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What Foods Help Lower A1c?

How To Lower A1c Levels

How To Lower A1c Levels

Reader Approved A1C is a form of glucose in the body that is regularly measured in people who suffer from type 1 and type 2 diabetes. A1C is generally used to determine a diabetic’s average blood sugar levels from previous months, and can aid healthcare providers in prescribing and recommending treatments to those with diabetes. A1C levels can generally be lowered by practicing healthy living, including adhering to proper nutrition, exercising regularly, and managing stress. 1 Add a higher number of fruits and vegetables to your diet. Fruits and vegetables contain a number of antioxidants that promote better health in general, and are also high in fiber, which studies have shown can contribute to better blood sugar management.[1] 2 Eat more beans and legumes. According to Harvard University Health Services, one-half cup (118 ml) of beans will provide you with one-third of your daily fiber requirement. Beans will also slow down the digestion process, and help stabilize blood sugar levels following meals.[2] 3 Consume more fat-free milk and yogurt. Fat-free milk and yogurt are rich in calcium and vitamin D, which have been shown to contribute to better blood sugar management and weight loss, the latter of which can help improve most cases of type 2 diabetes. 4 Increase your intake of nuts and fish. Most nuts and fatty fish including tuna, mackerel, and salmon contain omega-3 fatty acids that will help lower insulin resistance, regulate blood sugar levels, and contribute to better heart health. Nuts can also benefit type 2 diabetics who are trying to lower their cholesterol levels. 5 Spice your food with cinnamon. Although cinnamon is generally associated with sweets and desserts, research has shown that consuming one-half tsp. (2 ml) cinnamon per day can improve insulin Continue reading >>

5 Foods That Lower Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Diabetes

5 Foods That Lower Hemoglobin A1c Levels In Diabetes

Our diet plays a vital role in controlling our blood sugar levels. The A1C test is a blood test based on the attachment of glucose to hemoglobin that provides data about a person’s average levels of blood glucose over a three-month period. The A1C test is the primary test used for diabetes management.1 Before we can tackle the problem, we must understand what causes the increase in A1C levels. The prime cause behind rising A1C levels are the carbohydrates and sugar in our diet. By controlling these, we can prevent the increase of A1C level. Here are specific foods that will help you lower A1C levels. 1. Fruits Drinking fruit juice and eating whole fruits is not the same. Eating fresh, whole fruits instead of juices can prevent your blood sugar from shooting up. Whole fruits contain fiber, which helps in reducing the rate at which your body absorbs the sugar. In the case of fruit juices, all the fiber content is lost and the sugar in the fruit directly enters the bloodstream. Moreover, fiber in the fruits take longer to digest and that prevents you from feeling hungry quickly. This results in you eating less. Most fruits, like apples, for instance, have high fiber content and are useful in controlling blood sugar. Melons such as muskmelon, cantaloupe, watermelon, and honeydew are rich sources of potassium, anti-oxidants, vitamin C, and folate. 2. Vegetables Vegetables are rich in many minerals, fiber, vitamins, anti-oxidants, polyphenols, and compounds that help lower blood sugar, A1C and inflammation. A diet comprising fresh organic veggies can transform our health positively. Consume more of the vegetables that grow above the ground like cucumber, lettuce, spinach, carrots, zucchini, asparagus, tomato, green beans, broccoli, brussels sprout, cabbage, red onions, Asia Continue reading >>

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

How To Lower Your A1c Levels: A Healthful Guide

An A1C blood test measures average blood sugar levels over the past 2 to 3 months. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend the use of A1C tests to help diagnose cases of prediabetes, type 1, and type 2 diabetes. A1C tests are also used to monitor diabetes treatment plans. What is an A1C test? An A1C test measures how well the body is maintaining blood glucose levels. To do this, an A1C test averages the percentage of sugar-bound hemoglobin in a blood sample. When glucose enters the blood, it binds to a red blood cell protein called hemoglobin. The higher blood glucose levels are, the more hemoglobin is bound. Red blood cells live for around 4 months, so A1C results reflect long-term blood glucose levels. A1C tests are done using blood obtained by a finger prick or blood draw. Physicians will usually repeat A1C tests before diagnosing diabetes. Initial A1C tests help physicians work out an individual's baseline A1C level for later comparison. How often A1C tests are required after diagnosis varies depending on the type of diabetes and management factors. Lowering A1C levels Many studies have shown that lowering A1C levels can help reduce the risk or intensity of diabetes complications. With type 1 diabetes, more controlled blood glucose levels are associated with reduced rates of disease progression. With type 2 diabetes, more controlled A1C levels have also been shown to reduce symptoms affecting the small arteries and nerves in the body. This influences eyesight and pain while decreasing complications. Long-term studies have also shown that early and intensive blood glucose control can reduce cardiovascular complications in people with type 1 or 2 diabetes. Even small changes in A1C levels can have big effects. The ADA recommend that maintaining fair control Continue reading >>

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

5 Things That Helped Me Improve My A1c

This article is intended for people with diabetes who take insulin and monitor their blood sugars frequently with blood glucose tests and/or with continuous glucose monitors. (NOTE: If you’re struggling mentally with the pressure of improving your A1C results, read this article from a physician who realized just how emotional A1C measurements can be for her patients: Ending the A1C Blame Game.) Your A1c is a simple blood test will tell you an approximation of your blood sugar control for the past 3 months based on the amount of Advanced Glycogenated End-Products (AGEs) that have accumulated in your blood. You can read more about A1Cs here. When I was a college student through to my early 20s, my A1C hovered between 6.8 to 7.3, but as I’ve gotten older and become and more and more engrossed in health, nutrition, planning for optimal pregnancy, and overall commitment to my diabetes, I’ve set my sights on reducing my A1C to a level near 6.0 percent. You can read what these percentages translate to in blood glucose levels with this chart to the right. —> My most recent A1Cs were 6.8, then 6.4, and most recently 5.9. At last, I’ve reached my goal! But this was no accident. In addition to regularly fine-tuning my insulin doses and wearing a CGM, here are 5 things that helped me lower my A1C…that might help you: Change what I view in my head as an “okay” blood sugar. For me, I feel this has the biggest part of my progress. It’s easy (and understandable) in type 1 diabetes to see a blood sugar of 145 or 150 mg/dL as a decent blood level to “hang out” at throughout the day. In reality, if this is often your average blood sugar, then your A1C will inevitably be around 7.0 percent. Which is considered healthy for long-term health in diabetes management, certa Continue reading >>

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

Amazingly Easy Ways To Lower Your A1c

What if there were a magical “lower your A1c” wand? You just pull it out, swoop it over your head (or your pancreas) and… voila! A1c lowered. If only it were that simple. Focusing on eeking down that ever shifting number can be one of the most frustrating things a person living with diabetes has to do. But here is some good news: while there may not be a magic wand, there are some pretty simple, pretty cool fixes to help you on your way to lower your A1c. Kick it old school: Remember those bulky paper logbooks we all used to lug around? Yeah, well there’s something about them that just works. Going back to actually logging blood sugars, meals and doses can really help a person lower an A1c. Why? Because while it’s great to have tools that automatically upload to our medical team (and our computers), writing things down forces us to face them more, study them more and yes, not ignore them. (A cool side trick: use one of those pens with four colors of ink in it. Write all of your in range numbers in green, your high numbers in blue and your low numbers in red. Use the black for notes. With this, you can look at a logbook page and the patterns will jump out at you.) Ramp it up new school: Never used a CGM? Or haven’t used it in a while? CGM’s are a great way to help you lower your A1c, says Regina Shirley, RD, LDN and person with diabetes. “I make a commitment with my CGM. I will wear it religiously until I can get my A1c back to where I like it. It is not as easy as it may seem to remember to check blood sugars, and inserting yet one more device in your body adds on time to your diabetes care regimen that you would rather spend doing something else. However, when you know you need to get in better control, either to help with such things as pregnancy prepa Continue reading >>

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

Secrets To Lowering Your A1c — A Diabetic Health Coach Gives Us The Scoop

As a Diabetic Health coach, the majority of my clients come to me looking for help to lower their A1C. Being a Type 1 diabetic for fifteen years, I understand that a lower A1C is more than just a number. It’s about getting control of your life. When I was diagnosed at seven years old, I was extremely fortunate to have parents that took really great care of me. I remember growing up with my dad telling me, “Out of all the report cards you will ever bring home, your A1C report is the most important one!” The majority of my childhood I had a decent A1C that averaged in the mid 7’s. It was never terrible, but it was always a goal of mine to get it as low as possible to reduce future complications. When I went off to college and became more independent, things changed. While most kids were partying and eating fast food at 2 a.m., I was playing Division 1 soccer, and knew that if I wanted to perform my best, I needed to feel my best. Through self-education and attending the Institute for Integrative Nutrition after college, I started implementing tools for both my mind and body which helped me become healthier and more in control of my diabetes. Today, I want to share with you how I lowered my A1C from a 7.5 to a 5.7, and became the healthiest and happiest I have ever been. If you want tighter control of your blood sugar numbers, start by looking at your level of satisfaction in these 5 areas: 1 – Organization I find that organization makes life with diabetes less overwhelming. Every Sunday night I plan out my week. I write down days, times, and details for food shopping, morning meditation, workouts, pump set changes, appointments, and meal prepping. When I’m organized from day to day, I have more energy to focus on my diabetes control. This also empowers me both Continue reading >>

How To Reduce A1c

How To Reduce A1c

Do you visit websites looking for information only to find a whole lot of rubbish and not much practical information? For example, when I decided to write this post I searched the web for ‘How to lower a1c' and I found articles like this that give you 10 pages of seemingly useless information. For starters those sites where you have to click to the next page to read one paragragh really annoy me. And if I read that post I'd be even more confused! So our goal here at Diabetes Meal Plans is to cut through the crap and confusion and give you practical strategies that REALLY get results. So let's tackle today's reader question: My A1c is high and I need help or suggestions to lower it. I'm feeling so frustrated, please help?! In this post I am going to cover how to reduce a1c but just remember if you have a question, you can submit it over here and we'll answer it in a post. What is A1c? I covered this in detail in another post over here. But the short of it is that A1c is a blood test that is done to reflect your average blood sugar levels over the past 2-3 months. The thing to understand here is what is raising the A1c level, it's sugar/ carbohydrates! A process called glycosylation occurs where sugars (glucose) in your blood stream attach to hemoglobin. The average red blood cell lives for around 3 months, so when they are doing the a1c blood test they are testing glycated hemoglobin. What's affecting this result the most? Sugar/ carbohydrate intake…so that's where you need to start. How To Lower A1c? Essentially you lower your a1c the same as you lower your blood glucose, through diet, exercise, and lifestyle. Cut the carbs If it's sugar/ carbs that influence a1c the most, then it makes sense to cut the carbs, right? So one of the best ways to lower a1c is to cut ba Continue reading >>

Foods To Lower A1c – How To Lower A1c

Foods To Lower A1c – How To Lower A1c

Foods To Lower A1C – How To Lower A1C How to lower a1c? The questios arises in everyone’s mind. Foods to lower a1c levels naturally is a list which would help you immensely. If you suffer from diabetes, with high A1c levels consider what you eat is one of the most important things that will help keep you healthy. Foods to lower a1c are very effective foods. The main thing is that you want to avoid blood sugar spikes. Sweets and sugary sodas, They can be dangerous as the body absorbs these sugars instantly.However, the good news is that there are many foods out there that can actually help in a natural way to lower A1c levels. Natural way to lower A1c – List of Foods To Lower A1C Broccoli Broccoli contains a compound called sulforaphane. This naturally occurring substance, when eaten, will allow an anti-inflammatory process to begin which helps to lower A1c levels naturally. This substance also helps protect blood vessels from heart disease which is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes. This substance also helps protect blood vessels from heart disease which is a leading cause of death in people with diabetes. Chocolate Chocolate is good for me!!! Yes in moderation but stick to Dark Chocolate. It is full of flavonoids which have shown to reduce insulin resistance, lower a1c levels fast and keep cravings at bay. Tests have shown that people who consume dark chocolate consume less fat and carbohydrates. Tests have shown that people who consume dark chocolate consume less fat and carbohydrates. Blueberries Blueberries contain both insoluble fiber (helps to get rid of fat in your system) but also soluble fiber which helps to lower A1c levels naturally by slowing down the emptying of the stomach. There is also a natural hormone in the berries which helps reg Continue reading >>

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

5 Ways To Lower Your A1c

For some, home blood sugar testing can be an important and useful tool for managing your blood sugar on a day-to-day basis. Still, it only provides a snapshot of what’s happening in the moment, not long-term information, says Gregory Dodell, MD, assistant clinical professor of medicine, endocrinology, diabetes, and bone disease at Mount Sinai Health System in New York City. For this reason, your doctor may occasionally administer a blood test that measures your average blood sugar level over the past two to three months. Called the A1C test, or the hemoglobin A1C test, this provides a more accurate picture of how well your type 2 diabetes management plan is working. Taking the A1C Test If your diabetes is well controlled and your blood sugar levels have remained stable, the American Diabetes Association recommends that you have the A1C test two times each year. This simple blood draw can be done in your doctor's office. Some doctors can use a point-of-care A1C test, where a finger stick can be done in the office, with results available in about 10 minutes. The A1C test results provide insight into how your treatment plan is working, and how it might be modified to better control the condition. Your doctor may want to run the test as often as every three months if your A1C is not within your target range. What the A1C Results Mean The A1C test measures the glucose (blood sugar) in your blood by assessing the amount of what’s called glycated hemoglobin. “Hemoglobin is a protein within red blood cells. As glucose enters the bloodstream, it binds to hemoglobin, or glycates. The more glucose that enters the bloodstream, the higher the amount of glycated hemoglobin,” Dr. Dodell says. An A1C level below 5.7 percent is considered normal. An A1C between 5.7 and 6.4 perce Continue reading >>

Food That Lower A1c In Diabetes

Food That Lower A1c In Diabetes

The A1C level is the percentage of your red cells that have sugar molecules attached to them. It is also referred to as glycated hemoglobin, glycosylated hemoglobin, hemoglobin A1C and HbA1c. Your doctor can measure you A1C number with a blood test to determine your average blood sugar levels over the past two or three months. A normal A1C level falls between 4 and 6 percent. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, you should strive to keep your A1C number below 7 percent. Eating right can help you do that. Video of the Day Control carbohydrates, fatty foods and calories by limiting your intake of potatoes, rice, noodles and foods containing white flour. Pass up sugary desserts, candy, ice cream, soft drinks and store-bought cookies, pies, baked goods and doughnuts. Avoid fried chicken, frozen dinners, lunch meats, sugared soft drinks and flavored water, store-bought smoothies and fruit drinks, milk shakes, frozen pizza, and restaurant french fries, hamburgers, pizza and chicken and fish sandwiches. All of these foods can raise your A1C levels, particularly if you have diabetes. Vegetables provide vitamins, minerals, protein, anti-oxidants and fiber to help balance your blood glucose levels. Eat plenty of asparagus, beans, broccoli, carrots, red onions, spinach, tomatoes and soy as tofu or in soy milk products. A great source of omega-3 fatty acids, flaxseed as an oil or nutty seed can be incorporated into salads, breads, cereals and dressings. Nuts are an excellent source of cholesterol-lowering plant sterols but are high in calories. So eat them in moderation. Blueberries, cranberries and red grapefruit can lower your LDL cholesterol and promote heart health. Grapefruit can interfere with some medications, so check with your doctor before adding grapefruit to your diet Continue reading >>

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

6 Ways To Lower Your A1c Level

Diabetes is a serious, chronic disease that can lead to many complications. When managed properly, diabetes does not have to control your life or ruin your health. Getting tested, especially if you are at risk for developing type 2 diabetes, is a proactive measure you can take for yourself and your future. In the early stages of diabetes, there are no symptoms. An early diagnosis helps you get treatment before complications occur. The A1C test is a blood test that checks for type 2 diabetes. It is also used to see how well you are managing your diabetes if you have already been diagnosed. The test provides information about a person’s average levels of blood sugar over a two- to three-month period. The number is reported in the form of a percentage. The higher the percentage, the higher your average blood glucose levels are, and the higher your risk for either diabetes or related complications. A1C is one of the primary tests used for diabetes diagnosis and management. It can test for type 1 and type 2 diabetes, but it can’t test for gestational diabetes. It can also be used to predict the likelihood that someone will get diabetes. The A1C test measures how much glucose, or sugar, is attached to hemoglobin, the protein in red blood cells. The more glucose attached, the higher the A1C. This test is groundbreaking, as it 1) doesn’t require fasting, 2) gives a picture of blood sugar levels over a period of days and weeks instead of at just one point in time like fasting sugars, and 3) can be done at any time of day. This makes it easier to administer and easier to make accurate diagnoses. According to the National Institutes of Health, a normal A1C is below 5.7 percent. If your score is between 5.7 and 6.4 percent, the diagnosis is prediabetes. Having prediabetes put Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower A1c

Foods That Lower A1c

Type 2 Diabetes is essentially a disease of poor lifestyle and dietary habits. Thus, logically this is the condition that can be either prevented, stopped or even partially reversed in many cases just through lifestyle modification and dietary measures.Therefore dietary modifications have to be an essential part of any anti-diabetic program (Fowler, 2007). A1c is the measure of glucose associated with hemoglobin; it shows how well the person is controlling his or her sugar level in blood for last 8 to 12 weeks(Practitioners, n.d.). Thus it is not something that can be brought down overnight, but rather through consistent efforts over the time. Carbohydrates, Glycemic Index, and Glycemic Load Before planning a diet plan that helps to bring down blood sugar we got to know some basics. We get most of our energy needs through carbohydrates, which are converted to glucose. Carbohydrates are essential to meet our energy needs. To avoid the high sugar levels in the blood, we have to take the diet which is low in glycemic index, and preferably low in glycemic load. So the question arises that what is glycemic index and glycemic load? Understanding glycemic index and glycemic load are essential for dietary planning and choosing right kind of food products in diabetics. Glycemic index is measured on the scale of 0 to 100; it tells us how quickly the given food will raise our blood sugar (glucose) after ingestion.Thus foods with higher glycemic index are harmful, and foods with lower glycemic index are right as they only slowly get absorbed and do not raise our blood glucose level in a sharp manner(“About Glycemic Index,” n.d.).Whereas Glycemic Load tell us about the amount of sugar (glucose) in any food, lower glycemic load means lower sugar in a portion of the product(“Gly Continue reading >>

Lowering A1c Levels Naturally

Lowering A1c Levels Naturally

Call it what you will: hemoglobin A1C, glycosylated hemoglobin, HbA1c, or just “A1C,” this number plays a huge role in how your diabetes is managed. It’s also used to diagnose diabetes, as well as prediabetes. Your A1C is a blood test that provides information about your average blood sugar levels over the past three months. Your provider and diabetes care team use this number to gauge how things are going and if and how to tweak your diabetes treatment plan. For most people who have diabetes, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends an A1C of less than 7%. The American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists (AACE) advises a tighter goal of 6.5% or lower. Your goal may be completely different, and that’s OK (just make sure you know what it is!). Why lower your A1C? A1C goals aren’t decided upon out of thin air. The targets that the ADA, AACE, or your provider advise for you are based on clinical research, as well as other factors, such as your age, your overall health, and your risk of hypoglycemia. Landmark clinical trials, such as the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial (DCCT) and Epidemiology of Diabetes Interventions and Complications (EDIC), for example, have correlated lowering A1C with a decrease in diabetes-related complications. So, for every one point that you lower your A1C, you’ll lower your complication risk as follows: • Eye disease by 76% • Nerve damage by 60% • Heart attack or stroke by 57% • Kidney disease by 50% It’s important to realize that your A1C reflects an average of your blood sugar numbers. Your A1C might be 6.7%, but that may be because you’re having a lot of low blood sugars, for example. For this reason, your A1C should be viewed as part of the picture, and not in isolation. Your blood sugar readings Continue reading >>

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

5 Simple Ways To Lower Your A1c This Week

The A1C blood test is a simple test that analyzes your glucose (blood sugar) levels by measuring the amount of glycated hemoglobin in your blood. Hemoglobin is a protein in your red blood cells; when glucose enters the blood, it attaches to the hemoglobin. The result is glycated hemoglobin. The more glucose in your blood, the higher your glycated hemoglobin. The A1C is a valuable indicator of how well your diabetes management plan is working. While your individual A1C goal will depend on factors including your age and your personal medical profile, most people with diabetes aim to keep their A1C below 7 percent. By keeping your A1C number within your target range, you can reduce the risk of diabetes complications. While it is important to develop a long-term diabetes management plan with your physician, there are several steps you can take right away to help reduce your A1C. Small changes add up, so consider trying some of these strategies to lower your A1C this week. 1. Try Short Sessions of High Intensity Exercise According to research presented at the American Heart Association's Scientific Sessions 2015, type 2 diabetes patients who did 10 minutes of exercise three times a day, five days a week at 85 percent of their target heart rate had a twofold improvement in A1C levels compared to patients who exercised for 30 minutes a day at 65 percent of their target heart rate. Be sure to check with your doctor before trying high intensity exercise, and wear a heart rate monitor so you don’t overdo it. 2. Shrink Your Dinner Plate Instead of a large dinner plate for your meals, use a smaller salad plate. This simple swap can trick your eyes and brain into thinking you’re eating more than you really are, and you’ll feel satisfied with less food. It’s especially helpfu Continue reading >>

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