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What Happens If A Diabetic Stops Taking Insulin

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

The Truth About Insulin And Type 2 Diabetes

Most people associate taking insulin with type 1 diabetes. However, some people with type 2 diabetes also need to take insulin. We talked with Andrea Penney, RN, CDE, Joslin Diabetes Center, to find out the truth about insulin and type 2 diabetes. Why would someone with type 2 diabetes who has been controlling their diabetes with diet and exercise need to start taking insulin? There are several reasons why someone would require insulin, even if they hadn’t needed it before. Temporary insulin usage– Some people need to take insulin for a short amount of time, because of things like pregnancy, surgery, broken bones, cancer, or steroidal medicines (like Prednisone). Permanent insulin usage - Sometimes the pancreas becomes unable to produce enough insulin. This happens frequently with aging. People can also become insulin resistant due to weight gain or chronic emotional or physical stress. Simply put, pills can no longer control diabetes. So, it’s not usually “bad” behavior that would cause someone to start insulin? Correct. However, non adherence to diet and exercise might result in high blood glucose levels that only insulin can control. Is insulin dosage different for someone who has type 2 rather than type 1? The doses will vary; either type may require very little or a lot of medication. It depends on weight, eating habits, exercise levels, existence of other illnesses and level of insulin resistance. Can someone start taking insulin and then not need to take it anymore? Absolutely! But only for those with type 2 diabetes. Often weight reduction and /or exercise can allow insulin to be stopped. Also, if any of the temporary situations listed above resolve, insulin might be stopped. Continue reading >>

Preparing For Surgery When You Have Diabetes

Preparing For Surgery When You Have Diabetes

Work with your health care provider to come up with the safest surgery plan for you. Focus more on controlling your diabetes during the days to weeks before surgery. Your provider will do a medical exam and talk to you about your health. Tell your provider about all the medicines you are taking. If you take metformin, talk to your provider about stopping it. Sometimes, it can be stopped 48 hours before and 48 hours after surgery to decrease the risk of a problem called lactic acidosis. If you take other types of diabetes drugs, follow your provider's instructions if you need to stop the drug before surgery. If you take insulin, ask your provider what dose you should take the night before or the day of your surgery. Your provider may have you meet with a dietitian, or give you a specific meal and activity plan to try to make sure your blood sugar is well-controlled for the week prior to your surgery. Some surgeons will cancel or delay surgery if your blood sugar is high when you arrive at the hospital for your surgery. Surgery is riskier if you have diabetes complications. So talk to your provider about your diabetes control and any complications you have from diabetes. Tell your provider about any problems you have with your heart, kidneys, or eyes, or if you have loss of feeling in your feet. The provider may run some tests to check the status of those problems. You may do better with surgery and get better faster if your blood sugar is controlled during surgery. So, before surgery, talk to your provider about your blood sugar target level during the days before your operation. During surgery, insulin is given by the anesthesiologist. You will meet with this doctor before surgery to discuss the plan to control your blood sugar during the operation. You or your nurses s Continue reading >>

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

Diabulimia: The Dangerous Way Diabetics Drop Pounds

At age 14, Erin Williams was tired of medicine. Williams was diagnosed as a type 1 diabetic at age 11, and after three years of enduring a never-ending regimen of insulin shots and strict diet restrictions, she was frustrated. Embarrassed by her disease, she kept it a secret from everyone but her closest family and friends. At birthday parties, she made up excuses about why she couldn't have soda or cake. When a classmate saw her drinking juice boxes in the nurses office, she endured weeks of being called the "juice box thief" rather than just tell her classmates she had low blood sugar because of diabetes. Eventually, Williams rebelled the only way she could, she decided not take her insulin. She just didn't want to adhere to the strict diet and medical regimen even though it was vital to her health. "It wasn't this dramatic moment," recalled Williams. "It was mostly like I want to be like everybody else." The next morning when Williams woke up, she felt fine. "Well, nothing bad happened to me," Williams remembered thinking. "It creeps up on you. That's how it does it." Emboldened by her experiment, she continued to restrict her insulin. Without a regimented amount of insulin in her body to process glucose, Williams' body started to burn through fat and muscle. She lost weight very quickly even as she ate all the same foods. Classmates started commenting on her weight loss and remarked that she looked great. "You hear all these things and you're like, 'This is the greatest thing in the world,'" said Williams. "It takes a hold of your life like nothing else." After living with type 1 diabetes for three years, Williams was exhibiting the first signs of a disorder often called diabulimia. The term refers to the dual diagnosis of type 1 diabetes and an eating disorder. Man Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Illness

Diabetes And Illness

It is very important to know how to cope with illness if you have diabetes or know or care for somebody with diabetes. If in doubt, always seek advice from your doctor or nurse straightaway. Any illness or other type of stress will raise your blood sugar (glucose) levels, even if you are off your food or eating less than usual. People with diabetes are unable to produce more insulin to control the glucose level. The increased glucose level can make you become very lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). Acting quickly and following advice helps to keep your glucose levels in the normal range or only slightly high. Because it can sometimes be very difficult to control your blood glucose levels, treatment in hospital may be needed. Hospital treatment may also be needed if you become very dehydrated. What happens to my diabetes when I am unwell? When a person with diabetes is unwell the sugar level in the blood tends to increase. This can happen even with a very mild illness such as the common cold. The blood sugar (glucose) may go up even if you are not eating properly or are being sick (vomiting) or have loose or watery poo (diarrhoea). The increase in blood sugar may make you very lacking in fluid in the body (dehydrated). What should you do when you are unwell? Contact your GP or practice nurse for advice if you are not sure. You may also need treatment for the illness that is making you feel unwell. If you check your blood sugar (glucose) levels then these checks should be more regular. A practice nurse or district nurse can help with checking blood glucose levels, especially if you don't usually check them regularly. Continue eating as normally as possible. If you don't feel like eating, replace your solid food with soup, milk, ice cream, fruit juice, sugar or hon Continue reading >>

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Ask D'mine: Our Lifespan Sans Insulin?

Got questions about navigating life with diabetes? Ask D'Mine! Our weekly advice column, that is — hosted by veteran type 1,diabetes author and educator Wil Dubois. This week, Wil offers some thoughts on that universal question: "How long can I really go without insulin?" Please take a read; his findings might surprise you and even bust a myth or two. But as a precautionary reminder: this topic would fall into the category of "Don't try this at home"! {Got your own questions? Email us at [email protected]} Jake, type 1 from Minneapolis, writes: I've had diabetes for 18 years and I had someone ask me a question the other day that I didn't really have an answer to. The question was how long I would be able to survive without any insulin. I told them 3-4 days, but I don't know if this is true. Any info from a cinnamon whiskey swizzling T1? [email protected] D'Mine answers: If Tom Hanks' character in Castaway had been one of us, he would've never lived long enough to go half-crazy and end up talking to a volleyball named Wilson. OK, so that's a mixed blessing. But I guess the lesson there is: don't get washed up on a deserted island if you can avoid it. To be honest, like you, I had always pegged my zero-insulin survival time in the "couple of days" zone; but once I got to thinking about your question I realized that I didn't know how I knew that, where I learned it, or if it was even correct at all. So I set out to do some fact-checking. Now, as background for you sugar-normals, type 2s, and type 3s—in type 1s like Jake and me, if we run out of insulin hyperglycemia sets in. That leads to diabetic ketoacidosis (known as DKA by its friends), which then (untreated) leads to death. This is old news. But how fast is the process, really? Well, there are a number of variables, Continue reading >>

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Exercising Safely With Diabetes

Regular and safe physical activity is especially important for people with diabetes. Blood Sugar and Exercise The most common concern people have about exercise and diabetes is how to keep their blood sugar levels from getting too high or too low. Here are some general guidelines to follow: Exercise at the same time every day, if possible. This will help you find out how exercise affects your blood sugar. Check your blood sugar before exercising. If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you start to exercise, eat a carbohydrate snack. If your blood sugar is 250 or higher, don't start exercising until your blood sugar level is under 250. Exercise with a friend who knows that you have diabetes and knows how to help if your blood sugar gets too low. Make sure you have ID with you that lets people know you have diabetes. If you're sick or have an infection, don't exercise until you're feeling better. Being sick affects your blood sugar. Taking insulin or diabetes pills to lower blood sugar Blood sugar can go too low (hypoglycemia) during exercise if you take too much insulin, the insulin is absorbed too quickly, or the insulin peaks during exercise. It can also happen if you take insulin or pills and don't eat enough carbohydrate. Here are some things you can do: If your blood sugar is less than 100 before you exercise, eat at least 30 grams of carbohydrate before you begin. This will help keep your blood sugar level from dropping too low during exercise. Bring a carbohydrate snack with you whenever you exercise in case your blood sugar level drops too low during or right after you exercise. If your exercise will last for more than an hour, check your blood sugar after each hour of exercise. If your blood sugar is 100 or less, you should eat a carbohydrate snack. Check y Continue reading >>

What Happens If You Don't Treat Your Diabetes?

What Happens If You Don't Treat Your Diabetes?

How to prevent high blood glucose level complications Diabetes can increase your risk of many serious health problems most of which are entirely preventable if you keep your blood glucose in a healthy range. Eyes - Reduce your risk of developing diabetic retinopathy, glaucoma, cataracts and other eye problems with regular check-ups. Feet - Foot problems can occur when there is nerve damage (also called neuropathy), which results in loss of feeling in your feet. Check your feet for injury and inside your shoes for foreign objects that you might not be able to see at first glance, before you put them on. Contact your healthcare professional if you do have a foot injury. Visit your healthcare professional at least once a year to have a complete foot examination. Stroke or heart attack - having diabetes increases your risk of a stroke or heart attack. You can help to reduce this risk by having regular checks of your blood pressure, cholesterol level and taking all your prescribed medication regularly. Lower your risks You can lower your risk by taking care of your health, by keeping your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol on target with a healthy eating plan, regular physical activity and taking any prescribed medicine or treatment. Diabetes can cause difficulties during pregnancy such as miscarriage or a baby born with problems such as macrosomia/birth trauma, neonatal hypo, hyperbilirubinemia. Women with diabetes are also more likely to have a heart attack, and at a younger age. Some men with diabetes could experience impotence, also called erectile dysfunction this is when the man can no longer have or keep an erection. There are treatments which may help with this. Your healthcare professional is always on hand to help you, with any concerns and symptoms that Continue reading >>

Pancreas And Diabetes: Why Does Pancreas Stop Producing Insulin?

Pancreas And Diabetes: Why Does Pancreas Stop Producing Insulin?

Every part of an individual’s body has its own mechanisms. It is the constant production of hormones that leads to bodily as well as mental changes. This task of generating enzymes and hormones which are required for breaking food down lies with Pancreas. Being an important part of the body, its responsibility is also about producing enough insulin in the body so that the sugar level remains intact. In fact, imbalance in the production of insulin can lead to the health problem called Diabetes. Once the problem starts developing, it can be only controlled by taking suitable diet and by avoiding eating sweets. Let us see what the function of Pancreas is and its contribution towards the development of Diabetes. What is Pancreas and What is it’s Role? Pancreas is an important part of the body, which is positioned behind the lower stomach. It has the ability to produce insulin and glucagon that tends to regulate sugar level in the blood. Carrying out the double functionality of stowing hormones into the blood as well as discharging enzymes through ducts, Pancreas have always held a significant position in controlling hormonal secretion and regulation. A slightest of imbalance in the production of insulin can lead to the problem of diabetes that requires immense care in dealing with dietary management. Playing an essential part in the endocrine as well as exocrine systems, pancreas has exceptional functional system. Basically, the endocrine system is aimed at the production of chemicals as well as hormones in the body. On the other hand, exocrine system constitutes of glands in the body that tends to release saliva, sweat and digestive enzymes. As known to all, the role of Pancreas is to produce adequate amount of insulin for regulating the level of sugar in the body. The Continue reading >>

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

7 Scary Things That Can Happen When You Don't Treat Your Diabetes

Swallowing pills, checking your blood sugar all the time, or sticking yourself with needles full of insulin probably doesn't sound like your idea of a good time. But taking steps to keep your diabetes under control is your best shot at preventing a slew of frightening complications. If you don't take care of yourself, "diabetes complications typically start within 5 years; within 10 to 15 years, the majority of patients will progress to have multiple health issues," says Betul Hatipoglu, MD, an endocrinologist at Cleveland Clinic. Fortunately, eating a nutritious diet, exercising, and taking your medication may not only stop complications from progressing, but can also reverse them, she says. Need motivation to stick to your treatment plan? Here's what can happen when you slack off. With type 1 diabetes, your body stops producing insulin, a hormone that regulates blood sugar; with type 2 diabetes, your body can't properly use the insulin you do produce. In turn, your HDL (or "good") cholesterol lowers, and your levels of harmful blood fats called triglycerides rise. Insulin resistance also contributes to hardened, narrow arteries, which in turn increases your blood pressure. As a result, about 70% of people with either type of diabetes also have hypertension—a risk factor for stroke, heart disease, and trouble with thinking and memory. (Add these 13 power foods to your diet to help lower blood pressure naturally.) Failing to control high blood pressure and high cholesterol, either with diet and exercise alone or by adding medications, accelerates the rate at which all your other complications progress, says Robert Gabbay, MD, PhD, chief medical officer at Joslin Diabetes Center in Boston. More than 4 million people with diabetes have some degree of retinopathy, or dam Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Insulin

Diabetes & Insulin

If you’ve been diagnosed with diabetes, you are certainly not alone. Diabetes affects more than 29 million people in the United States and approximately 415 million people worldwide. Although diabetes is a very common diagnosis, managing your disease is a very personal experience. Learning about your diabetes and treatment options such as insulin can help. Diabetes is a disease where your blood sugar can be higher than normal. When you have diabetes: Your pancreas makes little, not enough, or no insulin, or Your body prevents the insulin you do make from working correctly As a result, sugar can’t get into your cells, so it stays in your blood. This causes your blood sugar to stay too high (also called hyperglycemia). Both high and low blood sugar can result in serious complications. That’s why controlling your blood sugar is an essential part of managing your diabetes. Follow your health care provider's recommendation about the best time of day to check your blood sugar. Once you get a little practice checking your blood sugar, it will become part of your routine. No compatible source was found for this video. What are the symptoms of diabetes? If you have diabetes, you may have some or all of these symptoms: Increased thirst and hunger Frequent urination Weight loss Blurry vision Feeling tired You may also have problems with: Scrapes or bruises healing slower than usual Tingling or numbness in the limbs Or you may have no symptoms at all. What are the types of diabetes? Your health care provider may have spoken with you about your type of diabetes, but you may not know about the other types. Some of the types of diabetes are: Type 1 diabetes. In type 1 diabetes, the body makes little or no insulin. People with this type of diabetes must take insulin every day. Ty Continue reading >>

Starvation Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

Starvation Can Cure Type 2 Diabetes

A new study shows that starvation (eating 600 kcal/day) can cure type 2-diabetes, just like gastric bypass surgery. Again, there is no need to explain the effect of the surgery with other speculative theories. The resulting starvation reverses diabetes. And the starvation isn’t even necessary to do that. Guardian: Low-calorie diet offers hope of cure for type 2 diabetes Unnecessary starvation If a type 2 diabetic stops eating (carbs) the symptoms of diabetes starts to go away. But starvation or surgery are unnecessarily painful ways to do it. Luckily diabetics can eat real food to satiety, as long as they avoid sugar and starch. The food that quickly turns into simple sugars in the gut. Cutting away their stomach or starving themselves is not necessary. All they need is good food. More Across the river for water: Surgery for diabetes PS A Gastric Bypass operation protects from eating too much carbohydrates in two ways. Number one: you can only eat miniature portions of anything. Number two: the smaller amounts of starch you eat is not digestedd as easily as the duodenum with the starch-digesting enzyme amylase is diverted from direct contact with the food. Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The Effects Of Stopping Metformin

The medication metformin is a drug in the biguanide family that is used to treat type 2 or adult-onset diabetes mellitus. Drugs.com notes that metformin is often the first prescribed medication for individuals with type 2 diabetes and may also be used in combination with other diabetes medications or insulin. This medication is sold under the brand name Glucophage, Glucophage XR and Fortamet. Metformin helps to reduce glycemic or sugar levels in the blood in a number of ways. If an individual with type 2 diabetes stops taking metformin, they may experience serious immediate and long-term effects of uncontrolled high levels of blood glucose. Video of the Day A primary mode of action of metformin is increasing the sensitivity of the body’s muscles, tissues and cells to insulin--a hormone that is essential for transporting glucose from the blood to the body. Drugs.com notes that individuals with type 2 diabetes have insulin resistance. This causes the cells to ignore the effects of insulin and not allow glucose to be transported into the muscles and tissues where it is vital to produce energy. The body tries to compensate by secreting more insulin, which only leads to hyperinsulinemia in the blood. If a patient stops taking metformin, the type 2 diabetes effects occur due to insulin resistance causing symptoms such as severe thirst, hunger and urinary frequency. The chronic levels of hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia also contribute to diseases of the heart and vascular-blood vessel-system. Gluconeogenesis is the production of glucose by the liver. A storage supply of glucose is reserved in the liver and released into the bloodstream when the body requires energy due to stress or hunger. The MayoClinic.com notes that another one of the mechanisms of metformin to reduce Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

People with type 2 diabetes do not always have to take insulin right away; that is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. The longer someone has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will require insulin. Just as in type 1 diabetes, insulin is a way to control your blood glucose level. With type 2 diabetes, though, dietary changes, increasing physical activity, and some oral medications are usually enough to bring your blood glucose to a normal level. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. There are several reasons people with type 2 diabetes may want to use insulin: It can quickly bring your blood glucose level down to a healthier range. If your blood glucose level is excessively high when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the doctor may have you use insulin to lower your blood glucose level—in a way that’s much faster than diet and exercise. Insulin will give your body a respite; it (and especially the beta cells that produce insulin) has been working overtime to try to bring down your blood glucose level. In this scenario, you’d also watch what you eat and exercise, but having your blood glucose under better control may make it easier to adjust to those lifestyle changes. It has fewer side effects than some of the medications: Insulin is a synthetic version of a hormone our bodies produce. Therefore, it interacts with your body in a more natural way than medications do, leading to fewer side effects. The one side effect is hypoglycemia. It can be cheaper. Diabetes medications can be expensive, although there is an array of options that try to cater to people of all economic levels. However, insulin is generally cheaper than medications (on a monthly basis), especially if the doctor wants yo Continue reading >>

What Are The Consequences If A Patient Stops Taking Insulin In Type 1 Diabetes And Is Type 1 Is Curable?

What Are The Consequences If A Patient Stops Taking Insulin In Type 1 Diabetes And Is Type 1 Is Curable?

Thank you for A2A. I guess I am qualified enough to answer having worked at the treatment of T1D for almost 1.5 years. TLDR : There are adverse effects of insulin weaning. There is no cure of T1D yet. But we do have promising treatments under Phase 2 and 3 clinical trials (later stages of drug development) so there is hope. We might see a successful drug in coming decade. Animesh Agrawal has covered etiology (the cause of disease) very well. I will add a few things here. You are not alone : Type 1 or juvenile diabetes affects approximately 70,000 children under the age of 15 every year and around 3.2 million people in the world die due to diabetes or its related causes per year. We don’t know our enemy and hence winning it is difficult : Type I diabetes is an autoimmune disorder (our defence mechanism offends our body) and it may develop at any age. Incomplete understanding of the mechanism of disease development and progression prevents the development of any rationally designed drug. The reasons of T1D are varied and include susceptible genes , enterovirus infection, etc. Presently the treatment involves insulin administration by injection or pump. Both are invasive methods, painful enough and hence non-compliance is usually observed in patients. The present treatment is also an economic burden to patients. Consequences of stopping Insulin in T1D : In layman terms there can be following, Preliminary symptoms: Fever, headache, gastrointestinal disorders, reduction in weight Symptoms in longer run: metabolic disorders, vulnerability to other diseases But these are very generalised, symptoms depend on age group and other factors like gender, extent of destruction of beta cells (cells that make insulin in body). See Nandan Karn 's answer for details. Treatment : Insulin Continue reading >>

About Gliclazide

About Gliclazide

Gliclazide is a medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is an illness where the body doesn't make enough insulin, or the insulin that is made doesn't work properly. This causes high blood sugar levels. Gliclazide lowers your blood sugar by increasing the amount of insulin your body produces. Gliclazide is available on prescription. It comes as tablets. Key facts Gliclazide works by increasing the amount of insulin that your body makes. Insulin is the hormone that controls the level of sugar in your blood. If you take gliclazide once a day, it's best to take it in the morning with breakfast. Gliclazide can sometimes make your blood sugar level too low (hypoglycaemia). Carry some sweets or fruit juice with you to help when this happens. Gliclazide may make you put on weight. Gliclazide may also be called by the brand names Bilxona, Dacadis, Diamicron, Laaglyda, Nazdol, Vamju, Vitile, Ziclaseg, and Zicron. Who can and can't take gliclazide Gliclazide is only for adults. Do not give this medicine to children under 18 years. Gliclazide isn't suitable for some people. Tell your doctor before starting the medicine if you: have had an allergic reaction to gliclazide or any other medicines in the past have severe kidney or liver disease have a rare illness called porphyria are taking miconazole (a treatment for fungal infections) are breastfeeding have an illness called G6PD-deficiency need to have surgery How and when to take it The dose of gliclazide can vary. Take this medicine as prescribed by your doctor. Swallow your gliclazide tablets whole with a glass of water, do not chew them. Different types of gliclazide tablets Gliclazide comes as 2 different types of tablets - normal (standard-release) and long-acting (slow-release). Standard-release tablets releas Continue reading >>

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