less scary than a syringe DISADVANTAGES: Cannot mix different kinds of insulin together in a prescribed dose. Before you give the shot, you will need the following: Insulin pen Alcohol swab, or cotton ball moistened with alcohol Pen needle (be sure your doctor writes your prescription for the pen needles as well as the specific type of insulin pen) Hard plastic or metal container with a screw-on or tightly-secured lid Parts of an Insulin Pen Wash your hands. Check the drug label to be sure it is what your doctor prescribed. Check the expiration date on the pen. Do not use a drug that is past the expiration date. Also do not use if beyond number of days listed in table at end of this document once opened and in use. Remove pen cap Continue reading >>

Is An Insulin Pen Right For You?

Is An Insulin Pen Right For You?

Thinking About Trying an Insulin Pen? For decades, taking insulin required a syringe and a vial. Another option for taking insulin began about 20 years ago when the first insulin pen hit the market. Insulin pens, which look like oversize ink pens, generally contain 300 units of one type of insulin or a fixed combination of two insulins. The pen is a convenient, accurate, and discreet way to take insulin. The ability to quickly and easily deliver a dose of insulin wherever and whenever you need is the pen's biggest advantage. Also, if you lack dexterity in your fingers, an insulin pen might be easier for you to manage than a vial and syringe. "When a person's health plan will cover pens, I try to prescribe them," says cardiologist Steven Nash, M.D., of Manlius, New York. "I think they're much easier to use than syringes." Insulin pens are also great for traveling because they're small and can be kept at room temperature. "My insulin pen has made taking insulin easier," says Marsha LaClair, 41, of Austin, Texas, who has type 1 diabetes. "I travel frequently, and now packing to manage my diabetes is a breeze." Reusable and Disposable Pens Insulin pens fall into two categories: reusable and disposable. Reusable insulin pens use replaceable cartridges filled with insulin; they usually contain 300 units of insulin each. When the cartridge is empty, or if you've stored your pen and cartridge at room temperature for more than 28 days, the cartridge is discarded and a new one is inserted. The more commonly used disposable pens come prefilled with insulin. When the pen is empty or has been stored at room temperature for more than 28 days, discard the whole pen. However, insulin pens do not come with a needle attached. You need to attach an insulin-pen needle to the end of the pen Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

Insulin Pens: Improving Adherence And Reducing Costs

The advantages offered by insulin pens may help improve patient adherence. Currently 8.3% of the United States adult population, or 25.8 million people, have diabetes. Of these cases, more than 90% are cases of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) and at least 1 million are estimated to be cases of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM). Although a variety of oral medications are available for patients with diabetes, insulins remain an important component of treatment.1,2 Insulins are the standard therapy in patients with T1DM and are ultimately used in patients with T2DM who do not respond adequately to other treatment modalities. Although in some settings insulins may be administered intravenously (eg, with an insulin pump), the vast majority of insulin administrations are subcutaneous injections.1,2 Available Forms and Administration In the United States, 2 types of insulins are available: recombinant human insulins and insulin analogs. Recombinant human insulin is available from 2 manufacturers (Humulin by Eli Lilly and Novolin by Novo Nordisk); each of these is available in a regular form and in a longer-acting neutral protamine hagedorn (NPH) form. Unlike recombinant human insulins, insulin analogs are structurally modified forms of insulin that are designed to either lower blood sugar rapidly or maintain low blood sugar levels over time. These insulin analogs may be classified as rapid-acting and long-acting insulins. Rapid-acting insulins include insulin lispro, insulin aspart, and insulin glulisine, and long-acting insulins include insulin glargine and insulin detemir. Premixed formulations of insulin are also available.1,2 Regardless of the differences between insulin formulations, all conventional types of insulin can be administered subcutaneously. Subcutaneous injectio Continue reading >>

How Do I Use Them?

How Do I Use Them?

How Do I Use Them? “My Doctor Says I Should Begin Using an Insulin Pen...†BD Getting Started™ Using Insulin Pens and Pen Needles An insulin pen is a convenient way to give yourself an insulin shot or injection. It looks like a large fountain pen and comes in two basic types: disposable and reusable. Disposable pens come already filled with insulin. When a pen is empty or expired, it is simply discarded. Reuseable pens have a replaceable cartridge of insulin. The cartridge is replaced when the insulin is used or expired. Whichever type of pen you use, you will need to attach a new pen needle onto the pen with each injection and remove it after every use. The pen may be kept in your pocket or purse at room temperature while in use. The insulin should not get warm or be exposed to direct sunlight. Store unused insulin pen cartridges and pre-filled pens in the refrigerator. Note: Pens from different manufacturer’s operate differently. Check pen manufacturer’s guidelines for operating instructions and insulin expiration details. Dosers are larger and easier to handle than insulin pens. They have clear, readable dials and easy-to- grip shapes that are designed for people with vision problems and poor hand control. An insulin doser works like a re-useable pen. It holds a replaceable cartridge of insulin. The dose is dialed and delivered through a pen needle. Insulin Pens and Dosers – easy to carry, dose and use Parts of a Pen Needle Each pen needle has an outer shield, an inner shield, and a paper tab. How to attach the needle to a pen 1. Remove the paper tab from the outer shield. 2. Push the needle straight onto the pen and twist until it is tight. 3. Pull off the outer shield and set it aside. You will need it later to remove the needle Continue reading >>

Insulin Pen Overview

Insulin Pen Overview

Insulin Pen Overview An insulin pen (or just "pen") is an insulin delivery system that generally looks like a large pen, uses an insulin cartridge rather than a vial, and uses disposable needles. Pens are the predominant insulin delivery system in most of the world, except the United States, where syringes and insulin vials still dominate. Pens are made by Novo Nordisk, Eli Lilly, Disetronic, and Owen Mumford. Disetronic makes pens for other companies, including Aventis. Some pens use replaceable insulin cartridges, and some pens use a non-replaceable cartridge and are disposed of after use. All pens use replaceable needles. Most pens use special pen needles (see discussion below), which can be extremely short and thin. The Disetronic pen, however, uses the same syringe as their DTron insulin pump, which has a traditional syringe leuer lock needle. Pens With Replaceable Cartridges Pens with replaceable cartridges are made by Novo Nordisk, Owen Mumford, and Disetronic. BD used to make pens, including the BD Pen Mini, but they are no longer making pens. Insulin cartridges for pens come in 3.0 ml and 1.5 ml sizes, with 3.0 being the predominant size. The 1.5 ml size is being phased out and availability may be limited. Insulin cartridges are made by Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Aventis. Prefilled Pens Pens that come with a prefilled insulin cartridge are thrown away when the insulin is used up. Prefilled pens are sold by insulin makers Eli Lilly, Novo Nordisk, and Aventis. Lilly only sells prefilled pens which come with a variety of Lilly insulins, including Humalog, Regular, NPH, and various mixes, including Humalog mixes. Novo Nordisk sells both prefilled pens and pens that take replaceable insulin cartridges with NovoLog and other Novo Nordisk insulins. Aventis sells pre Continue reading >>

Insulin Pens

Insulin Pens

What are Insulin Pens? Insulin pens are devices that can provide an easy way to carry and give insulin when away from home. Also, for people who are not comfortable working with syringes and bottles to draw up and measure individual doses, the pens provide a convenient and accurate alternative. The goal is to inject the insulin into the subcutaneous tissue between the top layer of the skin, the dermis and the underlying muscle layer. There are two types of insulin pens: those that are completely disposable after providing a single dose of insulin, those that use disposable cartridges to provide multiple doses. If you use more than one type of insulin, you must use a separate pen for each type. The basic method of use is similar for both pens and there are four main steps to be learned. An insulin pen has three components: a base which contains the mechanism for measuring the correct dose, a holder for the cartridge of insulin, a cap, which is removed and replaced by the needle prior to the injection. Follow the manufacturer’s instructions to remove the cap, separate the base from the cartridge holder by unscrewing it. Rewind the base dose regulating mechanism back to zero and put down the base. Pick up the cartridge holder. Shake out the used cartridge. Check that the new cartridge contains the correct insulin and insert it, metal end first, into the holder. Screw the cartridge holder back onto the base. Keep a record of all your injections and also record when you begin a new cartridge. Subtract the total insulin used in previous injections from the total of 150 units in each cartridge to be sure you have enough insulin left for the next dose. Clean the end of the cartridge holder and the projecting cartridge with an alcohol swab. Remove the seal from the end of the Continue reading >>

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Indications And Usage For Apidra® (insulin Glulisine [rdna Origin] Injection)

Prescription Apidra® is for adults with type 2 diabetes or adults and children (4 years and older) with type 1 diabetes to improve blood sugar control. Apidra® given by subcutaneous injection is usually used with a longer-acting insulin. When used as a mealtime insulin, Apidra® should be given within 15 minutes before or within 20 minutes after starting a meal. Apidra® may be infused subcutaneously by external insulin infusion pumps. Do not use Apidra® during a low blood sugar reaction (hypoglycemia) or if you are allergic to any of the ingredients in Apidra®. Do not share needles, insulin pens or syringes with others. Do NOT reuse needles. You must test your blood sugar levels while using insulin, such as Apidra®. Do not make any changes to your dose or type of insulin without talking to your healthcare provider. Any change of insulin should be made cautiously and only under medical supervision. Apidra® must only be used if the solution is clear and colorless with no particles visible. Apidra®, when given by injection under the skin, should not be mixed with insulins other than NPH. Do not mix Apidra® with any insulin when used in the pump or for intravenous administration. The most common side effect of insulin, including Apidra®, is low blood sugar (hypoglycemia), which may be serious. Some people may experience symptoms such as shaking, sweating, fast heartbeat, and blurred vision. Severe hypoglycemia may be serious and life threatening. It may cause harm to your heart or brain. Other possible side effects may include low blood potassium, injection site reactions, such as changes in fat tissue at the injection site, and allergic reactions, such as itching and rash. Less common, but potentially more serious or life-threatening, is generalized allergy to in Continue reading >>

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