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What Happens When You Get Too Much Insulin?

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

Teenage Girl Died Of Insulin Overdose After Injecting Herself With Diabetic Boyfriend's Pen 'in Cry For Attention'

A teenage girl who died after injecting herself with insulin may have taken it to try to lose weight. Charlie Dunne, 19, used an insulin pen belonging to her diabetic boyfriend while he was out at a hospital appointment. An inquest heard the trainee hairdresser may have taken the hormone previously after hearing that it could help slimmers. But the teenager, who was fit and healthy, would have been unaware of the ‘catastrophic’ danger the drug posed to non-diabetics, a coroner said. Miss Dunne was discovered collapsed at the home in Atherton, Greater Manchester, she shared with boyfriend Terence Rhoden, 28, when he returned hours later. She suffered brain damage caused by a dramatic drop in blood sugar and died in hospital six days later. Police later investigated claims by Miss Dunne’s family that Mr Rhoden had confessed to injecting her with insulin in the past to help her lose weight. But he denied doing so and officers found no evidence that he was involved in his girlfriend’s death. Bolton Coroner’s Court was told that ‘bubbly’ Miss Dunne was a regular at her local Methodist church, where she was given the community title of ‘rose queen’ for her charity fundraising. However, the inquest was told she suffered mood swings and had tried to overdose on tablets during a previous relationship. She also claimed to have suffered a miscarriage and was worried she could not have children, despite a lack of medical evidence to support her fears. The court heard that Mr Rhoden was woken when Miss Dunne returned from her local pub in an ‘agitated’ state on December 17 last year and threatened to take painkillers. She told him to leave, saying he was ‘too good for her’. After talking, she calmed down and fell asleep on the sofa. Mr Rhoden left for his a Continue reading >>

When Too Much Insulin Sensitivity Backfires

When Too Much Insulin Sensitivity Backfires

0 0 Dr. Richard Maurer, ND @drrichardmaurer The title, “When too much insulin sensitivity backfires,” makes me remember a favorite quote from Mark Twain— “Too much of anything is bad, but too much good whiskey is barely enough.” I love going to the PaleoFx conferences and recently chatted with Robb Wolf on his podcast where we continued a conversation from a panel we were both on. On the topic of insulin resistance (IR) we agreed that the term is a little passé but I stuck to my guns and defend the valuable description. IR and her alter ego insulin sensitivity allow us to understand metabolic health and performance—simply, the more someone moves toward insulin sensitivity from IR, the healthier and longer they are likely to live. But really? Definitions first: Insulin resistance is narrowly defined in conventional medical lexicon as elevated fasting blood sugar (glucose). On it’s own, this test does not indicate insulin resistance half the time in my experience—exercise, coffee, anxiety, and a host of medications can all elevate fasting blood glucose. In The Blood Code: Unlock the secrets of your metabolism, I define Insulin resistance: “Insulin is the primary hormone that responds to what you eat. You release insulin when you eat carbohydrates and—to a lesser degree—protein. Insulin signals for the storage of sugars, and the making and stockpiling of fats; it also helps your cells uptake proteins and magnesium. Over many generations, your body has evolved to favor the ability to build and store a little extra, by leaving some extra glucose behind, and by storing extra fats for future energy. Over 40 percent of people in the United States—more than have blue eyes—store so much extra fat and sugar that it is causing high blood pressure, high bl Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

Low Blood Sugar And Your Mind

One danger of low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) is that you might not know you’re having it. Low glucose levels affect your brain and can leave you unable to recognize a problem or seek a solution. Low blood sugar is not a symptom of diabetes. It’s a side effect of diabetes treatment. It happens when you have too much insulin for the amount of food you have eaten. You can get hypoglycemia (high-po-glye-SEEM-e-uh) if you take insulin or if you take pills that stimulate your body to release insulin from the pancreas. These pills include sulfonylureas, such as chlorpropamide (brand name Diabinese), tolbutamide (Orinase), glyburide (DiaBeta, Glynase, Micronase), glimepiride (Amaryl), glipizide (Glucotrol, Glucotrol XL), tolazamide (Tolinase), and tolbutamide (Orinase). Other drugs that raise insulin and can lead to hypoglycemia include the meglitinides, such as repaglinide (Prandin) and nateglinide (Starlix). Combination drugs that contain sulfonylureas or meglitinides can also potentially cause lows. You can see a more complete list of drugs that cause hypoglycemia here. If you have too much insulin and don’t eat enough, or you exercise too much, you will likely develop low blood sugar. The symptoms can range from annoying, like excessive sweating, to life-threatening, like passing out while driving or having seizures. Celia Kirkman, RN, CDE, wrote that “Hypoglycemia is a condition in which the brain does not have enough glucose to carry out its many functions.” You can’t pay attention to things, you’re less aware of your environment; you have less control of your emotions. This is what makes low blood sugar hard to treat and prevent. Your brain is supposed to pick up warning signs and address problems, but your brain is impaired by low glucose. Symptoms of low Continue reading >>

“i Just Injected 46 Units Of The Wrong Insulin!”

“i Just Injected 46 Units Of The Wrong Insulin!”

I have lived with type 2 diabetes for thirteen years, and I know very well howto take care of myself. In fact, I have it down to a routine. The flaw of aroutine activity, however, is that it is so very routine: you go through themotions without thinking. And that, as I learned to my deep chagrin, can bedangerous. On a recent speaking trip, I was just about to step into the shower when Iremembered that it was time for my Lantus injection. No problem-I stepped awayfrom the shower, prepared the dose, and injected the insulin. As soon as thedeed was done, however, dismay overwhelmed me. I had grabbed the wrong insulinand had just injected 46 units of rapid-acting Apidra instead of slow-releaseLantus. And I was alone in my hotel room, stark naked. My experience as a diabetes trainer kicked into overdrive as I yanked everythingout of the mini-fridge, desperately counting the carbohydrates available tocounter the quick-acting Apidra. The procedure I teach to treat hypoglycemia(low blood sugar) is to eat fifteen grams of fast-acting carbohydrates, waitfifteen minutes, and then check your blood sugar level. This process shouldcontinue until your blood sugar is over 70 mg/dl. But because I did not knowhow low my blood sugar would plummet on 46 units of Apidra, my overridingthought was to stuff down as many simple carbohydrates as I could, as fast as Icould. That night, thankfully, the mini-fridge was uncharacteristically full. I sweptup two pieces of leftover bread, two small bunches of grapes, crackers, and areal Coke, in addition to my usual glucose tablets and orange juice. One part ofmy brain began methodically counting the carbohydrates that I was ingesting: thirty-three grams from the orange juice, twenty from the bread, twelve from theglucose tablets. The other part of my Continue reading >>

This Is Exactly What Happens To Your Body When You Eat A Ton Of Sugar

This Is Exactly What Happens To Your Body When You Eat A Ton Of Sugar

As mouth-watering as a sugar-laden sundae or icing-topped cupcake is, we should all know by now that sugar isn't exactly healthy. In fact, it may be one of the worst things you can eat (that is, if you're trying to live a long, healthy life). One study from UC San Francisco actually found that drinking sugary drinks like soda can age your body on a cellular level as quickly as cigarettes. The way the sweet stuff impacts your body is way more complex than just causing weight gain. In fact, when you eat a ton of sugar, almost every part of your body feels the strain—and that's bad news for your health in both the short term and especially the long term. From an initial insulin spike to upping your chances of kidney failure down the road, this is what really happens in your body when you load up on sugar. Your brain responds to sugar the same way it would to cocaine. Eating sugar creates a surge of feel-good brain chemicals dopamine and serotonin. So does using certain drugs, like cocaine. And just like a drug, your body craves more after the initial high. "You then become addicted to that feeling, so every time you eat it you want to eat more," explains Gina Sam, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Gastrointestinal Motility Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Your insulin spikes to regulate your blood sugar. "Once you eat glucose, your body releases insulin, a hormone from your pancreas," Dr. Sam explains. The insulin's job is to absorb the excess glucose in the blood and stabilize sugar levels. And a little while later you get that familiar sugar crash. Once the insulin does its job, your blood sugar drops again. Which means you've just experienced a sugar rush, and then a drastic drop, leaving you feeling drained. "That's the feeling you get when you've gone to the buffet a Continue reading >>

What Happens To Your Body When You Binge On Sugar

What Happens To Your Body When You Binge On Sugar

As mouth-watering as a sugar-laden sundae or icing-topped cupcake is, we should all know by now that sugar isn’t exactly healthy. In fact, it may be one of the worst things you can eat (that is, if you’re trying to live a long, healthy life). One study from UC San Francisco actually found that drinking sugary drinks like soda can age your body on a cellular level as quickly as cigarettes. The way the sweet stuff impacts your body is way more complex than just causing weight gain. In fact, when you eat a ton of sugar, almost every part of your body feels the strain—and that’s bad news for your health in both the short term and especially the long term. From an initial insulin spike to upping your chances of kidney failure down the road, this is what really happens in your body when you load up on sugar. Your brain responds to sugar the same way it would to cocaine. Eating sugar creates a surge of feel-good brain chemicals dopamine and serotonin. So does using certain drugs, like cocaine. And just like a drug, your body craves more after the initial high. “You then become addicted to that feeling, so every time you eat it you want to eat more,” explains Gina Sam, M.D., M.P.H., director of the Gastrointestinal Motility Center at The Mount Sinai Hospital. Your insulin spikes to regulate your blood sugar. “Once you eat glucose, your body releases insulin, a hormone from your pancreas,” Dr. Sam explains. The insulin’s job is to absorb the excess glucose in the blood and stabilize sugar levels. And a little while later you get that familiar sugar crash. Once the insulin does its job, your blood sugar drops again. Which means you’ve just experienced a sugar rush, and then a drastic drop, leaving you feeling drained. “That’s the feeling you get when you� Continue reading >>

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar?

What Happens To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar?

By Dr. Mercola You add it to your morning cup of coffee or tea. You bake it into pastries, cakes, and cookies. You even sprinkle it all over your breakfast cereal or your oatmeal for added "flavor." But that's not all. It's also hidden in some beloved "treats" that people consume on a daily basis, such as sodas, fruit juices, candies, and ice cream. It also lurks in almost all processed foods, including breads, meats, and even your favorite condiments like Worcestershire sauce and ketchup. It's none other than sugar. Most people view sugary foods as tasty, satisfying, and irresistible treats. But I believe that there are three words that can more accurately describe sugar: toxic, addicting, and deadly. Sugar, in my opinion, is one of the most damaging substances that you can ingest – and what's terrifying about it is that it's just so abundant in our everyday diet. This intense addiction to sugar is becoming rampant, not just among adults, but in children as well. But how exactly does sugar work in our body, and what are the side effects of eating too much sugar on people's health? Why Is Excessive Sugar Bad for Your Health? Today, an average American consumes about 32 teaspoons of sugar per day. New numbers came out in February 2015. The Washington Post did a story on it using grams (4 grams = 1 tsp). They quoted Euromonitor's study, which said Americans are now consuming 126 grams, which would equal close to 32 teaspoons. Euromonitor's study costs $1200 to access; the Washington Post interprets the study for free here. It's definitely alarming, considering the average Englishman during the 1700s only consumed four pounds of sugar per year1 – and that's most likely from healthful natural sources like fruits, and not from the processed foods you see in supermarket s Continue reading >>

10 Scary Things That Happen To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar

10 Scary Things That Happen To Your Body When You Eat Too Much Sugar

Studio KIWI/ Shutterstock The INSIDER Summary: Scientists are constantly studying and debating the risks and consequences of a sugar-rich "Western diet." Eating too much sugar is correlated with weight gain and obesity. Scientists have also associated eating too many sweets with increased risk of heart disease. Other effects include skin problems and anxiety. We already know that modern Western diets are loaded with added sweeteners (even our bread has excess sugar in it). With obesity numbers skyrocketing and the nutritional science community oscillating between sugar, fat, and carbs as the scapegoat du jour, it's hard to know what exactly is safe to eat. There are alot of myths surrounding the effects sugar has on our health. But even though humans need glucose to survive, it's no secret that the exorbitant amount of sugar found in everyday foods like processed snack foods, canned food, and soft drinks have become too much for our bodies to handle. INSIDER has rounded up 10 of the scariest effects a sugar-rich diet can have on your overall health, with expert input from Dr. Jennifer Haythe, a cardiologist at Columbia Presbyterian Hospital in New York, Rebecca Lee, a registered nurse and founder of RemediesForMe.com, and Colette Heimowitz, a nutritionist at Atkins Nutritionals, Inc. who has worked with celebrities like Kim Kardashian. Multiple studies have linked the consumption of sugary foods and drinks to weight gain. Research published in the "American Journal of Clinical Nutrition" in 2011 confirmed a "positive association" between drinking soft drinks regularly and the rising obesity epidemic. "Sugar-sweetened beverages, particularly soda, provide little nutritional benefit and increase weight gain and probably the risk of diabetes, fractures, and dental caries," Continue reading >>

> Diabetes: What's True And False?

> Diabetes: What's True And False?

If you're like most people with diabetes, you'll get all kinds of advice about it from friends and family or online. Some of this information is wrong. Here's the truth about some of the common things you might hear. No, it doesn't. Type 1 diabetes happens when cells in the pancreas that make insulin are destroyed. This happens because something goes wrong with the body's immune system. It has nothing to do with how much sugar a person eats. Sugar doesn't cause diabetes. But there is one way that sugar can influence whether a person gets type 2 diabetes. Consuming too much sugar (or sugary foods and drinks) can make people put on weight. Gaining weight leads to type 2 diabetes in some people. Of course, eating too much sugar isn't the only reason why people gain weight. Weight gain from eating too much of any food can make a person's chance of getting diabetes greater. Can people with diabetes eat sweets? Yes! You can have your cake and eat it too, just not the whole cake! Like everyone, people with diabetes should put the brakes on eating too many sweets. But you can still enjoy sweets sometimes. Do people "grow out of" diabetes? People with type 1 diabetes don't grow out of it. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas stops making insulin and won't make it again. People with type 1 diabetes will always need to take insulin, at least until scientists find a cure for diabetes. People with type 2 diabetes will always have a tendency to get high blood sugar levels. But if they take steps to live a healthier life, it can sometimes lower their blood sugar. If people eat healthy foods and exercise enough to get their blood sugar levels back on track, doctors might say they can stop taking insulin or other medicines. Can you catch diabetes from a person who has it? No. Diabetes is Continue reading >>

Can You Produce Too Much Insulin?

Can You Produce Too Much Insulin?

Sugar, in the form of glucose, is your body’s primary fuel source. However, having high glucose levels in your blood is damaging to your organs and nerves. To solve this problem, your body produces a hormone called insulin to help keep blood glucose levels within a normal range. Unfortunately, it’s possible to produce too much of this necessary hormone, which increases your risk for chronic diseases. Blood Glucose Regulation Blood sugar control is a carefully-orchestrated process involving your pancreas and liver. Your body breaks down food that contains carbohydrates into glucose, which your cells need for energy. The glucose can’t get into cells on its own, so your pancreas secretes the hormone insulin to signal your cells to let glucose in. Any extra glucose that your cells can’t use right away is sent to the liver where it’s converted to a storage form of glucose called glycogen. The liver converts glycogen back to glucose and releases into the blood stream when glucose levels decline between meals. These actions keep blood sugar levels within normal range. Producing Too Much Insulin Excess insulin production occurs when your cells become insensitive to insulin. Think of it this way: insulin knocks on the door of your cells to tell them to let glucose in, but the cells don’t answer the door in a timely manner. The pancreas releases more insulin in an effort to get glucose into cells and out of the bloodstream, where too much sugar floating around can damage nerves. A vicious cycle ensues where the pancreas produces more insulin to keep blood sugar balanced. After a while the pancreas can have trouble keeping up with the extra insulin production. Then blood sugar levels rise, increasing the risk of type 2 diabetes. Weight Loss Improves Insulin Sensitivity Continue reading >>

You And Your Hormones

You And Your Hormones

What is insulin? Insulin is a hormone made by an organ located behind the stomach called the pancreas. Here, insulin is released into the bloodstream by specialised cells called beta cells found in areas of the pancreas called islets of langerhans (the term insulin comes from the Latin insula meaning island). Insulin can also be given as a medicine for patients with diabetes because they do not make enough of their own. It is usually given in the form of an injection. Insulin is released from the pancreas into the bloodstream. It is a hormone essential for us to live and has many effects on the whole body, mainly in controlling how the body uses carbohydrate and fat found in food. Insulin allows cells in the muscles, liver and fat (adipose tissue) to take up sugar (glucose) that has been absorbed into the bloodstream from food. This provides energy to the cells. This glucose can also be converted into fat to provide energy when glucose levels are too low. In addition, insulin has several other metabolic effects (such as stopping the breakdown of protein and fat). How is insulin controlled? When we eat food, glucose is absorbed from our gut into the bloodstream. This rise in blood glucose causes insulin to be released from the pancreas. Proteins in food and other hormones produced by the gut in response to food also stimulate insulin release. However, once the blood glucose levels return to normal, insulin release slows down. In addition, hormones released in times of acute stress, such as adrenaline, stop the release of insulin, leading to higher blood glucose levels. The release of insulin is tightly regulated in healthy people in order to balance food intake and the metabolic needs of the body. Insulin works in tandem with glucagon, another hormone produced by the pan Continue reading >>

So Which Is It, With Type 2 Diabetes? Do You Make Too Much Insulin Or Not Enough?

So Which Is It, With Type 2 Diabetes? Do You Make Too Much Insulin Or Not Enough?

When you have Type 2 diabetes and you have been told that you have it because your pancreas either fails to make enough insulin or that the insulin that it makes is not able to be used properly (that’s a mouthful), have you ever thought to yourself, “Huh?” Has this information been filed away in the part of your brain labeled, “Information I don’t understand and sounds too confusing to learn,” just waiting to be purged when possible? Whenever I hear a patient being told this I often wonder if they’re going to ask, “Well, which is it, do I make too much insulin or not enough, and why does this happen?” I think if I had diabetes I would want to know. Let me see if I can explain it here. I will start off by reminding you that it takes approximately 10 years to go from completely normal to actually having diabetes. I am sure this varies somewhat from person to person, however on average it takes 10 years. After you eat a meal that has sugar in it, the sugar will enter the blood stream. In response to sugar entering the blood the beta cells, located throughout the pancreas, start making insulin. Typically, the greater the amount of sugar that enters the blood, the greater the amount of insulin produced by the beta cells in the pancreas. At least, this is the way it is supposed to work. The insulin produced in the beta cells then enters the blood stream and looks for some sugar. Once it finds a sugar molecule it swims over and grabs a hold of it. (A little-known fact is that insulin only has one arm, so it can only grab ahold of one sugar.) The insulin then takes the sugar out of the blood vessel and over to a muscle, fat or liver cell. Once close to the cell the insulin starts heading over to one of the cell’s many doors. The insulin then opens the door t Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin is an important hormone used in medical treatments for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It helps the body's cells to properly absorb sugar. Insulin is a lifesaving medication when taken correctly, but an insulin overdose can have some serious side effects. This article explores signs of insulin overdose to look out for, as well as steps to take to avoid insulin overdoses. Contents of this article: Safe vs. unsafe insulin doses There are a few things to consider to ensure a correct insulin dose. Insulin doses can vary greatly from person to person. The normal dose for one person may be considered an overdose for another. Basal insulin The insulin needed to keep the blood sugar steady throughout the day is called basal insulin. The amount of insulin needed changes from person to person based on what time of day they take it, and whether their body is resistant to insulin or not. It is best to consult a doctor to figure out the appropriate basal insulin dosage. Mealtime insulin Mealtime insulin is insulin that is taken after a meal. Glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream as the body breaks down food, which raises the blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, this extra sugar must be met with extra insulin so the body can use it properly. There are a few different factors to be considered in terms of the mealtime insulin levels. People with diabetes have to consider: their pre-meal blood sugar how many carbs are in the food they are eating if they plan to do anything active after the meal Then they must factor in their own level of insulin sensitivity and the blood sugar target they want to hit after the insulin is taken. The process can be complicated and, as such, there is room for error. Other variables There are also a few different types of Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose

Insulin Overdose

Tweet Taking too much insulin can lead to hypoglycemia. This can become particularly serious if your insulin dose was significantly more than it should have been. If you are worried that you have overdosed on insulin, take ample fast-acting carbohydrate immediately and seek advice from your health team, or the out-of-hours service at your local hospital, if applicable. Symptoms of an insulin overdose The list of symptoms below are symptoms of hypoglycemia which can result from an insulin overdose: Depressed mood Drowsiness Headache Hunger Inability to concentrate Irritability Disorientation Nausea Nervousness Personality changes Rapid heartbeat Restlessness Sleep disturbances Slurred speech Pale skin Sweating Tingling Tremor Unsteady movements Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sources of dietary sugar. The good news is for very many people with type 2 diabetes this is all they have to do to stay well. If you can keep your blood sugar lower by avoiding dietary sugar, likely you will never need long-term medication. Type 2 diabetes was formerly known as non-insulin-dependent or adult-onset diabetes due to its occurrence mainly in people over 40. However, type 2 Continue reading >>

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