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What Happens If You Inject Insulin Into Muscle

Insulin Injection Sites: A Review

Insulin Injection Sites: A Review

When it comes to injecting insulin, the stomach, the buttocks, the back of the arm and the thigh have something in common. They usually contain enough fatty issue to be good depots for insulin administration. As any educator will tell you, insulin should be injected into fat. If injected directly into muscle, aside from being painful, it will be absorbed much too rapidly. The insulin may reach your blood stream before your digestive system has the time to release glucose from the food you eat. (There are other areas on the body, for example, the breasts, which have adequate fatty tissue but have not been sufficiently studied to determine their absorption rates.) Each of these approved areas absorbs insulin at a slightly different rate, and knowing this can help you make the best decision about where to inject depending on your blood glucose. In general, insulin is more quickly absorbed from the stomach followed by the arm, the thigh, and the buttocks. For example if your blood glucose is low before a meal, you may want to inject into the buttock area because insulin is absorbed most slowly here. On the other hand, if you are hyperglycemic the stomach may be the best choice as it has the fastest absorption rate. This variability is most prominent with NPH and regular insulin and not as much a factor with the rapid acting insulins. Rotate your sites Injecting insulin into the same site over and over again can lead to the fat below the skin becoming hard and lumpy. Aside from being unsightly, it can change the way your insulin is absorbed so you won’t easily know when the insulin will start working or peak. Tips for Injecting Insulin Stomach: Stay at least two inches away from the belly button, or any scars or moles. Thigh: Inject at least 4 inches (or approximately one Continue reading >>

Injecting Your Dog

Injecting Your Dog

Administration of medicine by injection is often referred to as giving drugs by the parenteral route. The other main means of administering treatment is via the mouth and digestive system - the oral route. Effective administration of medicine is a key part of most veterinary treatments and many medications are most effective when given by injection. Administration of medicine by injection is also essential for some drugs that are destroyed by acids in the stomach, eg insulin. Injection routes(back to top) Injections can given into: Muscle (intramuscular injection). Tissue under the skin (subcutaneous injection) Veins (intravenous injection). Skin (intradermal injection). Body cavities, ie abdominal cavity (known as intraperitoneal injection) or thoracic cavity (known as intrapleural injection). Bone (intraosseous injection). Abbreviations are often used for injection routes, eg IM for intramuscular; SC or SQ for subcutaneous, and so on. This factsheet will only consider the intramuscular and subcutaneous routes as these are the techniques most likely to be encountered by dog owners. Clean techniques should always be used when administering injections. If the dog's coat is very dirty it should be washed and if necessary, clipped. An injection should never be administered through dirty or infected skin. The skin may be swabbed with alcohol at the injection site, though this is not always done for routine injections. Your veterinary surgeon will advise if they think this is necessary. Different formulations of injection are used for the different routes and it is particularly important not to accidentally administer an injection directly into the blood if it is not intended for intravenous use. This can accidentally happen with intramuscular injections if some simple preca Continue reading >>

Injecting Insulin

Injecting Insulin

Injecting insulin at home is done subcutaneously, under the skin, but not into muscle or vein. See also Syringe and Insulin pen. It's best to pull up some loose skin into a tent[1][2], then insert the needle firmly, bevel side up[3][4] for comfort[5]. {C BD has animations with narrations to help you learn how to draw insulin properly[6]. One can select from drawing one insulin or combining two insulins in the same syringe. Selecting this and the style of syringe you use personalizes the demo for your needs. The presentation is very clear and unhurried. BD also has a slideshow which shows how to inject your dog[7] or cat[8]. Injecting any insulin at the same site repeatedly over time or blunting a needle with re-use[10] can cause a lipodystrophy: either lipoatrophy[11] or lipohypertrophy. Either makes absorption unreliable. But varying the injection site can cause variability in action profile, too. This page illustrates[12] illustrates the most common areas humans with diabetes inject insulin and explains how absorption differs in various areas of the human body. This is true for ALL insulins. The new shot area needn't be very far from where the last shot was given--the distance of the width of 2 fingers will do fine as a measure[13]. Most of us dealing with pet diabetes vary the side we give the injections in--right side mornings and left side evenings, for example. This is another help in avoiding giving shots in the same areas[14]. Many people give insulin shots in the scruff of the pet's neck, which is now considered to be a less than optimum choice. The neck area provides poor insulin Absorption, due to it not having many capillaries, veins. etc. (vascularization). Other sites suggested by Dr. Greco include the flank and armpit[15]. Intervet recommends giving injec Continue reading >>

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

The Dos And Don'ts Of Insulin Injections

When diet, exercise, and oral medications aren’t enough to manage type 2 diabetes, it may be time for insulin. The most important aspect of insulin therapy is using it exactly as prescribed. Still, remembering all the little details can be tricky, and certain mistakes are common. By following these dos and don’ts, you can avoid medication mishaps and keep insulin working as it should. DO: Rotate the insertion site (while keeping the body part consistent). “Insulin is absorbed at different speeds depending on where you inject it, so it’s best to consistently use the same part of the body for each of your daily injections,” says Doreen Riccelli, BSN, director of education at Lake Pointe Medical Center in Rowlett, Texas. “For example, don’t inject yourself in the abdomen on Saturday and in the thigh on Sunday,” she says. “If you choose the thigh for your evening injection, then use the thigh for all of your evening injections.” That said, within the specific body area, it’s important to move each injection site at least one finger’s width from the previous injection site to avoid the creation of hard lumps or extra fat deposits, which could change the way insulin is absorbed. DON’T: Store insulin incorrectly. Insulin can generally be stored at room temperature (59 to 86° F), either opened or unopened, for one month. When kept in the refrigerator, unopened bottles last until the expiration date printed on the bottle. Opened bottles stored in the refrigerator should be used or discarded after a month. Never store insulin in direct sunlight, in the freezer, or near heating or air conditioning vents, ovens, or radiators. It should also not be left in a very warm or cold car. Store it in an insulated case if needed. DO: Work closely with your doctor. Continue reading >>

How To Inject Insulin

How To Inject Insulin

The thought of injecting yourself with insulin takes a little getting used to, and doing it properly requires some practice. But once you've made it through your first shot, insulin injection will quickly become a regular part of your daily routine. Injecting at the proper depth is an important part of good injection technique. Most healthcare professionals recommend that insulin be injected in the subcutaneous fat, which is the layer of fat just below the skin. If you inject too deep, the insulin could go into muscle, where it's absorbed faster but might not last so long (and, it hurts more when you inject into muscle). If the injection isn't deep enough, the insulin goes into the skin, which affects the insulin's onset and duration of action. Most people pinch up a fold of skin and insert the needle at a 90° angle to the skin fold. To pinch your skin properly, follow these steps: Squeeze a couple of inches of skin between your thumb and two fingers, pulling the skin and fat away from the underlying muscle. (If you use a 5 millimeter mini-pen needle to inject, you don't have to pinch up the skin when injecting at a 90° angle; with this shorter needle, you don't have to worry about injecting into muscle.) Hold the pinch so the needle doesn't go into the muscle. Push the plunger (or button if you're using a pen) to inject the insulin. Release the grip on the skin fold. Remove the needle from the skin. Note that not everyone injects at a 90° angle. If you inject into an area of the body that has less fat, you may need to inject at less than a 45° angle, to avoid injecting into a muscle. The angle you should use to insert the syringe or pen needle into your body depends on your body type, the injection site, and the length of the needle that you use. Your healthcare pr Continue reading >>

Should I Inject Insulin Into A Vein?

Should I Inject Insulin Into A Vein?

I am 20 years old and have type 1 diabetes. When I am off the insulin pump, my blood sugar gets unstable and can take more than 48 hours to go down. Two friends told me that to handle this, they just inject a very small amount of insulin directly into the bloodstream. I know it sounds crazy, but this would save me time and money. Is it safe? Continue reading >>

Injecting In Upper Arm?

Injecting In Upper Arm?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi my nurse advised me to only inject my Humalog insulin into my stomach, and my Lantus into my thigh - I asked if I could take the Humalog in my upper arm (dont wanna get my tummy out if i have to do it in public!) she told me I couldn't and I didn't ask why. I inject my Bolus into my upper arm as it is more convenient ,I know the reaction time of my insulin there and I have no fat at all on my stomach so it gets used too quick from that site. My Basal I inject into my Butt cheek as I have booty and only do this on waking and at bed time. While I'm out and about my upper arm is the easiest ,least hassle and my DSN's are fine with it, I have told them and they said fine so long as I rotate arms ,places on arms. I had to make sure I have the shortest needle they do as I have high muscle to body fat ratio and with a longer needle I went into the muscle a few times...this causes fast Hypo's . Using my legs always caused Hypo's fast..if you get chance to ask her why you can't use your arm I would be interested but I've had the all clear from the professionals and have used them for years with no problems.....just watch out for the needle length if you are skinny. I think it also depends how active you are. Insulin is more effective/used quicker if you exercise the area you've injected into. Eg if you jab in your thigh and go for a bike ride, you may go hypo faster than if you injected into your stomach. I think this is another reason why DSNs say 'no' to injecting into the arm - arms tend to be quite active even in ordinary daily life. Lots of people do use their arms with no problems though, as proved by posters on here. - a small rant - why don't some D Continue reading >>

Direct Administration Of Insulin Into Skeletal Muscle Reveals That The Transport Of Insulin Across The Capillary Endothelium Limits The Time Course Of Insulin To Activate Glucose Disposal

Direct Administration Of Insulin Into Skeletal Muscle Reveals That The Transport Of Insulin Across The Capillary Endothelium Limits The Time Course Of Insulin To Activate Glucose Disposal

OBJECTIVE—Intravenous insulin infusion rapidly increases plasma insulin, yet glucose disposal occurs at a much slower rate. This delay in insulin's action may be related to the protracted time for insulin to traverse the capillary endothelium. An increased delay may be associated with the development of insulin resistance. The purpose of the present study was to investigate whether bypassing the transendothelial insulin transport step and injecting insulin directly into the interstitial space would moderate the delay in glucose uptake observed with intravenous administration of the hormone. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Intramuscular injections of saline (n = 3) or insulin (n = 10) were administered directly into the vastus medialis of anesthetized dogs. Injections of 0.3, 0.5, 0.7, 1.0, and 3.0 units insulin were administered hourly during a basal insulin euglycemic glucose clamp (0.2mU · min−1 · kg−1). RESULTS—Unlike the saline group, each incremental insulin injection caused interstitial (lymph) insulin to rise within 10 min, indicating rapid diffusion of the hormone within the interstitial matrix. Delay in insulin action was virtually eliminated, indicated by immediate dose-dependent increments in hindlimb glucose uptake. Additionally, bypassing insulin transport by direct injection into muscle revealed a fourfold greater sensitivity to insulin of in vivo muscle tissue than previously reported from intravenous insulin administration. CONCLUSIONS—Our results indicate that the transport of insulin to skeletal muscle is a rate-limiting step for insulin to activate glucose disposal. Based on these results, we speculate that defects in insulin transport across the endothelial layer of skeletal muscle will contribute to insulin resistance. Experiments were per Continue reading >>

Why Do We Inject Insulin Into Body Fat?

Why Do We Inject Insulin Into Body Fat?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I don't understand how injecting insulin into body fat allows the insulin to get into the bloodstream and lower the blood glucose. I am not on insulin, but Byetta, still an injection. It says not to inject into muscle or veins. I can understand veins, but with you, why fat. However fat cells still have a blood supply, so it might be absorbition rate or something like that. There are some smart people here, maybe someone has an answer. I would think that one reason we inject into fat is because if we injected into a vein, we'd have a lot of dead people. When you inject into a vein, you must get all of the air out of the needle, whereas when you inject into fat, or more accurately, into tissue, any air in the needle won't hurt you, since the insulin is absorbed into the tissue and any air would just be filtered out into the tissue. Of course, if you had air in your injection, that that would mean that you didn't get the full amount of insulin that you needed. Because the capillaries in subcutaneous fat slowly absorb the insulin rather than making it all hit at once. You can accelerate the uptake by hitting a muscle as muscles have much higher blood flows (it also hurts!) Hitting a vein really doesn't matter so much because you tend to go through then rather than into them and they self-seal when you take the needle out so the insulin remains outside the vein. Also your blood pressure is a lot higher than the pressure from the insulin so any leakage tends to be from the vein outwards - bruising is the main result. Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Areas

Insulin Injection Areas

Look at the dark pink areas on these pictures to find areas of the body where insulin is injected. Inject insulin into: The abdomen, but at least 2 in. (5.1 cm) inches from the belly button. The abdomen is the best place to inject insulin, because your abdomen area can absorb insulin most consistently. The top outer area of the thighs. Insulin usually is absorbed more slowly from this site, unless you exercise soon after injecting insulin into your legs. The upper outer area of the arms. The buttocks. Rotate the location of the injection, and slightly change the injection spot each time you inject insulin. Using the same spot every time can form bumps or pits in the skin. For example, inject your insulin above your belly button, then the next time use your upper thigh, then the next time below your belly button. Continue reading >>

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

Everything You Ever Wanted To Know About Injecting Insulin…

But Didn’t Know to Ask Just take your shot. What could be easier, right? Well, you’d be surprised how many errors are made by “veteran” insulin users. It turns out there’s nothing basic about the basics of insulin injections. However, you can improve your technique. This article takes a look at the nitty-gritty details behind successful insulin delivery, why they matter, and how to avoid common pitfalls. The gear Realistically, there are two delivery systems when it comes to injecting insulin: syringes and pens. Yes, there are pumps, but that’s a whole other subject. And yes, there are jet injectors, but they are not widely used. Syringes. The first-ever human insulin shot was delivered by syringe in 1922, and here in the United States, more than half of all insulin is still delivered via syringe. Syringes used to be made of glass, had to be sterilized between uses, and had long, thick, steel surgical needles that could be resharpened on a kitchen whetstone. (No kidding.) But syringes have come a long way since then. Syringes are now disposable, the barrels are made of plastic, and the needles are thin, high-tech, multi-beveled, and coated with lubricants to make them enter the skin smoothly. (Bevels are the slanted surfaces on a needle that create a sharp point.) In the old days, the needle and the syringe were separate components. Nowadays most insulin syringes come with the needle attached. People who use syringes almost always purchase insulin in vials. Vials are glass bottles that generally hold 1,000 units of insulin. Pens. Insulin pens date from the mid-1980s, and while syringes still predominate in the United States, much of the rest of the world has traded in syringes for insulin pens. Pens currently come in two varieties: disposable, prefilled pens Continue reading >>

Can I Inject Insulin Into Muscle?

Can I Inject Insulin Into Muscle?

The latest Q&A from the mailbag of Integrated Diabetes Services. Integrated Diabetes Services provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Each week, the team answers questions from people affected by Type 1 diabetes. Q: Is there any reason not to inject insulin directly into muscle? A: There is really no medical evidence that intramuscular injections are harmful. They hurt more than subcutaneous injections and people need to use sterile syringes to prevent infection, but otherwise this type of injection can speed up insulin action considerably. In fact, absorption occurs twice as fast in most cases. This can be a useful tool for bringing high blood glucose levels down quickly or for avoiding blood sugar spikes when consuming high glycemic meals without a pre-bolus. Have a Question? Insulin-Quiring Minds is a free service of the clinical team at Integrated Diabetes Services LLC. Submit your questions to [email protected] All questions will be answered, and yours may be chosen to appear in Insulin Nation. For more information on Integrated Diabetes Services, call 1-610-642-6055, go to integrateddiabetes.com or write to [email protected] Thanks for reading this Insulin Nation article. Want more Type 1 news? Subscribe here. Have Type 2 diabetes or know someone who does? Try Type 2 Nation, our sister publication. Continue reading >>

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin Injection Sites: Where And How To Inject

Insulin is a hormone that helps cells use glucose (sugar) for energy. It works as a “key,” allowing the sugar to go from the blood and into the cell. In type 1 diabetes, the body doesn’t make insulin. In type 2 diabetes, the body doesn’t use insulin correctly, which can lead to the pancreas not being able to produce enough — or any, depending on the progression of the disease —insulin to meet your body’s needs. Diabetes is normally managed with diet and exercise, with medications, including insulin, added as needed. If you have type 1 diabetes, insulin is required for life. This may seem difficult at first, but you can learn to successfully administer insulin with the support of your healthcare team, determination, and a little practice. There are different ways to take insulin, including syringes, insulin pens, insulin pumps, and jet injectors. Your doctor will help you decide which technique is best for you. Syringes remain a common method of insulin delivery. They’re the least expensive option, and most insurance companies cover them. Syringes Syringes vary by the amount of insulin they hold and the size of the needle. They’re made of plastic and should be discarded after one use. Traditionally, needles used in insulin therapy were 12.7 millimeters (mm) in length. Recent research shows that smaller 8 mm, 6 mm, and 4 mm needles are just as effective, regardless of body mass. This means insulin injection is less painful than it was in the past. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, which means into the fat layer under the skin. In this type of injection, a short needle is used to inject insulin into the fatty layer between the skin and the muscle. Insulin should be injected into the fatty tissue just below your skin. If you inject the insulin deeper int Continue reading >>

Syringes And Insulin Injections

Syringes And Insulin Injections

SugarCat Simon's Web Site - of Feline Diabetes, a Diabetic cat, and the humans who love him Page Index Introduction Syringe Basics Terminology Correct Syringe for Insulin being used Injections Correct Way to Measure Dose Where to Give Injections How to Give an Injection Introduction If you are are afraid of needles you will either get over it very quickly or have a lot of trouble giving your Sugarcat his or her daily insulin injections. I feel that anyone can become comfortable with giving insulin injections, with practice. You just need to know a few pointers and understand the why of it as well as the how of it. I have no problem grabbing a syringe and giving Simon his insulin, but before you think I'm naturally comfortable with needles, let me tell you how I used to be. My earliest memory of getting an injection was my Small Pox vaccination. I was quite young, but I still remember that my Dad had to set down in a chair and put me on his lap and hold me in a tight bear, pinning my arms to my sides, so that the doctor could give me the vaccination. As I grew older, I understood that the various injections for my health, but I still had trouble with them and would never watch the needle going in. Even doing my best to ignore the whole procedure I'd get a little shocky and some times have to put my head down to keep from fainting. When I went in the Navy I overcame some of this (a very little of it) what with all of the injections they give you in boot camp - it seems like hundreds every week. It wasn't until some years latter when a doctor wanted me to have a Glucose Tolerance Test done that I really made an progress. Over the course of some 8 hours they took more than a dozen blood samples. By the time of the last sample, I would not have cared if they had come at me w Continue reading >>

Effects Of Accidental Intramuscular Injection On Insulin Absorption In Iddm.

Effects Of Accidental Intramuscular Injection On Insulin Absorption In Iddm.

Abstract Recent studies have shown that with the injection technique presently recommended to diabetic patients, accidental intramuscular injection of insulin is liable to occur quite frequently. In this study, the simultaneous absorption of 125I-labeled soluble human insulin (5 U) from subcutaneous and intramuscular injection sites in the thigh and abdomen was measured for 3 h in 10 insulin-dependent diabetic subjects to evaluate the importance of accidental intramuscular injection for insulin absorption in the resting state. Injection sites were located with computed tomography of the thigh and abdomen. From a superficial part of the thigh musculature, the absorption rate was at least 50% higher than from the adjacent subcutaneous tissue, the time until 50% of the initial activity remained (t1/2) being 123 +/- 14 and greater than 180 min, respectively (P less than .001). No difference in absorption rates was found between the two tissues in the abdomen (t1/2 84 +/- 6 vs. 93 +/- 7 min, NS). The results suggest that in the thigh, accidental intramuscular injections will considerably increase the variability of insulin absorption and may impair glycemic control in insulin-dependent diabetic patients. Furthermore, the influence of accidental intramuscular injection on insulin absorption seems to vary among injection regions. Continue reading >>

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