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What Are The Three Long Term Complications Of Diabetes?

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

Type 2 Diabetes Complications

With type 2 diabetes (also called type 2 diabetes mellitus), if you don’t work hard to keep your blood glucose level under control, there are short- and long-term complications to contend with. However, by watching the amount and types of food you eat (your meal plan), exercising, and taking any necessary medications, you may be able to prevent these complications. And even if you have some of the long-term, more serious complications discussed below when you’re first diagnosed, getting tight control of your blood glucose will help prevent the complications from becoming worse. (It is possible with type 2 diabetes to already have some of these complications when you’re first diagnosed. That’s because type 2 develops gradually, and you may not realize that you have high blood glucose for quite some time. Over time, high blood glucose can cause serious damage. You can learn more about that in this article on the symptoms of type 2 diabetes.) Short-term Diabetes Complications Hypoglycemia is low blood glucose (blood sugar). It is possible for your blood glucose to drop, especially if you’re taking insulin or a sulfonylurea drug (those make your body produce insulin throughout the day). With these medications, if you eat less than usual or were more active, your blood glucose may dip too much. Other possible causes of hypoglycemia include certain medications (aspirin, for example, lowers the blood glucose level if you take a dose of more than 81mg) and too much alcohol (alcohol keeps the liver from releasing glucose). Rapid heartbeat Sweating Whiteness of skin Anxiety Numbness in fingers, toes, and lips Sleepiness Confusion Headache Slurred speech Mild cases of hypoglycemia can be treated by drinking orange juice or eating a glucose tablet—those will quickly rai Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications In Diabetes

Long-term Complications In Diabetes

When a person doesn't manage diabetes well, it can cause blood vessel and nerve damage. This damage happens over time, usually within 5 to 10 years, leading to long-term complications. The rate at which this damage happens is directly related to blood sugar and blood pressure levels. When blood sugar levels are higher than 140 and blood pressure levels are higher than 129/79 over several years, damage is greater and happens sooner. That's why it's so important to keep blood sugar and blood pressure levels as well controlled as possible. A person with diabetes is more likely than someone without diabetes to have: A heart attack or stroke. Vision changes, even blindness. Kidney disease. Nerve damage in the feet. Nerve damage to internal organs, including stomach, intestines, bladder, and genitals (causing sexual problems). Frequent infections and wounds that won't heal. All of these are serious problems. The chance that a person will have any of them is higher if blood sugar and blood pressure levels are uncontrolled for a long period of time. How Damage Happens Arteries are blood vessels that carry oxygen and nutrients to all parts of the body, including the heart, liver, skin, brain, muscles, and all the nerves. When blood vessels are damaged, it causes changes to these parts of the body. Having diabetes increases a person's chance of having long-term complications caused by blood vessel damage. A person with diabetes who also smokes, eats food that's high in fat, and doesn't get much exercise has an even higher chance of damaging arteries and blood vessels. The damage to blood vessels and nerves can happen in small blood vessels of the eyes, kidneys, and other organs; large blood vessels leading to the heart and brain; and nerves in the legs and feet as well as those i Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Search the A-Z of complications: Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to a number of short and long-term health complications, including hypoglycemia, heart disease, nerve damage and amputation, and vision problems. The majority of these diabetes-related conditions occur as a result of uncontrolled blood glucose levels, particularly elevated blood sugar over a prolonged period of time. It is essential that diabetics are aware of the complications that can occur as a result of diabetes to ensure that the first symptoms of any possible illness are spotted before they develop. In this section, you'll find information on all of the diseases, illnesses and disorders that are linked to diabetes, including the different causes, symptoms and treatments for each condition. How common are complications of diabetes? It is common for most people with diabetes to begin to develop complications after having diabetes for a number of years. With good diabetes control and living a healthy, active lifestyle, it is possible for people to go a number of decades complication free. However, if you have had less well controlled diabetes, have led a less healthy lifestyle, or had undiagnosed diabetes for a number of years, the complications of diabetes are more likely to develop earlier. Why do complications occur? Scientists still do not fully understand how complications develop. What is known, however, is that high blood glucose levels cause damage to the blood vessels and nerves which supply our organs and therefore result in impaired functioning of any affected organs. How do I prevent complications? The risk of developing complications can be reduced by following a number of healthy lifestyle steps: Reducing your HbA1c Large scale research studies have shown that the chances of developing the Continue reading >>

The Danger Of Long-term Diabetes Complications

The Danger Of Long-term Diabetes Complications

Living with diabetes brings many daily challenges and frustrations. You have to watch your blood glucose levels, pay close attention to what and when you eat, and take medications, including insulin. Added to that burden is the realization that if you dont, your health could be seriously compromised in years to come. Poorly controlled diabetes can lead over time to a number of complications. Some like heart disease , stroke and kidney disease can be life-threatening. The biggest one is cardiovascular disease, said Arch Mainous III , a diabetes researcher and chair of the department of health services research, management and policyat the University of Floridas College of Public Health and Health Professions. Unfortunately, some damage may even occur before an individual is diagnosed with diabetes. Heart disease is the No. 1 killer of people with diabetes; those with diabetes are up to four times more likely to develop cardiovascular disease. The problem is diabetes takes a long time to develop, and by the time somebody becomes symptomatic, theyre kind of down the road on some of these target complications, Mainous said. Because diabetes may hide in the body for years, millions at risk for the disease are not aware of it, Mainous said. In fact, a huge proportion of the American population 39 percent, or 86 million adults have prediabetes. And about 90 percent of those cases are undiagnosed, Mainous said. So theres a whole lot more people at risk for developing diabetes, [but] if you identify these people, you can keep them from progressing to diabetes. You can even reverse them back to a normal blood glucose level, he said. Complications of diabetes include these, according to the Mayo Clinic and the Cleveland Clinic: Heart disease and stroke. Heart disease is the No. 1 Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

en espaolComplicaciones a largo plazo de la diabetes Many of the complications of diabetes don't show up until after many years even decades of having the disease. They usually develop silently and gradually over time, so even if people with diabetes aren't having any signs of complications, they may still eventually develop them. Talking or thinking about long-term complications can be scary. And it can be hard for anyone to make changes in how they live today to decrease the risk of health problems that may not show up for decades. But it's important to start now. Managing your diabetes by eating right, getting regular exercise, and taking your medicine as directed by your diabetes health care team is the best way to reduce the risk of developing complications. You may have wondered why doctors talk so much about keeping blood sugar levels in a healthy range. Here's why: Long-term diabetes problems or complications are often linked to higher blood sugar levels over a long period of time. These complications can affect several different parts of the body. But blood sugar control isn't the only thing that determines a person's risk for diabetes complications. Other factors, like genes, can also play a role. Parts of the body that can be most affected by diabetes complications are the: People with diabetes have a greater risk of developing eye problems, including: Cataracts: A cataract is a thickening and clouding of the lens of the eye. The lens is the part of the eye that helps you focus on what you see. Cataracts can make a person's vision blurry or make it hard to see at night. Doctors think that people with diabetes are more likely to develop cataracts if they have high blood sugar levels over a long period of time. If cataracts get in the way of seeing properly, a Continue reading >>

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Hyperglycemia In Diabetes

Print Overview High blood sugar (hyperglycemia) affects people who have diabetes. Several factors can contribute to hyperglycemia in people with diabetes, including food and physical activity choices, illness, nondiabetes medications, or skipping or not taking enough glucose-lowering medication. It's important to treat hyperglycemia, because if left untreated, hyperglycemia can become severe and lead to serious complications requiring emergency care, such as a diabetic coma. In the long term, persistent hyperglycemia, even if not severe, can lead to complications affecting your eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. Symptoms Hyperglycemia doesn't cause symptoms until glucose values are significantly elevated — above 200 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL), or 11 millimoles per liter (mmol/L). Symptoms of hyperglycemia develop slowly over several days or weeks. The longer blood sugar levels stay high, the more serious the symptoms become. However, some people who've had type 2 diabetes for a long time may not show any symptoms despite elevated blood sugars. Early signs and symptoms Recognizing early symptoms of hyperglycemia can help you treat the condition promptly. Watch for: Frequent urination Increased thirst Blurred vision Fatigue Headache Later signs and symptoms If hyperglycemia goes untreated, it can cause toxic acids (ketones) to build up in your blood and urine (ketoacidosis). Signs and symptoms include: Fruity-smelling breath Nausea and vomiting Shortness of breath Dry mouth Weakness Confusion Coma Abdominal pain When to see a doctor Call 911 or emergency medical assistance if: You're sick and can't keep any food or fluids down, and Your blood glucose levels are persistently above 240 mg/dL (13 mmol/L) and you have ketones in your urine Make an appointment with your Continue reading >>

Diabetes Complications

Diabetes Complications

Complications caused by diabetes People with diabetes must routinely monitor and regulate their blood sugar. No matter how careful you may be, there’s still a possibility that a problem might arise. There are two types of complications you may experience: acute and chronic. Acute complications require emergency care. Examples include hypoglycemia and ketoacidosis. If left untreated, these conditions can cause: seizures loss of consciousness death Chronic complications occur when diabetes isn’t managed properly. Diabetes causes high blood sugar levels. If not controlled well over time, high blood sugar levels can damage various organs, including the: eyes kidneys heart skin Unmanaged diabetes can also cause nerve damage. People with diabetes can experience sudden drops in their blood sugar. Skipping a meal or taking too much insulin or other medications that increase insulin levels in the body are common causes. People who are on other diabetes medications that do not increase insulin levels are not at risk for hypoglycemia. Symptoms can include: blurry vision rapid heartbeat headache shaking dizziness If your blood sugar gets too low, you can experience fainting, seizures, or coma. This is a complication of diabetes that occurs when your body cannot use sugar, or glucose, as a fuel source because your body has no insulin or not enough insulin. If your cells are starved for energy, your body begins to break down fat. Potentially toxic acids called ketone bodies, which are byproducts of fat breakdown, build up in the body. This can lead to: dehydration abdominal pain breathing problems Diabetes can damage blood vessels in the eyes and cause various problems. Possible eye conditions may include: Cataracts Cataracts are two to five times more likely to develop in people Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Complications

Diabetes: Complications

People with diabetes are at risk for long-term problems affecting the eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, feet, and nerves. The best way to prevent or delay these problems is to control your blood sugar and take good care of yourself. Eyes It is recommended that people with diabetes see an eye doctor every year for a dilated eye exam. Eye problems that can occur with diabetes include: Cataracts: a clouding of the lens of the eyes. Glaucoma: increased pressure in the eye. Retinopathy: eye changes with the retina in the back of the eye. Symptoms of eye problems include Blurred vision. Spots or lines in your vision. Watery eyes. Eye discomfort. Loss of vision. If you have any changes in your vision, call your healthcare provider. Have your urine checked for protein at least once a year. Protein in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. High blood pressure might also lead to kidney disease. Your blood pressure should be checked when you see your healthcare provider. Symptoms of a kidney problem include: Swelling of the hands, feet, and face. Weight gain from edema. Itching and/or drowsiness. (This can occur with end stage kidney disease.) Prompt treatment may slow the changes with kidney disease. All people with diabetes have an increased chance for heart disease and strokes. Heart disease is the major cause of death in people with diabetes. It is important to control other risks such as high blood pressure and high fats (cholesterol), as well as blood sugar. Symptoms of a heart attack include: Feeling faint. Feeling dizzy. Sweating. Chest pain or pressure. Pain in the shoulders, jaw, and left arm. Warning signs of a stroke include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, usually on one side of the body. Sudden nausea. Vomiting. Difficulty speaking or understanding w Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Long Term Problems

Diabetes: Long Term Problems

Complications Diabetes can cause other health problems. Sometimes these problems are referred to as complications (COM-pli-KAY-shuns). Long-term problems may develop when you have diabetes for a long time, especially when diabetes is not in good control. You can reduce your chances of developing long term problems when you keep your blood glucose, blood pressure and cholesterol levels in a good range. In case of emergency, you should always wear a form of medical identification (ID). Examples are ID bracelets and necklaces. To reduce your risk of getting other health problems from diabetes, you need good control of your blood glucose (sugar). Good control means keeping blood glucose at certain levels. To learn more about good control and healthy blood glucose numbers, see the UPMC patient education sheet Diabetes: Your Management Plan. This patient education sheet tells you about long-term problems, what to do for them, and how to prevent them. High blood glucose over a long time can lead to: Kidney damage Eye damage Nerve damage Hardening of the arteries Kidney Problems The name for kidney damage is nephropathy (nef-RAW-pith-ee). High blood glucose can damage the blood vessels in the kidneys. The damaged blood vessels cannot filter all the waste products from your blood. So some waste remains in your blood. And protein that should stay in your body leaks into the urine and leaves your body. If kidney damage continues, in time your kidneys will fail to work at all. If this happens, you will need to have dialysis (dye-AL-ih-sis). Dialysis is a process that removes the waste products from your blood. Some people may need to have a kidney transplant. Good control of blood glucose helps reduce your chance of getting kidney disease. To see if you have early kidney disease, y Continue reading >>

The Major Long-term Complications Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

The Major Long-term Complications Of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus

The Major Long-Term Complications of Uncontrolled Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes mellitus (sometimes called sugar diabetes) is a medical condition that occurs when the body cannot use glucose (a type of sugar) appropriately. Glucose is the main source of energy for the bodys cells. The levels of glucose in the blood are controlled by a hormone called insulin, which is made by an organ called the pancreas. Insulin is secreted in the blood and acts as a vehicle to allow for glucose to enter from the blood stream into the cells.The latter in turn, convert glucose into energy to complete their essential functions. Statistics indicate that some 25.8 million children and adults in the United Statescomprising about 8.3% of the U.S. population have been diagnosed with Diabetes. Diabetes occurs either when the pancreas does not make enough insulin (Type I Diabetes) or, when the body cant respond normally to the insulin that is available (Type II Diabetes). This causes glucose levels in the blood to rise, leading to symptoms such as increased urination, extreme thirst, persistent sensation of hunger and unexplained weight loss. All forms of diabetes increase the risk of long-term health complications as the unutilized glucose molecules circulate in the blood stream and eventually start to interfere with the normal physiology and function of different tissues. The major long-term complications of Diabetes are by and large related to damage caused in the circulatory system. In fact, Diabetes irreversibly damages the large blood vessels, doubling the risk of cardiovascular disease in the form of ischemic heart disease (angina and myocardial infarctions), cerebrovascular disease (stroke and transient ischemic attacks) and peripheral vascular disease (atherosclerosis of the blood vessels Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

Long-term Complications Of Diabetes

It is important to keep your blood sugar, blood pressure, and cholesterol in a healthy range. You should learn these basic steps for managing diabetes and staying as healthy as possible. Steps may include: A healthy diet Exercise Medicines You may need to check your blood sugar daily or more often. Your health care provider will also help you by ordering blood tests and other tests. All these may help you keep complications of diabetes away. You will need to check your blood sugar level at home. You will use a special device called a glucose meter to test your blood sugar. Your provider will let you know if you need to check it every day and how many times each day. Your provider will also tell you what blood sugar numbers you are trying to achieve. This is called managing your blood sugar. These goals will be set for different times during the day. To prevent heart disease and stroke, you may be asked to take medicine and change your diet and activity: Your provider may ask you to take a medicine called an ACE inhibitor or a different medicine called an ARB, for high blood pressure or kidney problems. Your provider may ask you to take a medicine called a statin to keep your cholesterol down. Your provider may ask you to take aspirin to prevent heart attacks. Ask your provider if aspirin is right for you. Regular exercise is good for people with diabetes. Talk to your provider first about what exercises are best for you and how much exercise you should do every day. DO NOT smoke. Smoking makes diabetes complications worse. If you do smoke, work with your provider to find a way to quit. To keep your feet healthy, you should: Get a foot exam by your provider at least every 6 to 12 months and learn whether you have nerve damage. Make sure you are wearing the right kinds of Continue reading >>

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

Diabetes - Long-term Effects

On this page: Diabetes is a condition in which there is too much glucose (a type of sugar) in the blood. Over time, high blood glucose levels can damage the body's organs. Possible complications include damage to large (macrovascular) and small (microvascular) blood vessels, which can lead to heart attack, stroke, and problems with the kidneys, eyes, gums, feet and nerves. Reducing risk of diabetes complications The good news is that the risk of most diabetes-related complications can be reduced by keeping blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels within recommended range. Also, being a healthy weight, eating healthily, reducing alcohol intake, and not smoking will help reduce your risk. Regular check-ups and screening are important to pick up any problems early Diabetes and healthy eating If you have diabetes it’s important to include a wide variety of nutritious and healthy foods in your diet, and to avoid snacking on sugary foods. Eating healthy foods can help control your blood glucose and cholesterol levels, and your blood pressure. Enjoy a variety of foods from each food group – be sure to include foods high in fibre and low in fat, and reduce your salt intake. It’s helpful to consult with a dietitian to review your current eating plan and provide a guide about food choices and food quantities. Alcohol intake and diabetes Limit alcohol intake. If you drink alcohol, have no more than two standard drinks per day. If you are pregnant or considering pregnancy or are breastfeeding, then zero alcohol intake is recommended. Diabetes and healthy weight If you are overweight, even losing a small amount of weight, especially round the abdomen, helps lower your blood pressure, blood glucose and cholesterol levels. It can be daunting trying to lose weight, so Continue reading >>

Long Term Complications Of Diabetes

Long Term Complications Of Diabetes

The long term complications of diabetes are health conditions caused by gradual damage to blood vessels feeding one or more organs in the body. There are many different complications that can occur and it is common for people to develop more than one diabetic complication, particularly if they had diabetes for a long time or have not kept their condition controlled well enough. Long term complications develop ifblood glucose levels are too highfor extended periods of time. The higher sugar levels are and the longer they remain high can each increase the likelihood of diabetic complications. People with type 2 diabetesshould note that blood glucose levels may have been running higher than normal for a number of months or years before they were diagnosed ,which is a major reason for why early diagnosis of diabetes is important. The treatment for different conditions varies. However a number of basic but important treatment measures are common to the complications listed. These treatment measures include: Neuropathy is the name for nerve damage. Nerves can become damaged anywhere in the body, with the nerves in extremities such as the feet and hands being the most common. If neuropathy develops, nerves that feed the muscles and internal organs can also become damaged. Neuropathy is commonly the first complication that people with diabetes notice symptoms of and, in people with type 2 diabetes , may sometimes be recognised before diabetes is diagnosed. If neuropathy causes excessive or regular pain, specific painkillers that are able to reduce nerve pain may be prescribed. Retinopathy is damage that occurs to the retina, the layer of cells at the back of the eye that receives light and converts it into electrical signals, allowing us to see. Retinopathy occurs if blood ves Continue reading >>

What Are The Complications Of Diabetes?

What Are The Complications Of Diabetes?

This section is meant to familiarize you with some of the most common diabetes-related complications and other problems. Keeping blood glucose levels as near normal as possible, along with getting regular check-ups and blood tests may help delay or prevent complications of diabetes. Eye disease* Many people with diabetes develop some form of eye disease (retinopathy), caused by damage to the network of blood vessels that supply the retina. This can damage vision or cause blindness. Retinopathy can be quite advanced before it affects vision, so it is important that people with diabetes have regular eye screenings. If caught early, treatment can prevent blindness. Oral health* There is an increased risk of inflammation of the tissue surrounding the teeth (periodontitis) in people with poor glucose control. Periodontitis is a major cause of tooth loss and is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. Management of periodontitis is very important in people with diabetes because good oral hygiene can prevent tooth loss and improve glucose control. Cardiovascular disease* Cardiovascular disease is the most common cause of death and disability among people with diabetes. The types that accompany diabetes include: angina (chest pain or discomfort); myocardial infarction (heart attack); stroke; peripheral artery disease (reduced blood flow to limbs); and congestive heart failure (heart weakness that leads to a build-up of fluid in the lungs and surrounding body tissues). High blood pressure, high cholesterol, and high blood glucose (all common in diabetes) are some of the factors that increase the risk of cardiovascular disease. Kidney disease* Kidney disease (nephropathy) is more common in people with diabetes. Diabetes is one of the leading causes of chronic Continue reading >>

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