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What Does It Mean For An Insulin To Peak?

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Types Of Insulin For Diabetes Treatment

Many forms of insulin treat diabetes. They're grouped by how fast they start to work and how long their effects last. The types of insulin include: Rapid-acting Short-acting Intermediate-acting Long-acting Pre-mixed What Type of Insulin Is Best for My Diabetes? Your doctor will work with you to prescribe the type of insulin that's best for you and your diabetes. Making that choice will depend on many things, including: How you respond to insulin. (How long it takes the body to absorb it and how long it remains active varies from person to person.) Lifestyle choices. The type of food you eat, how much alcohol you drink, or how much exercise you get will all affect how your body uses insulin. Your willingness to give yourself multiple injections per day Your age Your goals for managing your blood sugar Afrezza, a rapid-acting inhaled insulin, is FDA-approved for use before meals for both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. The drug peaks in your blood in about 15-20 minutes and it clears your body in 2-3 hours. It must be used along with long-acting insulin in people with type 1 diabetes. The chart below lists the types of injectable insulin with details about onset (the length of time before insulin reaches the bloodstream and begins to lower blood sugar), peak (the time period when it best lowers blood sugar) and duration (how long insulin continues to work). These three things may vary. The final column offers some insight into the "coverage" provided by the different insulin types in relation to mealtime. Type of Insulin & Brand Names Onset Peak Duration Role in Blood Sugar Management Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) 15-30 min. 30-90 min 3-5 hours Rapid-acting insulin covers insulin needs for meals eaten at the same time as the injection. This type of insulin is often used with Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about 12 hours or longer, so it can be used overnight. It begins to work within one to four hours, Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Types Of Insulin And How They Work

Insulin is a hormone the body makes to control the level of glucose (sugar) in the blood. It lowers blood sugar by allowing glucose to leave the bloodstream and enter body cells. Without enough insulin, the level of glucose in the bloodstream can become too high. Everyone needs insulin to use food properly. People without diabetes make enough of their own insulin to keep their blood sugar at healthy levels all the time. People with type 1 diabetes no longer make insulin of their own. Instead, they need to take shots of one or more types of insulin to keep their blood sugars close to normal. Between 75 and 90 percent of people with type 2 diabetes need to take insulin shots to help them get the best control of their blood sugar levels. Deciding How Much Insulin to Take The amount of insulin a person needs depends on: Body weight Percentage of body fat Activity level Diet Other medicines Emotions and stress General health Type of insulin When you first start taking insulin shots, your doctor might ask you to change the amount you take or the time you take it several times. You and your doctor will base these changes on the results of your blood sugar tests. You'll need to make adjustments until you find the dose and schedule that work best for you. Each person's need for insulin is different: Some people can control their blood sugar with one shot of insulin a day. Most people need more than three shots every day. Many people need more than one type of insulin. If you take several insulin shots a day or use more than one type of insulin, it doesn't mean your diabetes isn't in good control. Your blood sugar, not the amount or type of insulin you take, is the best way to judge how well you are doing. If you take three shots a day and your blood sugar is near normal, that's Continue reading >>

Insulin Action

Insulin Action

Insulin is a medicine that lowers blood glucose (sugar). There are several types of insulin. Each type of insulin has a certain time period in which it works. In order to understand insulin action, it is helpful to know the onset, peak and duration of the insulin you take. Onset refers to when the insulin starts to work. Peak refers to when the insulin works hardest. Duration refers to how long the insulin works. You are more likely to have a low blood glucose when your insulin is peaking, during periods of increased physical activity or if you are eating less food. If you are having problems with low blood glucose, talk to your healthcare provider about adjusting your insulin. Usual Action Times of Insulin PRODUCT WHEN TO TAKE ONSET PEAK DURATION Rapid-Acting Lispro (Humalog) Aspart (Novolog) Glulisine (Apidra) 0-15 min before meal 10-30 min 30 min - 3 hours 3-5 hours Short-Acting Regular (R) Human 30 min before meal 30-60 min 2-5 hours Up to 12 hours Intermediate-Acting NPH (N) Human Does not need to be given with meal 90 min - 4 hours 4-12 hours Up to 24 hours Long Acting Glargine (Lantus) Detemir (Levemir) Does not need to be given with meal 45 min - 4 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Continue reading >>

How To Use Long-acting Insulin: Types, Frequency, Peak Times, And Duration

How To Use Long-acting Insulin: Types, Frequency, Peak Times, And Duration

Long-acting insulin can help to stabilize blood sugar levels throughout the day, with only one or two shots. Fast-acting insulin replaces the surge of insulin that a healthy pancreas would release at mealtime. In contrast, long-acting insulin mimics the low-level flow of insulin normally released between meals and overnight. In this way, long-acting insulin works to establish a healthy baseline blood sugar level for the body to work around. Contents of this article: Using long-acting insulin Long-acting insulin cannot be delivered in pill form because it would be broken down in the stomach. Instead, it must be injected into the fatty tissue under the skin. From here, it can be gradually released into the bloodstream. Delivery methods According to the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases, there are a few ways to deliver long-acting insulin. These include: Needle and syringe: a dose of insulin is drawn from a vial into a syringe. Different types of insulin must not be mixed in the same syringe. Pen: this can be loaded with a cartridge containing a premeasured dose, or prefilled with insulin and discarded after use. Injection port: a short tube is inserted into the tissue beneath the skin. Insulin can be delivered using either a syringe or a pen. This only requires the skin to be punctured when the tube needs to be replaced. Injection sites Long-acting insulin can be injected into the abdomen, upper arms, or thighs. Abdomen injections deliver insulin into the blood most quickly. The process takes a little more time from the upper arms, and it is even slower from the thighs. It is important to stay consistent with the general injection area, but the exact injection site should be rotated frequently. Repeat injections at the same spot on the skin Continue reading >>

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

Novolog® (insulin Aspart Injection) 100 U/ml Indications And Usage

NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. NovoLog® (insulin aspart injection) 100 U/mL is an insulin analog indicated to improve glycemic control in adults and children with diabetes mellitus. NovoLog® is contraindicated during episodes of hypoglycemia and in patients hypersensitive to NovoLog® or one of its excipients. Never Share a NovoLog® FlexPen, NovoLog® FlexTouch®, PenFill® Cartridge, or PenFill® Cartridge Device Between Patients, even if the needle is changed. Patients using NovoLog® vials must never share needles or syringes with another person. Sharing poses a risk for transmission of blood-borne pathogens. Changes in insulin strength, manufacturer, type, or method of administration may affect glycemic control and predispose to hypoglycemia or hyperglycemia. These changes should be made cautiously under close medical supervision and the frequency of blood glucose monitoring should be increased. Hypoglycemia is the most common adverse effect of insulin therapy. The timing of hypoglycemia may reflect the time-action profile of the insulin formulation. Glucose monitoring is re Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Aspart?

What Is Insulin Aspart?

Itis a man made insulin that is taken subcutaneously to help reduce blood sugar levels in patients with diabetes mellitus. Diabetes is a chronic medical condition where a patient experiences high blood sugar levels as a result of the body failing to produce enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone that helps to convert glucose from the food we eat into energy. There are two forms of diabetes mellitus, type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is a condition where the pancreas produces little or no insulin as a result of beta cells being attacked by the immune system. As a result, people with type 1 diabetes require insulin injections, such as insulin aspart, so that they can survive. On the other hand, type 2 diabetes occurs when your body cells become resistant to insulin. Type 2 diabetes can be managed through regular exercise and healthy diet program in addition to oral diabetes medication such as metformin. In some cases patients with type 2 diabetes may require insulin medications, such as insulin aspart. Insulin aspart, which is marketed under the brand name Novolog , is a fast-acting insulin that can be taken together with intermediate and long-acting insulin .The medication replaces the function of the natural hormone that is produced in the pancreas, which helps transport glucose from the bloodstream to the body tissue where it is stored and used for energy. Novolog also prevents the liver from producing more glucose, which helps to reduce high blood sugar levels. Controlling blood sugar levels is important because it reduces the risk of contracting long-term health problems, such as blindness, kidney and nerve damage. It is important to note thatthis medication does not cure diabetes mellitus. Rather, it helps to control its symptoms, such as high bl Continue reading >>

Insulin: Compare Common Options For Insulin Therapy

Insulin: Compare Common Options For Insulin Therapy

Insulin therapy is a critical part of treatment for people with type 1 diabetes and also for many with type 2 diabetes. The goal of insulin therapy is to maintain blood sugar levels within your target range. Insulin is usually administered in the fat under your skin using a syringe, insulin pen or insulin pump. Which insulin regimen is best for you depends on factors such as the type of diabetes you have, how much your blood sugar fluctuates throughout the day and your lifestyle. Each insulin type is characterized by: How long it takes to begin working (onset) When it's working the hardest (peak) How long it lasts, ranging from about 3 to 26 hours Many types of insulin are available. Here's how they compare. Keep in mind that your doctor may prescribe a mixture of insulin types to use throughout the day and night. Insulin type and name Onset Peak How long it lasts Rapid-acting Insulin aspart (NovoLog) Insulin glulisine (Apidra) Insulin lispro (Humalog) 5-15 min. 45-75 min. 3-4 hours Short-acting Insulin regular (Humulin R, Novolin R) 30-45 min. 2-4 hours 6-8 hours Intermediate-acting Insulin NPH (Humulin N, Novolin N) 2 hours 4-12 hours 16-24 hours Long-acting Insulin glargine (Lantus/ Toujeo) Insulin detemir (Levemir) 2 hours No clear peak 14-24 hours In some cases, premixed insulin — a combination of specific proportions of intermediate-acting and short- or rapid-acting insulin in one bottle or insulin pen — may be an option. Continue reading >>

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

Long-acting Insulin: How It Works

When you eat, your pancreas releases a hormone called insulin. Insulin moves sugar (glucose) from your blood to your cells for energy or storage. If you take insulin, you may need some at mealtime to help lower your blood sugar after you eat. But even between meals, you need insulin in small amounts to help keep blood sugar stable. This is where long-acting insulin comes in. If you have diabetes, either your pancreas can’t produce enough (or any) insulin, or your cells can’t use it efficiently. To control your blood sugar, you need to replace or supplement the normal function of your pancreas with regular insulin injections. Insulin comes in many types. Each type differs in three ways: onset: how quickly it starts working to lower your blood sugar peak: when its effects on your blood sugar are strongest duration: how long it lowers your blood sugar According to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA), the five types of insulin are: Rapid-acting insulin: This type starts to work just 15 minutes after you take it. It peaks within 30 to 90 minutes, and its effects last for three to five hours. Short-acting insulin: This type takes about 30 to 60 minutes to become active in your bloodstream. It peaks in two to four hours, and its effects can last for five to eight hours. It is sometimes called regular-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: The intermediate type takes one to three hours to start working. It peaks in eight hours and works for 12 to 16 hours. Long-acting insulin: This type takes the longest amount of time to start working. The insulin can take up to 4 hours to get into your bloodstream. Pre-mixed: This is a combination of two different types of insulin: one that controls blood sugar at meals and another that controls blood sugar between meals. Lo Continue reading >>

What Is Regular Insulin?: Onset, Peak Time, Duration And Side Effects

What Is Regular Insulin?: Onset, Peak Time, Duration And Side Effects

What is regular insulin? Regular insulin, with alternative names soluble insulin and neutral insulin, refers to a short acting insulin which is used with exercise and diet program to manage high blood sugar in diabetic patients. However, it can be taken in combination with other long acting or intermediate insulin. This medication can be used alone or with other diabetes medication like metformin. Insulin regular is used to treat diabetes type 1 and diabetes type 2, in addition to gestational diabetes and other conditions such as diabetic ketoacidosis. Insulin regular refers to man made insulin that works the same as the insulin produced by the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that works by lowering the level of blood sugar in the body. If high blood sugar is not properly managed, it can lead to severe health conditions such as heart attack and stroke. For our bodies to properly utilize glucose found in carbohydrate rich foods, insulin is supposed to be present to facilitate the process of glucose absorption. Regular insulin works by helping glucose get into the cells so that our bodies can use to produce energy. This medication should not be used to treat type 2 diabetes in children of any age. Also, you should not use this medication if you are allergic to insulin or experience low levels of blood sugar. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar usually happens in patients that are diabetic. Symptoms of low blood sugar include: Sweating Shakiness Fatigue or weakness Impaired vision Headache Hunger Loss of consciousness Irritability Difficulty in concentration If you experience these symptoms and you think they are life threatening, you need to inform your doctor immediately. It is advisable you keep sugar sources such as fruit juice, non diet soda or hard candy in case you experi Continue reading >>

The Abcs Of Insulin

The Abcs Of Insulin

Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin is required to move sugar from the blood into the body’s cells, where it can be used for energy. For the symptoms of high blood sugar and low blood sugar, see Tables 1 and 2. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Only 5% of patients with diabetes have this form of the disease, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is much more common; the risk factors are listed in online table 3. Individuals with T2D make insulin, but their bodies don’t respond well to it, a condition known as insulin resistance. Treatment of T2D usually begins with dietary and lifestyle changes, as well as oral medications. Over time, as the pancreas struggles to make an adequate amount of insulin to overcome insulin resistance, patients may require insulin supplementation. Insulin therapy must be individualized and balanced with meal planning and exercise. When a patient begins using insulin to manage diabetes, the initial dose is just a starting point. Over time, insulin requirements are affected by factors such as weight gain or loss, changes in eating habits, and the addition of other medications. The need for insulin often increases, and the dose must be readjusted to meet the new requirements. Insulin is injected subcutaneously, meaning not very deep under the skin. Common injection sites include the stomach, buttocks, thighs, and upper arms. By rotating the site of injection, patients can avoid lipohypertrophy, a slight increase in the growth or size of fat cells under the skin. When lipohypertrophy occurs, a soft pillowy growth may form at the repeated-use injection site. Therefore, for reliable absorption rates and cosmetic Continue reading >>

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

5 Types Of Insulin And How They Work

What you need to know If you have to take insulin to treat diabetes, there’s good news: You have choices. There are five types of insulin. They vary by onset (how soon they start to work), peak (how long they take to kick into full effect) and duration (how long they stay in your body). You may have to take more than one type of insulin, and these needs may change over time (and can vary depending on your type of diabetes). Find out more about the insulin types best for you. Rapid-acting insulin What it’s called: Humalog (lispro), NovoLog (aspart), Apidra (glulisine) Rapid-acting insulin is taken just before or after meals, to control spikes in blood sugar. This type is typically used in addition to a longer-acting insulin. It often works in 15 minutes, peaks between 30 and 90 minutes, and lasts 3 to 5 hours. “You can take it a few minutes before eating or as you sit down to eat, and it starts to work very quickly,” says Manisha Chandalia, MD, director of the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch, in Galveston. Short-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin R, Novolin R Short-acting insulin covers your insulin needs during meals. It is taken about 30 minutes to an hour before a meal to help control blood sugar levels. This type of insulin takes effect in about 30 minutes to one hour, and peaks after two to four hours. Its effects tend to last about five to eight hours. “The biggest advantage of short-acting insulin is that you don't have to take it at each meal. You can take it at breakfast and supper and still have good control because it lasts a little longer,” Dr. Chandalia says. Intermediate-acting insulin What it’s called: Humulin N (NPH), Novolin N (NPH) Intermediate-acting insulin can control blood sugar levels for about Continue reading >>

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

Insulin Actions Times And Peak Times

A good way to improve your glucose levels is to track the peaks and drops in your glucose , so you can figure out why they happened and how to correct them. Once you identify glucose patterns (they ARE there!), you also want to understand when each of your insulins is active and when they typically stop lowering your glucose. This helps you adjust your doses or food intake to stop unwanted ups and downs in your readings. The table below shows the start, peak, and end times for various insulins with some explanations and typical uses for each. When Does My Insulin Peak and How Long Does It Last? designed to peak, covers meals and lowers high BGs Humalog , Novolog and Apidra insulins currently give the best coverage for meals and help keep the glucose lower afterward. Their glucose lowering activity starts to work about 20 minutes after they are taken, with a gradual rise in activity over the next 1.75 to 2.25 hours. Their activity gradually falls over the next 3 hours with about 5 to 6 hours of activity being common with these insulins.Although insulin action times are often quoted as 3-5 hours, the actual duration of insulin action is typically 5 hours or more. See our article Duration of Insulin Action for more information on this important topic. In general, "rapid" insulins are still too slow for many common meals where the glucose peaks within an hour and digestion is complete within 2-3 hours. The best kept secret on stopping post meal spiking is to eake the injection or bolus earlier before the meal and to eat slower low glycemic carbs. Regular insulin still carries its original name of "fast insulin" but its slower action often works better for people who take Symlin or for those who have gastroparesis (delayed digestion). It is also a great choice for those who Continue reading >>

Types Of Insulin

Types Of Insulin

Insulin analogs are now replacing human insulin in the US. Insulins are categorized by differences in onset, peak, duration, concentration, and route of delivery. Human Insulin and Insulin Analogs are available for insulin replacement therapy. Insulins also are classified by the timing of their action in your body – specifically, how quickly they start to act, when they have a maximal effect and how long they act.Insulin analogs have been developed because human insulins have limitations when injected under the skin. In high concentrations, such as in a vial or cartridge, human (and also animal insulin) clumps together. This clumping causes slow and unpredictable absorption from the subcutaneous tissue and a dose-dependent duration of action (i.e. the larger dose, the longer the effect or duration). In contrast, insulin analogs have a more predictable duration of action. The rapid acting insulin analogs work more quickly, and the long acting insulin analogs last longer and have a more even, “peakless” effect. Background Insulin has been available since 1925. It was initially extracted from beef and pork pancreases. In the early 1980’s, technology became available to produce human insulin synthetically. Synthetic human insulin has replaced beef and pork insulin in the US. And now, insulin analogs are replacing human insulin. Characteristics of Insulin Insulins are categorized by differences in: Onset (how quickly they act) Peak (how long it takes to achieve maximum impact) Duration (how long they last before they wear off) Concentration (Insulins sold in the U.S. have a concentration of 100 units per ml or U100. In other countries, additional concentrations are available. Note: If you purchase insulin abroad, be sure it is U100.) Route of delivery (whether they a Continue reading >>

Insulin Chart

Insulin Chart

List of insulin types available in the U.S. and how they work. By the dLife Editors Each type of insulin has its own unique behavior. One difference among types of insulin is how long they take to start working at lowering blood-glucose levels. The “insulin peak” is the point at which the dose is working at its maximum, and the “duration” is how long the blood-glucose-lowering effect of the injection will last. The following is a list of insulin types available in the United States, along with how soon they start working, their peak, and how long they last. Talk to your healthcare provider about your insulin regimen. Insulin Type Onset of Action Peak Duration of Action Lispro U-100 (Humalog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Lispro U-200 (Humalog 200) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Aspart (Novolog) Approximately 15 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Glulisine (Apidra) Approximately 20 minutes 1-2 hours 3-6 hours Regular U-100 (Novolin R, Humulin R) 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours 6-10 hours Humulin R Regular U-500 30-60 minutes 2-4 hours Up to 24 hours NPH (Novolin N, Humulin N, ReliOn) 2-4 hours 4-8 hours 10-18 hours Glargine U-100 (Lantus) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-100 (Basaglar) 1-2 hours Minimal Up to 24 hours Glargine U-300 (Toujeo) 6 hours No significant peak 24-36 hours Detemir (Levemir) 1-2 hours Minimal** Up to 24 hours** Degludec U-100 & U-200 (Tresiba) 1-4 hours No significant peak About 42 hours Afrezza < 15 minutes Approx. 50 minutes 2-3 hours *Information derived from a combination of manufacturer’s prescribing information, online professional literature sources and clinical studies. Individual response to insulin preparations may vary. **Peak and length of action may depend on size of dose and length of time since ini Continue reading >>

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