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What Are The Symptoms Of Insulin Shock?

Shock Therapy

Shock Therapy

Shock therapy, also called Electroshock Therapy, Electroconvulsive Therapy, or Ect, method of treating certain psychiatric disorders through the use of drugs or electric current to induce shock; the therapy derived from the notion (later disproved) that epileptic convulsions and schizophrenic symptoms never occurred together. In 1933 the psychiatrist Manfred Sakel of Vienna presented the first report of his work with insulin shock. Until the discovery of the tranquilizing drugs, variations of insulin-shock therapy (also called insulin-coma therapy) were commonly used in the treatment of schizophrenia and other psychotic conditions. With insulin-shock treatment, the patient is given increasingly large doses of insulin, which reduce the sugar content of the blood and bring on a state of coma. Usually the comatose condition is allowed to persist for about an hour, at which time it is terminated by administering warm salt solution via stomach tube or by intravenous injection of glucose. Insulin shock had its greatest effectiveness with schizophrenic patients whose illness had lasted less than two years (the rate of spontaneous recovery from schizophrenia also is highest in the first two years of the illness). Insulin-shock therapy also had more value in the treatment of paranoid and catatonic schizophrenia than in the hebephrenic types. Electroconvulsive, or electroshock, therapy, introduced in Rome in 1938 by U. Cerletti and L. Bini, has been widely used in treating disturbances in which severe depression is the predominant symptom. It has been particularly recommended for manic-depressive psychoses and other types of depression. The technique is essentially that of passing alternating current through the head between two electrodes placed over the temples. The passage of Continue reading >>

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock In The First Trimester Of Pregnancy With Diabetes

Protecting Yourself Against Insulin Shock In The First Trimester Of Pregnancy With Diabetes

A couple of factors lead to increased risk of insulin shock comas during the first trimester. For many, insulin sensitivity increases and the pancreas isn’t yet producing the hormones associated with insulin resistance. In addition, many type 1s will be taken off of their current basal insulin if it is not yet approved for use during pregnancy. Before pregnancy, my A1C was 6.5% using Levemir as basal insulin and Apidra as bolus insulin. I maintained very stable glucose readings using this combination and was rarely out of range. However, when I met with my endocrinologist during the first five weeks of pregnancy, he informed me that Levemir wouldn’t be approved for pregnancy until possibly 2012, if ever. He added that Lantus wasn’t clinically approved for use in pregnancy because it sometimes affected fetal growth hormones. We discussed at length my decision to switch back to NPH. I had left NPH behind in 2003 because its peaks and valleys were too extreme for me, and I often found myself out of range. Even with my background knowledge and history with NPH, however, I found myself in eight insulin shock comas during the first trimester. Many times it was due to the sudden peaks NPH created in me. My peak on NPH came between four to six hours after injection. This two-hour span was difficult for me to grasp because every day it peaked at different times. Because of the pregnancy hormones and tight control, I was also battling hypoglycemic unawareness. I could no longer detect the early symptoms of low glucose and was unaware that I was going into shock. To safeguard myself against insulin shocks, I took some steps: 1. I informed my husband about the symptoms in great detail. One symptom of mine was cold, clammy hands and cold sweat. Another was time urgency. I woul Continue reading >>

Hypoglycemia And

Hypoglycemia And "insulin Shock"

Significantly, the most common problem diabetics experience today is not "high blood sugar" but "low blood sugar!" Diabetes medications are powerful but imprecise, and today's blood glucose testing cannot always guarantee you'll stay out of "too low." The Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, completed in 1993, proved that the major diabetes complications: retinopathy, nephropathy, neuropathy, and diabetic heart disease, all follow elevated blood glucose. Diabetics who keep their numbers down cut the risk of complications. But in the rush to cut blood glucose, and keep it down, sometimes we fall too far. Why is immaterial: missed meals, improper medication dosage, departure from scheduling, abnormal exercise, consumption of alcohol, stress, or even "no reason in particular." Sometimes the numbers just drop too far. What happens next? A person going into a "low" can appear to be drunk. They can sweat, talk confused, become disoriented, stumble, lose their bearings, become aggressive, even "feisty," sometimes obscene, or pass out... But they're NOT drunk— and it is no fun they're having. The brain isn't getting the nourishment it needs, and the person can't function. Depending on severity, and depending on the individual, the person can be light-headed, unconscious, comatose... or dead. A hypoglycemic event is an emergency, and intervention is necessary. When You're Low: You have two lines of defense. One is your schedule. Know what your body needs, and keep to it! Take your medications on time, eat the right amount on time, and get the appropriate exercise—on time. The second line is your blood glucose monitor. The more you test, the better idea you have about where your sugars are. If your numbers are dropping dangerously, your monitor will reveal it. This means Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar/insulin Shock)

Type 2 Diabetes And Hypoglycemia (low Blood Sugar/insulin Shock)

People with type 2 diabetes are especially at risk for hypoglycemia, which is also called low blood sugar or insulin shock. Hypoglycemia develops if blood glucose levels fall below normal. This may be caused by insufficient intake of food, too much exercise or excessive alcohol intake. One of the most common causes of hypoglycemia is injecting too much insulin. People with diabetes who inject insulin are at high risk of developing hypoglycemia. But anyone with diabetes using hypoglycemic (blood sugar lowering) medications needs to watch for signs of hypoglycemia. Usually the condition is manageable, though occasionally it can be severe or even life-threatening, particularly if the victim fails to recognize the symptoms. Managing diabetes as effectively as possible to increase insulin sensitivity can greatly reduce the risk of hypoglycemia. It is also essential to manage exercise and food intake responsibly, as directed by your doctor. Mild hypoglycemia is common among people with type 2 diabetes. Severe episodes are rare, even among those who are taking insulin. However, everyone who is controlling glucose levels should be aware of warning symptoms. Persons with diabetes at highest risk for severe hypoglycemia are those who have a previous history of the disorder or those who develop "hypoglycemia unawareness." (1) This latter condition occurs when people become insensitive to hypoglycemic symptoms. In such cases, hypoglycemia appears without warning, and can escalate to a severe level. Even a single recent episode of hypoglycemia may make it more difficult to detect the next episode. But with vigilant monitoring and by rigorously avoiding low blood glucose levels, people with diabetes can often regain the ability to sense the symptoms. It is important to note that even Continue reading >>

Medical Emergencies: Diagnosing And Treating Insulin Shock And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Medical Emergencies: Diagnosing And Treating Insulin Shock And Diabetic Ketoacidosis

Excerpt from A Comprehensive Guide to Wilderness & Travel Medicine, 3rd Edition, by Dr. Eric A. Weiss. If a person who has diabetes becomes confused, weak, or unconscious for no apparent reason, he may be suffering from insulin shock (low blood sugar) or diabetic ketoacidosis (high blood sugar). INSULIN SHOCK (LOW BLOOD SUGAR) If a person with diabetes takes too much insulin or fails to eat enough food to match his insulin level or his level of exercise, a rapid drop in blood sugar can occur. Symptoms may come on very rapidly and include an altered level of consciousness, ranging from slurred speech, bizarre behaviour, and loss of coordination, to seizures and unconsciousness. Treatment If still conscious, the victim should be given something containing sugar to drink or eat as rapidly as possible. This can be fruit juice, candy, or a non-diet soft drink. If the victim is unconscious, place sugar granules, cake icing, or Glutose® paste from your first aid kit under his tongue, where it will be rapidly absorbed. DIABETIC KETOACIDOSIS (HIGH BLOOD SUGAR) Diabetic ketoacidosis (formerly called diabetic coma) comes on gradually and is the result of insufficient insulin. This eventually leads to a very high sugar level in the victim’s blood. Early symptoms include frequent urination and thirst. Later, the victim will become dehydrated, confused, or comatose, and will develop nausea, vomiting, abdominal pain, and a rapid breathing rate with a fruity odor to his breath. Treatment The victim needs immediate evacuation to a medical facility. If vomiting is not present and the victim is awake and alert, have him drink small, frequent sips of water. If you are unsure whether the victim is suffering from insulin shock (low blood sugar) or ketoacidosis (high blood sugar), it is al Continue reading >>

Pet Health:

Pet Health:

Also see Hypoglycemia Quick Reference! by Melissa: PRINT THIS OUT Medical Data: Hypoglycemic Episodes Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a dangerous effect of overdosing insulin. Too much insulin triggers the body to continue processing glucose, ultimately sending blood glucose (BG) levels dangerously low. Also known as insulin shock, hypoglycemia can be a life-threatening and possibly fatal condition. First aid at home can be life saving. Home testing the BG levels in your cat is highly recommended because of the increased certainty that comes with knowing a precise BG level, though many others find it unnecessary in a regulated cat. While home testing was once a topic of much contention, veterinary research supports home testing and knowledgable vets recommend it. These guidelines are not intended to replace the advice given by your veterinarian. It is very important that you discuss any and all treatment options with your cat’s physician BEFORE an event has occurred. Symptoms of hypoglycemia: [in order of ascending severity] abnormal hunger / complete disinterest in food restlessness weakness, lethargy head tilting shivering staggering, uncoordinated movements problems with eyesight disorientation (yowling, walking in circles, hiding, etc.) convulsions or seizures coma This list is by no means exhaustive; cats have also been known to be very sleepy, drool, vomit, or have glassy eyes. Be aware of behavior from your cat that is uncommon, but don't fret every time your pet gives you a single funny look. Treating hypoglycemia: During a hypoglycemic attack you must stay calm. You must work quickly, but carefully. Your goal is to bring the blood glucose back up to a safe level, continue to observe your pet, and contact the vet. Immediate oral application of a glucose s Continue reading >>

First Aid For Insulin Shock

First Aid For Insulin Shock

The topic First Aid for Insulin Shock you are seeking is a synonym, or alternative name, or is closely related to the topic First Aid for Shock due to Increased Insulin Effect. Please find relevant information on First Aid for Insulin Shock regarding cause, signs & symptoms, administration of first aid treatment, prognosis, preventive measures, and additional resources HERE. Quick Summary: Shock due to Increased Insulin Effect, or Insulin Shock, is a condition in which there is a surge in insulin levels, which leads to dangerously low blood sugar levels The condition is often caused when a meal is skipped by a diabetic, who is on insulin Note: Seek medical help, as appropriate In case of severe and/or life-threatening symptoms, call 911 (or your local emergency number) for immediate assistance Confirm that the airways are protected; also, ensure breathing and the presence of pulse (as applicable) What are some Useful Resources for Additional Information on Insulin Shock? American Diabetes Association 1701 North Beauregard St. Alexandria, VA 22311 Phone: (800) 342-2383 Email: [email protected] Website: References and Information Sources used for Insulin Shock: (accessed on 10/03/2017) (accessed on 10/03/2017) (accessed on 10/03/2017) (accessed on 10/03/2017) Helpful Peer-Reviewed Medical Articles for Insulin Shock: Holger, J. S., Stellpflug, S. J., Cole, J. B., Harris, C. R., & Engebretsen, K. M. (2011). High-dose insulin: a consecutive case series in toxin-induced cardiogenic shock. Clinical toxicology, 49(7), 653-658. Urban, M. J., Dobrowsky, R. T., & Blagg, B. S. (2012). Heat shock response and insulin-associated neurodegeneration. Trends in pharmacological sciences, 33(3), 129-137. Chen, X. L., Xia, Z. F., & Wei, H. F. (2011). Escharectomy and allografting during s Continue reading >>

What`s The Difference Between Diabetic And Insulin Comas?

What`s The Difference Between Diabetic And Insulin Comas?

Dear Dr. Johnson: What is the difference between a diabetic coma and an insulin coma? A diabetic coma is the result of hyperglycemia--too much blood sugar --and typically develops slowly over a matter of hours or days as blood sugar and other unwanted blood products build up in the body. Diabetic coma is treated with insulin administered intravenously. This lowers the blood sugar level. Insulin shock is caused by too much insulin, a state that leads to hypoglycemia--too little blood sugar. This condition can come on very rapidly in a person taking insulin for diabetes; therefore, diabetics are instructed to recognize hypoglycemia`s early warning symptoms (mental changes, sweating, etc.) and then to take action to raise their blood sugar levels. When a person with diabetes is found in an unconscious state, it is often difficult to know whether it is the result of a blood sugar level that is too high or too low. Therefore, the usual course of action is to raise the blood sugar level until testing confirms the nature of the problem. There will be little danger in giving added blood sugar to an individual with an already high level, and it might be lifesaving if the problem is low blood sugar. Dear Dr. Johnson: What is your opinion on the current debate on whether restaurants and fast-food joints should list the ingredients of the foods they prepare? I personally favor a simple form of ingredient listing that would give the percentages of fat, carbohydrates and protein as well as the calorie and salt content of foods. I don`t think all ingredients have to be listed, though I do believe the information should be made available if someone requests it. I think we all would be well served by having the major items of nutritional interest for public view. Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Diabetic Shock And Insulin Reactions

Severe hypoglycemia, or diabetic shock, is a serious health risk for anyone with diabetes. Also called insulin reaction, as a consequence of too much insulin, it can occur anytime there is an imbalance between the insulin in your system, the amount of food you eat, or your level of physical activity. It can even happen while you are doing all you think you can do to manage your diabetes. The symptoms of diabetic shock may seem mild at first. But they should not be ignored. If it isn't treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that causes you to faint, requiring immediate medical attention. Diabetic shock can also lead to a coma and death. It's important that not only you, but your family and others around you, learn to recognize the signs of hypoglycemia and know what to do about them. It could save your life. Hypoglycemia is a low level of blood sugar. The cells in your body use sugar from carbohydrates for energy. Insulin, which normally is made in the pancreas, is necessary for sugar to enter the cells. It helps keep the levels of sugar in the blood from getting too high. It's important to maintain the proper level of sugar in your blood. Levels that are too high can cause severe dehydration, which can be life threatening. Over time, excess sugar in the body does serious damage to organs such as your heart, eyes, and nervous system. Ordinarily, the production of insulin is regulated inside your body so that you naturally have the amount of insulin you need to help control the level of sugar. But if your body doesn't make its own insulin or if it can't effectively use the insulin it does produce, you need to inject insulin as a medicine or take another medication that will increase the amount of insulin your body does make. So if you need to me Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock

Insulin Shock

Insulin is used to control the body’s glucose levels. The term “Insulin shock” or “hypoglycemia” comes from an overreaction to, or a lowering, of the body’s glucose. The symptoms of diabetic hypoglycemia can be classified into three categories, the early or mild symptoms, moderate symptoms, and severe symptoms. An insulin-induced glucose shortage affects the brain’s ability to carry out its various functions, with consequential reactions. The symptoms of diabetes considered to be early warning signs of “insulin shock” can be: Excessive sweating Shakiness Dizziness Hunger Irritability or moodiness Anxiety or nervousness Rapid heartbeat The moderate symptoms of this condition can include the above as well as: Increased tiredness or weakness Headaches Confusion Poor coordination When the level of blood sugar drops to a significantly low level, further severe symptoms can be: Blurred vision Slurred speech Drowsiness Clumsiness or jerky movements Convulsions or seizures If not treated on time, insulin shock may eventually result in loss of consciousness, diabetic coma, and even death. Sometimes diabetic hypoglycemia can occur during the night, while sleeping. This can present the following symptoms: Damp clothes and bedsheets due to excessive sweating Nightmares Confusion Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock

Insulin Shock

shock [shok] 1. a sudden disturbance of mental equilibrium. 2. a condition of acute peripheral circulatory failure due to derangement of circulatory control or loss of circulating fluid. It is marked by hypotension and coldness of the skin, and often by tachycardia and anxiety. Untreated shock can be fatal. Called also circulatory collapse. Mechanisms of Circulatory Shock. The essentials of shock are easier to understand if the circulatory system is thought of as a four-part mechanical device made up of a pump (the heart), a complex system of flexible tubes (the blood vessels), a circulating fluid (the blood), and a fine regulating system or “computer” (the nervous system) designed to control fluid flow and pressure. The diameter of the blood vessels is controlled by impulses from the nervous system which cause the muscular walls to contract. The nervous system also affects the rapidity and strength of the heartbeat, and thereby the blood pressure as well. Shock, which is associated with a dangerously low blood pressure, can be produced by factors that attack the strength of the heart as a pump, decrease the volume of the blood in the system, or permit the blood vessels to increase in diameter. Types of Circulatory Shock. There are five main types: Hypovolemic (low-volume) shock occurs whenever there is insufficient blood to fill the circulatory system. Neurogenic shock is due to disorders of the nervous system. Anaphylactic (allergic) shock and septic shock are both due to reactions that impair the muscular functioning of the blood vessels. And cardiogenic shock is caused by impaired function of the heart. Hypovolemic (Low-Volume) Shock. This is a common type that happens when blood or plasma is lost in such quantities that the remaining blood cannot fill the circu Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Shock?

What Is Insulin Shock?

When too much insulin is in the blood it can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood sugar). This can happen from not eating enough food, exercising more than usual and drinking alcohol without eating. Drinking orange juice or having a few quick-acting carbohydrate tablets will help your symptoms. The symptoms of insulin shock should never be ignored. Dizziness Shaking Sweating Irritability Quick heart rate Headache Confusion Fainting Poor coordination Click here to learn more about how to prevent and treat insulin shock. Continue reading >>

What To Do If Someone Goes Into Diabetic Shock?

What To Do If Someone Goes Into Diabetic Shock?

There are various complications that can be associated with diabetes. There are situations and causes that could possibly bring your blood glucose levels to dangerously low levels. Such a situation where the blood glucose level falls below a particular level is known as hypoglycemia or a diabetic shock. It is important that not only a diabetes patient but all the near and dear ones of the patient be aware of this life-threatening condition and the ways of handling the same. So, let us understand from this article what should a person do if he or she or anyone around is going into a diabetic shock. What is a Diabetic Shock? In order to understand how to deal with a situation where a diabetes patient has suffered from a diabetes shock, we first need to understand the very meaning of diabetic shock. Diabetes shock is also known as severe hypoglycemia or insulin shock. It is a situation where the sugar or glucose levels of a patient drops below 70 mg/dl. The main situation which leads to the occurrence of a diabetic shock is an imbalance between the amount of the hormone insulin in our system, the total quantity of food eaten, and the level of physical activity. The main causes of a diabetic shock include the following: You suddenly become more physically active than before You suddenly change the total amount as well as the frequency with which you eat food When you skip a meal You are an alcoholic and keep drinking without eating food When you are not taking your insulin at the prescribed time as suggested by the experts Having too low of blood glucose in the body is an extremely dangerous situation and you should not only be aware of how to deal with it but there are certain warning signs which tend to send you the signal that the person needs medical help. This ensures Continue reading >>

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

Diabetic Shock: Everything You Need To Know

What Is It? If you are diabetic, you should know that Diabetic Shock or Extreme Hypoglycemia is a serious health risk. It is medical emergency wherein sugar levels fall below 70 mg/dl. Diabetic shock symptoms come from the body’s reaction to too much insulin or too little sugar. So, it’s crucial for every diabetic to know why it happens, what to expect and how to treat it. Why Does Diabetic Shock Happen? Insulin helps sugar enter the cells. Diabetic shock or Insulin Reaction is the result of having too much insulin or too little sugar in the body, at any point of time. The condition could happen due to: Excess medication Eating less Skipping a meal Exercising too much The intake of too much alcohol Sudden/excess stress An acute illness Drug-induced hypoglycemia continues to be one of the most common diabetic shock causes. For those who medicate with insulin, it’s important to know how much your body needs. If you take insulin before meal-time but skip a meal, or decide to have just a salad, your blood sugar could plummet. This condition, also called insulin shock, can also occur if you take an overdose of insulin. But, that’s just one cause of extreme hypoglycemia. If you exercise too much or out of routine after taking your diabetes medication, it could push your blood sugar to an extreme low too. What Are The Warning Signs? Bear in mind that the symptoms of hypoglycemic shock may seem mild at first. But, they should not be ignored. If it isn’t treated quickly, hypoglycemia can become a very serious condition that could result in losing consciousness. Thus, one would require immediate medical attention. In worst cases, it can lead to diabetic coma and death. Some hypoglycemic shock symptoms: Sweating Shakiness Dizziness Rapid heart rate Extreme hunger Irritab Continue reading >>

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Quick And Dirty Guide To Diabetic Emergencies

Diabetes Mellitus Diabetes Mellitus is a systemic disease of the endocrine system resulting from the insufficiency/dysfunction of the pancreas. It is a complex disorder of fat, carbohydrates, and protein metabolism. Diabetes mellitus is potentially lethal, putting the patient at risk for several types of medical emergencies. It is characterized by a lack of insulin, or a persons inability to use insulin. In order to properly manage the numerous calls for diabetics, it is important for EMS professionals to have a basic knowledge of diabetes (DM) before dealing with the associated emergencies that may arise as a result of the disease. Diabetes is the seventh leading cause of death in the US, as well as, it is estimated that 5 + million US citizens become diabetic annually and don't realize they have the disease until an emergency arises. To truly understand the signs and symptoms of the various related conditions, we must first, comprehend some basic pathophysiology. The primary energy fuel for cells is glucose. Glucose is a simple sugar that accounts for approximately 95 percent of the sugar in the bloodstream after gastrointestinal absorption. Thus, it is the blood glucose level that EMS and other health care practitioners are most interested in determining. The key function of insulin (A hormone secreted by the beta cells in the pancreas) is to move glucose from the blood into the cells, where it can be used for energy. However, insulin does not directly carry glucose into the cell, it triggers a receptor on the plasma membrane to open a channel allowing a protein helper (through the process of facilitated diffusion), to carry the glucose molecule into the cell. As long as any insulin is available in the blood, is active, is effective, and is able to stimulate the rece Continue reading >>

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