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What Are The Symptoms Of Insulin?

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

A A A What is Insulin Resistance? Insulin is a hormone that is produced by the beta cells found in the pancreas. Insulin is an important hormone that has many actions within the body including those involved in metabolism (control) of carbohydrates (sugars and starches), lipids (fats), and proteins. When insulin resistance develops, tissues in the body – particularly muscle and fat tissues- do not respond appropriately to insulin. In fact, more insulin is needed to elicit the same response from these tissues. As a result, higher levels of insulin are needed in order for insulin to continue to exert its physiologic effect. There are many causes of insulin resistance, including a strong association with genetics (an inherited component). In addition, insulin resistance is often associated with the following conditions: infection or severe illness, the metabolic syndrome, obesity, pregnancy, steroid use and with other medications, and Aside from the well known association of insulin resistance with the metabolic syndrome, abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol levels, and high blood pressure; there are several other medical conditions that are associated with insulin resistance specifically. While the associations are clear, whether insulin resistance is the cause of these conditions is not yet known. While insulin resistance is usually seen long before diabetes develops, in cases in which medical attention has lapsed, insulin resistance can present as type 2 diabetes. The accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. The extent of liver damage can range from mild to severe. Newer evidence suggests that fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver, and possibly liver cancer. Insulin re Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

Tweet Insulin resistance is the name given to when cells of the body don’t respond properly to the hormone insulin. Insulin resistance is the driving factor that leads to type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes and prediabetes. Insulin resistance is closely associated with obesity; however, it is possible to be insulin resistant without being overweight or obese. Modern research has shown that insulin resistance can be combatted by treatment methods that reduce how much insulin the body is producing or taking via insulin injections or insulin pumps. Reducing insulin resistance can be achieved by following low-carbohydrate and ketogenic diets. What is insulin resistance? The role of insulin is to allow cells of the body to take in glucose to be used as fuel or stored as body fat. [282] It also means that glucose is more likely to build up in the blood and this can lead to too high blood sugar levels. When the body becomes resistant to insulin, it tries to cope by producing more insulin. People with insulin resistance are often producing too more insulin than healthy people. Producing too much insulin is known as hyperinsulinemia. Symptoms of insulin resistance Initially, insulin resistance presents no symptoms. The symptoms only start to appear once it leads to secondary effects such as higher blood sugar levels. When this happens, the symptoms may include: Lethargy (tiredness) Hunger Difficulty concentrating (brain fog) Other signs that often appear in people with insulin resistance include: Weight gain around the middle (belly fat) High blood pressure High cholesterol levels If insulin resistance develops into prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, the symptoms will include increased blood glucose levels and more of the classic symptoms of type 2 diabetes. Causes of insulin r Continue reading >>

7 Silent Signs You Could Have Insulin Resistance

7 Silent Signs You Could Have Insulin Resistance

Symptom of insulin resistance: Abdominal obesity iStock/as3d Obesity, and specifically abdominal obesity, where excess fat is stored in the mid-region, is an underlying symptom of insulin resistance. Because abdominal fat is particularly active hormonally, there is an increased output of those hormones, which impairs glucose tolerance. An insulin resistance diet combined with exercise can help combat abdominal obesity and reduce insulin resistance. You can try one of these home remedies to lose belly fat. iStock/as3d Sebum, the oil that lubricates the skin, is overproduced in those who suffer from insulin resistance syndrome. A diet rich in carbohydrates promotes this overproduction, causing enlarged pores and acne. Eating more fresh vegetables and lean meats and consuming less sugar can help combat this and other insulin resistance symptoms. Symptom of insulin resistance: Polycystic ovarian syndrome iStock/AndreyPopov Many women who suffer from polycystic ovarian syndrome have high levels of insulin, which causes their ovaries to make too much testosterone and other hormones. This leads to irregular periods and the growth of painful cysts on the ovaries. Controlling insulin levels is essential for balancing these hormones. This can also lead to fertility issues if left unchecked. Pay attention to these symptoms of PCOS. Symptom of insulin resistance: Hair loss in women iStock/Kwangmoozaa In addition to fat storage and regulating sugar levels, insulin helps regulates hair growth. Women who suffer from insulin resistance are prone to alopecia, or female pattern baldness. Women who lose more than the typical amount of hair per day, estimated at about 250 strands, should be checked for insulin resistance as this may be the root cause. These could be other reasons your hair Continue reading >>

12 Signs Of Insulin Resistance

12 Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Most people think about diabetics when they see the word insulin, but problems with insulin can occur in a number of different conditions, in people with normal blood sugar. You have probably heard of insulin resistance; it is a significant health problem because it’s associated with an increased risk of obesity, heart attacks, polycystic ovarian syndrome, cancer and other serious conditions. People with insulin resistance usually have excessively high levels of this hormone, because it doesn’t work properly. We are seeing an increasing number of patients who have been diagnosed with insulin resistance by their own doctor, yet they don’t fully understand what this term means. How would you know if your insulin level is too high? There is a blood test that can measure your fasting insulin, but it isn’t always reliable and many doctors are not willing to order this test. This is a shame because elevated insulin is bad for your health and shortens your lifespan. Insulin has many important roles in your body. People with too much insulin in their bloodstream are said to have insulin resistance, syndrome X, metabolic syndrome or pre-diabetes. They are all interchangeable terms. Due to modern diets and lifestyles, nearly everybody produces more insulin in their pancreas than they should. This is a problem because if blood insulin levels have been high for years, the cells of your body start to ignore it. The insulin becomes less and less effective at its important job in your body (getting glucose inside your cells so you can burn it for energy). Knowing whether or not you have too high insulin is important because it can allow you to make some changes and avoid some serious health problems in the future. Luckily there are several tell tale signs or clues that your bo Continue reading >>

5 Tell-tale Signs Of Insulin Resistance And How To Stop It

5 Tell-tale Signs Of Insulin Resistance And How To Stop It

5 Tell-Tale Signs of Insulin Resistance and How to Stop It As with any health issue, the first step in solving the problem is; understanding what it actually is. Well, usually food is absorbed into the bloodstream in the form of sugar, and then this increase in the blood sugar signals the pancreas to release a hormone called insulin. Insulin clings onto the cells and then removes sugar from the bloodstream so that it can be used for energy. In the case of insulin resistance, the bodys cells do not respond to the insulin as effectively as it should, which means that the sugar is not used for energy, which means that the body then stores it in the cells as fat. Some signs and symptoms of insulin resistance can vary from one person to the next, but the 5 most common and most concerning signs are: It is not yet known exactly how and why this occurs, but studies have clearly shown that the higher the blood pressure, the worse the insulin resistance. It is typical that people with insulin resistance have high levels of bad cholesterol (LDL) and low levels of good cholesterol (HDL). Having problems like atherosclerosis (the hardening of the arteries) and other heart problems can be a bright, flashing red light for insulin resistance and should be of big concern. Insulin resistance and obesity go hand-in-hand. This can usually be seen by large amounts of excess body fat, especially around the belly. Obesity and insulin resistance works in a vicious cycle where obesity can lead to insulin resistance, and vice versa. Protein in the urine is a sign that kidney damage has occurred, although this is usually not the first sign of insulin resistance. There is no set or simple test to diagnose insulin resistance. However, here are some of the factors that your doctor would consider wh Continue reading >>

What Causes Insulin Resistance? Lipid Overload

What Causes Insulin Resistance? Lipid Overload

Over the past year I have interacted with hundreds of people with diabetes, and have come to learn one very important lesson that has changed my view of diabetes altogether. This realization came to me early on in my career as a nutrition and fitness coach for people with diabetes, and continues to hold true. While insulin resistance is a condition that is most commonly associated with type 2 diabetes, an increasing body of evidence is now shedding light on the fact that insulin resistance is a common thread that underlies many health conditions previously unassociated with blood sugar, including (but not limited to) heart disease, diabetes, atherosclerosis, the metabolic syndrome, obesity and cancer. What that means is simple: insulin resistance significantly increases your risk for the development of a collection of health conditions that can significantly reduce your quality of life and decrease your life expectancy. Watch this video for a synopsis of the causes of insulin resistance: What is insulin and why should you care? Insulin is a hormone which is released by the pancreas in response to rising blood glucose. When you consume carbohydrates, the glucose that enters the bloodstream knocks on the door of the beta cells in the pancreas as a signal to make insulin. Insulin serves as the key that unlocks the door to allow glucose to enter body tissues. Insulin tells your cells “Yoo hoo! Pick up this glucose. It’s all over the place.” Without insulin, cells in the liver, muscle, and fat have a difficult time vacuuming up glucose from the blood. These tissues are capable to vacuuming up only a small percentage (5-10%) of the glucose in circulation without the help of insulin. When insulin is present, the amount of glucose that can be transported into tissues sign Continue reading >>

How To Avoid Insulin Resistance Womens Health Network

How To Avoid Insulin Resistance Womens Health Network

Insulin resistance is a syndrome at the center of manychronic and serious health problems, including diabetes, obesity, heart diseaseand polycystic ovary syndrome or PCOS. Insulin is one of the major hormones andit has a cascading effect on the rest of your hormones, including the minor hormonesestrogen, progesterone and testosterone. Insulin resistance occurs because, for many of us, most of our calories come inthe form of simple carbohydrates sugars that quickly enter the bloodstream asglucose. The body has to release high levels of insulin to keep all that glucosein the bloodstream from spiraling out of control. Over time, the cells simply cant keep up. They stop responding to the insulin signaland the body becomes insulin resistant. Now, the body is forced to release evenmore insulin because it cannot let blood sugar get too high. Having excess insulin in the bloodstream, or hyperinsulinemia, is a serious problembecause the body cant endure prolonged high levels of insulin. Too much insulindisrupts cellular metabolism and spreads inflammation. When your body is unable to keep blood glucose under control, it leads to diabetes,though that is only the most obvious disease caused by insulin resistance. Alongthe way, there are many other serious negative health effects that can happen beforefull-blown diabetes takes hold. Diabetes can then spiral into other health problems. You can stop this chain of events by making diet and lifestyle changes. You canstart by understanding how insulin can get out of balance in the first place. How imbalanced insulin contributes to other hormonal imbalances Since insulin is considered a major hormone, it can affect many other hormonesystems, including your sex hormones. A womans body in perimenopause is alreadytrying to manage the effec Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance

Insulin Resistance

What medical conditions are associated with insulin resistance? While the metabolic syndrome links insulin resistance with abdominal obesity, elevated cholesterol, and high blood pressure; several other medical other conditions are specifically associated with insulin resistance. Insulin resistance may contribute to the following conditions: Type 2 Diabetes: Overt diabetes may be the first sign insulin resistance is present. Insulin resistance can be noted long before type 2 diabetes develops. Individuals reluctant or unable to see a health-care professional often seek medical attention when they have already developed type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Fatty liver: Fatty liver is strongly associated with insulin resistance. Accumulation of fat in the liver is a manifestation of the disordered control of lipids that occurs with insulin resistance. Fatty liver associated with insulin resistance may be mild or severe. Newer evidence suggests fatty liver may even lead to cirrhosis of the liver and, possibly, liver cancer. Arteriosclerosis: Arteriosclerosis (also known as atherosclerosis) is a process of progressive thickening and hardening of the walls of medium-sized and large arteries. Arteriosclerosis is responsible for: Other risk factors for arteriosclerosis include: High levels of "bad" (LDL) cholesterol Diabetes mellitus from any cause Family history of arteriosclerosis Skin Lesions: Skin lesions include increased skin tags and a condition called acanthosis nigerians (AN). Acanthosis nigricans is a darkening and thickening of the skin, especially in folds such as the neck, under the arms, and in the groin. This condition is directly related to the insulin resistance, though the exact mechanism is not clear. Acanthosis nigricans is a cosmetic condition strongly Continue reading >>

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

Signs Of Insulin Resistance

What is insulin resistance? Insulin is a hormone made by your pancreas. It allows your cells to use glucose (sugar) for energy. People with insulin resistance have cells throughout their bodies that don’t use insulin effectively. This means the cells have trouble absorbing glucose, which causes a buildup of sugar in their blood. If your blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered type 2 diabetes, you have a condition called prediabetes caused by insulin resistance. It’s not entirely clear why some people develop insulin resistance and others don’t. A sedentary lifestyle and being overweight increases the chance of developing prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. The effects of insulin resistance Insulin resistance typically doesn’t trigger any noticeable symptoms. You could be insulin resistant for years without knowing, especially if your blood glucose levels aren’t checked. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) estimates that nearly 70 percent of individuals with insulin resistance and prediabetes will go on to develop type 2 diabetes if significant lifestyle changes aren’t made. Some people with insulin resistance may develop a skin condition known as acanthosis nigricans. This condition creates dark patches often on the back of the neck, groin, and armpits. Some experts believe it may be caused by a buildup of insulin within skin cells. There’s no cure for acanthosis nigricans, but if caused by a specific condition, treatment may allow for some of your natural skin color to return. Insulin resistance increases the risk of being overweight, having high triglycerides, and having elevated blood pressure. Since insulin resistance increases your risk for progressing to diabetes, you may not notice right away if you develop Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance: Causes, Symptoms And Prevention

Insulin Resistance: Causes, Symptoms And Prevention

Insulin, a hormone made by the pancreas, allows cells to absorb glucose so that it can be used as energy. The cells of individuals with insulin resistance are unable to use insulin effectively. When cells cannot absorb glucose, it builds up in the blood. If glucose levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnostic for diabetes, it is referred to as prediabetes. This page will look at the current understanding of insulin resistance and explain how it is a risk factor for both diabetes and other conditions. The article will also explain the signs and how it can be avoided. Contents of this article: Here are some key points about insulin resistance. More detail and supporting information is in the main article. Insulin resistance itself does not present any symptoms if it occurs without prediabetes or diabetes Blood sugar levels with insulin resistance are normal Insulin resistance alone is not treated, but preventing prediabetes or diabetes from developing can be achieved through lifestyle measures What is insulin resistance? Insulin resistance increases the risk of developing prediabetes, and, eventually, type 2 diabetes. Around 15-30 percent of people with prediabetes go on to be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes within 5 years, according to figures from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Similarly, the American Heart Association (AHA) say that about half of people with high blood sugar go on to develop type 2 diabetes within a decade. The AHA also point out that this means half of these people do not develop diabetes - "your choices make a difference." In other words, individuals can reduce their chances of progressing to type 2 diabetes in the future by making some preventive lifestyle changes. Not only that, but these steps can also Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Insulin Resistance? Does It Mean You're Going To Get Type 2 Diabetes?

If your doctor has told you that you have this condition, you're probably asking these questions. It means your body can't respond properly to the insulin it makes. Over time, this sends your blood sugar levels up. That can set you up for type 2 diabetes, as well as heart disease, but it doesn't have to. Exercise and a good diet can help you stay healthy. You can't tell that you have insulin resistance by how you feel. You'll need to get a blood test that checks your blood sugar levels. Likewise, you won’t know if you have most of the other conditions that are part of insulin resistance syndrome (high blood pressure, low "good" cholesterol levels, and high triglycerides) without seeing your doctor. If you already have insulin resistance, you can take actions that will help your health. Exercise. Go for at least 30 minutes a day of moderate activity (like brisk walking) 5 or more days a week. If you're not active now, work up to that. Get to a healthy weight. If you're not sure what you should weigh or how to reach a weight loss goal, ask your doctor. You may also want to talk with a nutritionist and a certified personal trainer. Eat a healthy diet. Think fruits, vegetables, whole grains, nuts, beans, fish, legumes, and other lean protein. Some people with insulin resistance may also need to take metformin. Continue reading >>

6 Signs You May Have Insulin Resistance

6 Signs You May Have Insulin Resistance

Insulin resistance and PCOS. You may have been diagnosed with the latter, but are not sure whether you also have the former. An insulin resistance test should be one of the first that your doctor does after diagnosing PCOS. Unfortunately, that’s not always the case… In this article I’ll outline some classic signs and symptoms to help inform you of whether you should be pushing for further testing. Of course, you’re smart women, you know this is not a diagnosis. I’m not a doctor, I’m a degree-qualified nutritionist. Even if I was a doctor, I could not diagnose you via a blog. You need to get a blood test done to know for sure. So, book one as soon as you can. What Is Insulin Resistance? Insulin is our storage hormone. When we eat, our body detects a rise in blood sugar (glucose). Our body doesn’t like blood sugar to be high. This is because cells can be damaged if it’s high for prolonged periods of time. These cells include those in the brain, liver, pancreas, heart, and eyes. Therefore, in response to high blood sugar, the body stores excess glucose in muscle and liver cells for later use. Insulin is the hormone that allows this to happen. It tells the cells to open up and let the glucose in. Insulin is excreted by the pancreas. It binds to a receptor on the cell and tells it to open up. This process is similar to the way a key opens a door. Insulin resistance occurs when insulin no longer works effectively due to chronic low grade inflammation. The key has been used too much, the lock gets worn and the key no longer fits. As a result, the blood glucose level stays high. The brain believes that more insulin is required. It sends a message to the pancreas to get it to make even more. However, the ‘lock’ is still worn so the extra insulin doesn’t hel Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

A A A Insulin Reaction An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sugar + emia = in the blood) caused by insulin or oral diabetic medications. (Please note that for this article blood sugar and blood glucose mean the same thing and the terms may be used interchangeably.) The terms insulin reaction, insulin shock, and hypoglycemia (when associated with a person with diabetes) are often used interchangeably. In normal physiology, the body is able to balance the glucose (sugar levels) in the bloodstream. When a person eats, and glucose levels start to rise, the body signals the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin "unlocks the door" to cells in the body so that the glucose can be used for energy. When blood sugar levels drop, insulin production decreases and the liver begins producing glucose. In people with diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to meet the body's demand. Treatment may include medications taken by mouth (oral hypoglycemics), insulin, or both. The balance of food intake and medication is not automatic, and a person with diabetes needs to be aware that too much medication or too little food may cause blood sugar levels to drop. Interestingly, brain cells do not need insulin to access the glucose in the blood stream. Brain cells also cannot store excess glucose, so when blood sugar levels drop, brain function is one of the first parts of the body to become affected. In an insulin reaction, the blood sugar levels are usually below 50 mg/dL (or 2.78 mmol/L in SI units). Continue Reading A A A Insulin Reaction (cont.) Insulin reactions occur when there is an imbalance of food intake and the amount of insulin in the body. The oral hypoglycemic mediat Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Causes And Symptoms

Insulin Resistance Causes And Symptoms

One in three Americans—including half of those age 60 and older1— have a silent blood sugar problem known as insulin resistance. Insulin resistance increases the risk for prediabetes, type 2 diabetes and a host of other serious health problems, including heart attacks, strokes2 and cancer.3 What is Insulin Resistance? Insulin resistance is when cells in your muscles, body fat and liver start resisting or ignoring the signal that the hormone insulin is trying to send out—which is to grab glucose out of the bloodstream and put it into our cells. Glucose, also known as blood sugar, is the body’s main source of fuel. We get glucose from grains, fruit, vegetables, dairy products, and drinks that bring break down into carbohydrates. How Insulin Resistance Develops While genetics, aging and ethnicity play roles in developing insulin sensitivity, the driving forces behind insulin resistance include excess body weight, too much belly fat, a lack of exercise, smoking, and even skimping on sleep.4 As insulin resistance develops, your body fights back by producing more insulin. Over months and years, the beta cells in your pancreas that are working so hard to make insulin get worn out and can no longer keep pace with the demand for more and more insulin. Then – years after insulin resistance silently began – your blood sugar may begin to rise and you may develop prediabetes or type 2 diabetes. You may also develop non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD), a growing problem associated with insulin resistance that boosts your risk for liver damage and heart disease. 5 Signs and Symptoms of Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance is usually triggered by a combination of factors linked to weight, age, genetics, being sedentary and smoking. - A large waist. Experts say the be Continue reading >>

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin Overdose: Dosage, Symptoms, And Treatment

Insulin is an important hormone used in medical treatments for people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. It helps the body's cells to properly absorb sugar. Insulin is a lifesaving medication when taken correctly, but an insulin overdose can have some serious side effects. This article explores signs of insulin overdose to look out for, as well as steps to take to avoid insulin overdoses. Contents of this article: Safe vs. unsafe insulin doses There are a few things to consider to ensure a correct insulin dose. Insulin doses can vary greatly from person to person. The normal dose for one person may be considered an overdose for another. Basal insulin The insulin needed to keep the blood sugar steady throughout the day is called basal insulin. The amount of insulin needed changes from person to person based on what time of day they take it, and whether their body is resistant to insulin or not. It is best to consult a doctor to figure out the appropriate basal insulin dosage. Mealtime insulin Mealtime insulin is insulin that is taken after a meal. Glucose (sugar) is released into the bloodstream as the body breaks down food, which raises the blood sugar levels. In people with diabetes, this extra sugar must be met with extra insulin so the body can use it properly. There are a few different factors to be considered in terms of the mealtime insulin levels. People with diabetes have to consider: their pre-meal blood sugar how many carbs are in the food they are eating if they plan to do anything active after the meal Then they must factor in their own level of insulin sensitivity and the blood sugar target they want to hit after the insulin is taken. The process can be complicated and, as such, there is room for error. Other variables There are also a few different types of Continue reading >>

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