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What Are The Disadvantages Of Using An Insulin Pump?

Insulin Pumps And Their Use In Pregnancy.

Insulin Pumps And Their Use In Pregnancy.

Abstract The prevalence of diabetes in pregnancy has continued to increase, both as obesity drives up the rate of glucose intolerance itself and as improvements in diabetes and infertility treatments allow more women with diabetes to become and remain pregnant into the third trimester. With this increase has come a concomitant increase in the number of pregnant women using insulin to control their blood glucose in pregnancy. This review seeks to identify advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in pregnancy, as compared to a more traditional multiple daily injection (MDI) insulin regimen. Insulin pumps have not yet been shown to offer superior glucose control compared to MDI insulin, and thus many healthcare practitioners and health insurance companies are hesitant to adopt such a practice; however, insulin pumps often facilitate ease of usage of insulin and promote postpartum insulin use when indicated. Although only a small percentage of pregnant women with diabetes in the United States currently use insulin pumps, we believe that insulin pumps may represent a superior mode of insulin delivery for many women with diabetes in pregnancy. Continue reading >>

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate Counting

Carbohydrate counting is a meal planning method that provides the patient with greater autonomy and flexibility in management of their diet. The method is based on the total count of carbohydrate consumed in meals and snacks. It is the most appropriate nutritional approach for patients with type I diabetes using the insulin pump or on multiple daily injections because, once the dose of basal insulin is established/set, the patient can adjust/administer insulin based on the content of carbohydrate to be consumed at a given meal. For patients required to take a set amount of insulin at meals the aim should be to maintain a regular daily carbohydrate intake. Why count carbohydrates? For two reasons: 1. Of the three types of nutrients present in foods (carbohydrates, proteins and fats), carbohydrates contribute most to the rise in post-meal blood glucose levels and as a result, are the main factor that determine insulin needs in relation to food intake. 2. Furthermore, equal amounts of carbohydrate, whether of short or long absorption, raise blood sugar in roughly the same way (1 gram of carbohydrate raises blood sugar about 3-5 mg/dl). This means that the quantity rather than the type of carbohydrate plays an important role and is a key factor in determining pre-meal insulin needs. Therefore, to estimate the amount of insulin needed for a specific meal or snack, one need only count the grams of carbohydrate in the particular food to be consumed. Once a patient has learned to count carbohydrates it is possible to establish an insulin/carbohydrates ratio on an individual basis. This insulin/carbohydrate ratio can be used to calculate the pre-meal insulin dose. How much carbohydrate to consume An exact quantity of carbohydrate cannot be recommended for all patients since meal Continue reading >>

Advantages And Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumping

Advantages And Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumping

Diabetes Pre-Diabetes About Pre-Diabetes Pre-Diabetes Overview Pre-Diabetes Prevention Metabolic Syndrome Overview Providence Journal Metabolic Syndrome Insulin Resistance & Diabetes Development Metabolic Syndrome Exercise Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 Diabetes Overview Type 1 Diabetes in Adults Latent Autoimmune Diabetes of Adulthood Monogenic Diabetes Why Glucose is High in the AM Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia Insulin Pumps Insulin Pumps Advantages and Disadvantages of Insulin Pumping Bolusing Exercise and the Pump Continuous Glucose Sensor Management Frequent Questions and Answers of Insulin Pumping Insulin Pump Resources Insulin Pump Travel Tips Insulin Pumpers Survival Guidelines Sick Day Guidelines for Insulin Pump Exercise Overview Exercise and Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 Diabetes in Adults A1c Overview Hyperglycemia Hypoglycemia Screening for Type 2 Diabetes Why is my Glucose so High in the Morning? Exercise Exercise Overview Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Overview Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Glucose Monitoring Glucose Monitoring Continous Glucose Sensor Overview Part 1 Continous Glucose Sensor Overview Part 2 Continues Glucose Sensor Companies Continuous Glucose Sensor Management Obesity BMI and Risks Obesity Overview Bariatric Surgery Overview Bariatric Surgery Website Polycystic Ovarian Syndrome General Information Overview Frequently Asked Questions Dietary Alcohol and Diabetes Glycemic Index Table Mediterranean Diet Reading Labels Diabetes Learning Resources Gestational Diabetes Mellitus Glycemic Index Snack Bars Healthy Snacks Breads & Pasta Nutrition Guidelines for Elevated Cholesterol Levels Portion Management The Dash Diet for High Blood Pressure Understanding Carbohydrates Unhealthy Ingredients Weight Loss Strategies to Sink Your Teeth Into What Continue reading >>

To Pump, Or Not To Pump?

To Pump, Or Not To Pump?

Your 10-year-old daughter just returned from diabetes camp. She said that everyone was using an insulin pump, and she wants one too. You are worried about having a tiny computer deliver insulin into her body. Should you ask your daughter’s health-care team about pumps? Your three-year-old son is a very picky eater and you are having a very hard time controlling his blood glucose levels, even with multiple injections every day. You have heard about insulin pumps, but is he too young for one? Your teenager has been using a pump for about three years. She is now on the cheerleading team and she does not like being connected to the pump because of how it looks on her clothes. Should she switch back to injections? These are all common scenarios for parents of children or teens with diabetes. If you’re facing a decision about whether your child should use a pump, this article may help by explaining some of the advantages and challenges of insulin pump therapy for children and teens. Pump basics An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that is programmed to continuously deliver basal, or background, insulin and that also allows bolus doses of insulin to be delivered to cover meals and snacks. The pumps currently on the market are about the size of a cell phone. An insulin pump is worn outside the body; no surgery is necessary for insulin pump therapy. Instead, an infusion set is used to connect the pump to the body. An infusion set consists of a small plastic cannula, or catheter, that is connected to a length of plastic tubing, which transports insulin from the pump reservoir to the body. The cannula is inserted into the fatty tissue just under the skin with a small needle, either manually or with an insertion device. The needle is removed after the cannula is inse Continue reading >>

Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumps

Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumps

There are many good reasons to use an insulin pump, but there are some disadvantages as well. Some of the disadvantages are: Insulin pumps can cause weight gain Can cause diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) if your catheter comes out and you don’t get insulin for hours Can be expensive Can be bothersome since you are attached to the pump most of the time Can cause a hospital stay or possibly a day in an outpatient care center to be trained on how to use a catheter properly With any option you choose you should always consult your primary care physician. There are many pros and cons to using an insulin pump but most agree that the pros far outweigh the cons. Have you decided to go with an insulin pump? Already consulted your physician? The next step is finding a pharmacy you can trust and count on. Mini Pharmacy has been in business for 30 years and has started out and still is a family run business. They specialize in carrying high quality diabetes supplies at the lowest possible cost. But they are much more than just a diabetes supply company. They always offer FREE home delivery throughout the Unites States same day or next day delivery. There staff is trained to answer any question you may have about diabetes. It is important to not only have the proper diabetes supplies, but proper care. Sometimes you need a helping hand. Mini Pharmacy is here to help you with questions, concerns or anything that might come up regarding your diabetic care. Mini Pharmacy wants to be your one stop shop for all your diabetic needs. For more information or just a friendly ear, call 888-545-6464 or visit their website for up to date information and free enrollment www.minipharmacy.com Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Therapy: The Pros And Cons

Insulin Pump Therapy: The Pros And Cons

Insulin pump therapy is used by tens of thousands of people of all ages who have diabetes. Many studies have shown improved glucose management outcomes for those using insulin pumps. While it does allow for more flexibility in your lifestyle and it does have the potential to even out the wide blood sugar fluctuations that are often experienced when injecting insulin, it may not be the right choice for every person. Consider the following pros and cons carefully and discuss them with your doctor. Advantages of Insulin Pump Therapy Bye bye, syringe: Insulin pumps eliminate the need for insulin injections using a syringe. Instead of giving yourself multiple injections with a syringe every day, you reinsert the needle for the insulin pump only once every two to three days. Fewer blood-glucose swings: Since you receive a continuous low dosage of insulin (basal rate) 24 hours a day, you are not prone to the rapid drop in glucose levels that can occur after insulin injections with fast-acting insulin. Using an insulin pump often improves A1C, showing that it keeps blood glucose in normal range. More flexibility: If your schedule causes you to eat at odd times or miss a meal occasionally, you can more easily adjust to these circumstances with a pump. Because pumps use fast-acting insulin, extra insulin (bolus) can be given to cover a meal with the simple push of a button. Less hypoglycemia: There are greater risks of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) with injections because you must take larger doses of insulin at one time. The continuous flow of insulin that a pump provides reduces the risk. This is especially helpful at night when injecting too much insulin could increase the risk of a low reaction during sleep. Easier exercise: You don't have to eat large amounts of carbohydrat Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump

Insulin Pump

An insulin pump is a medical device used for the administration of insulin in the treatment of diabetes mellitus, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. The device configuration may vary depending on design. A traditional pump includes: the pump (including controls, processing module, and batteries) a disposable reservoir for insulin (inside the pump) a disposable infusion set, including a cannula for subcutaneous insertion (under the skin) and a tubing system to interface the insulin reservoir to the cannula. Other configurations are possible. For instance, more recent models may include disposable or semi-disposable designs for the pumping mechanism and may eliminate tubing from the infusion set. An insulin pump is an alternative to multiple daily injections of insulin by insulin syringes or an insulin pen and allows for intensive insulin therapy when used in conjunction with blood glucose monitoring and carb counting. Medical uses[edit] Advantages[edit] Users report better quality of life (QOL) compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The improvement in QOL is reported in type 1 and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes subjects on pumps.[1] The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal needs offers relative freedom from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to control blood sugar with slow-acting insulin.[citation needed] Programmable basal rates allow for scheduled insulin deliveries of varying amounts at different times of the day. This is especially useful in controlling events such as the dawn phenomenon resulting in less low blood sugar during the night.[2] Many users feel that bolusing insulin from a pump is more convenient and discreet than injection.[2][3] Insulin pumps make it possible to deliver more pre Continue reading >>

Is An Insulin Pump Best For Your Diabetes?

Is An Insulin Pump Best For Your Diabetes?

Contributor: Shannon Knapp, BSN, RN, CDE If you have diabetes, you may be curious about insulin pumps, which deliver rapid-acting insulin as both a small, steady flow 24 hours a day (basal) and a larger surge for meals, snacks, and high blood sugars (bolus). The good news is that there is a lot of information available about insulin pumps. Also, many hospitals, including Cleveland Clinic, have classes for people who are considering them. Here’s how an insulin pump works: The device, which is about the size of a small cell phone, provides insulin through a small flexible tube called a cannula. The cannula is part of a tubing set called an infusion set. It is inserted under the skin using a needle, which is then removed — leaving only the cannula. Do some research and talk to your doctor if you are considering a pump because there are both pros and cons to using one. Here’s a rundown on advantages and disadvantages: What are the advantages of insulin pumps? You don’t have to give yourself as many injections. For people who require three to four insulin injections each day, using a pump can be a big benefit. With an insulin pump, you’ll only need a “stick” once every two to three days for infusion site changes A pump provides a very accurate delivery of insulin. This helps improve blood sugar control for people who have a hard time keeping it regulated. Some pumps have the ability to fine tune dosing to 0.001 of a unit! Those who use an insulin pump often have improved A1C levels. (The A1C test helps gauge how well you’re managing your diabetes.) This is usually the result of more accurate and consistent delivery of insulin. You may have more flexibility with your diet if you use an insulin pump. For example, eating five or six small meals a day can be inco Continue reading >>

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

The Advantages And Disadvantages Of An Insulin Pump

What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small, computerized device that delivers insulin continuously throughout the day. It attempts to mimic the normal pancreas's release of insulin, but you must tell the pump how much insulin to inject. It delivers insulin in two ways: a basal rate which is a continuous, small trickle of insulin that keeps blood glucose stable between meals and overnight; and a bolus rate, which is a much higher rate of insulin taken before eating to "cover" the food you plan to eat. Effective, safe use of the pump requires: Commitment to checking blood glucose at least 4 times a day, every day. Adjusting insulin doses based on blood glucose levels, carbohydrate intake, and physical activity. The main advantages of pump therapy are: Increased flexibility in lifestyle. Predictable insulin delivery. Precise insulin delivery. Ability to accurately deliver 1/10th of a unit of insulin. Tighter blood glucose control, while reducing the risk of low blood glucose. Reducing episodes of severe hypoglycemia. Reducing wide fluctuations in blood glucose. Helping manage the "dawn phenomenon." The main disadvantages of pump therapy are: Risk of skin infections at the catheter site. Risk of diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) from pump malfunction or absorption problems. Cost: pumps are expensive, plus the continuing cost of supplies. Checking blood glucose at least 4 times per day. Letting others know that you have diabetes. Is pump therapy for you? Ask yourself these questions: Are you ready to be attached to a device that lets people know you have diabetes? Do you have realistic expectations? It is not the "magic bullet" that will solve all your blood glucose problems. Are you comfortable with the technology and mechanics of operating a pump? Are you committed to c Continue reading >>

Advantages And Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumps

Advantages And Disadvantages Of Insulin Pumps

If you suffer from diabetes, then you may find one of the most distressing aspects of the condition to be the constant need for insulin injections. If you are a little shy around needles, or just don’t like the idea of constantly stabbing yourself in the arm, then staving off chocolate can seem like child’s play compared to having to constantly go through this rigmarole. Any alternative then might be quite tempting, and that might include the very alluring prospect of an insulin pump – which is a device that can administer insulin continuously via an infusion. Here you use a pump along with a disposable reservoir for the insulin and infusion set and then ‘let it do its thing’ for 2-3 days without the need for constant injections. Because the insulin is being administered intravenously it is faster acting and thus can provide more freedom for the individual in terms of diet and exercise plans. Of course this is done in conjunction with blood sugar monitoring and a controlled diet. Some of these pumps also include a ‘bolus wizard’ which can calculate the amount of bolus insulin needed based on activity, anticipated carbohydrates intake and currently active insulin. However, you know there’s going to be a drawback or two because otherwise every diabetic would be using insulin pumps. Here we will look at what those are, and measure the pros against the cons to help you decide whether this is a solution you’re interested in. Benefits of Insulin Pumps • Some report a better quality of life as a result of not having to use constant injections and due to the increased freedom that comes from the faster acting insulin • It makes it impossible to ‘forget’ or ‘lose’ insulin injections • Neuropathy (a normal side effect of diabetes) may be reduced or Continue reading >>

Pros And Cons Of Pumping

Pros And Cons Of Pumping

This page as a pdf file Discussion of the many advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump therapy Using a pump is not all easy going. Diana Maynard examines some of the pros and cons of insulin pump therapy: Advantages Flexibility of lifestyle. You can get up when you want, go to bed when you want, eat when you want. You are no longer tied down by having to do things at set times, or plan things such as exercise in advance. You don't even have to plan a stressful event in advance! Freedom with food. It is much easier to eat exactly what you want, when you want, because you just bolus as you go. If you're using Humalog, you can look at your plate of food in front of you, gauge the carbs and bolus accordingly. Or even eat first and bolus afterwards. Change your mind and have a second helping? No problem, just take an additional bolus. Buffet meal where you pick at bits throughout the evening? No problem, either increase your basal rate for a couple of hours, or take several small boluses as you go. Reduction of insulin doses. Unless control has been exceptionally good pre-pump, most people find they need lower doses overall once on the pump, typically about 30-40% less. This is because higher insulin levels create insulin resistance, and therefore improved metabolic control on a pump will generally lower the need for insulin (1, 2). No long-acting insulin. This is a huge benefit for many pump users. Contrary to popular belief, sometimes long-acting insulins do not get absorbed in a regular, predictable way, so that the level of insulin can peak and fall at unexpected times. The amount of insulin reaching the blood from injection sites can actually vary by as much as 25% from one day to the next (3). Exercise can aggravate the problem as it can cause a large amount of in Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps:types,advantages,disadvantages & Cost

Insulin Pumps:types,advantages,disadvantages & Cost

What is Insulin Pumps An insulin pump is a small device, computerized devices that some people with diabetes use to help manage their blood sugar, that is worn externally and can be discreetly clipped to your belt, slipped into a pocket, or hidden under your clothes. The insulin pump is not an artificial pancreas, although pumps can support some people achieve better control, and many people prefer this continuous system of insulin delivery over injections. The pump releases rapid-acting insulin into your body through a small, flexible tube (called a catheter) which goes under your belly's skin, to closely match your body’s needs: Basal Rate: Small quantities of insulin discharged continuously (24/7) for regular functions of the body. The programmed rate is managed by your healthcare expert. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin you can gain“ on demand” to meet the food you are going to eat or to review a high blood sugar. Insulin pumps become bolus calculators that assist you to calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are managed by your healthcare expert. During the time comes to choose an insulin pump, there are various options. The "perfect" pump differs by person. Factors such as weight, cannula insertion angles, color, special features, cost, and easy usage play a vital role in the selection process. Patient factors associated with infusion set preference include patient’s age, body characteristics, immune system function, activities, personal preferences, and history of diabetic ketoacidosis. Users describe the better quality of life compared to using other devices for administering insulin. The use of rapid-acting insulin for basal requirements allows relative independence from a structured meal and exercise regime previously needed to regulate blood Continue reading >>

Csii: Benefits And Drawbacks

Csii: Benefits And Drawbacks

Most patients with Type 1 Diabetes are managed with multiple daily doses of insulin (MDI), a combination of short acting analogue insulin with meals, and a long acting analogue to provide a basal insulin. Insulin pump therapy, or continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII) is an alternative method of delivery of this insulin, which more closely resembles physiological insulin delivery. CSII is indicated in certain situations as advised by the National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) in the UK. These recommendations are summarised below: NICE recommendations for initiation of insulin pump therapy.[1] CSII is recommended as a possible treatment for patients with Type 1 DM over the age of 12 if Attempts to reach target haemoglobin A1c (HbA1c) levels with multiple daily injections result in the person having ‘disabling hypoglycaemia' or significant fear of hypoglycaemia, or HbA1c levels have remained high (8.5% or above) with multiple daily injections (including using long-acting insulin analogues if appropriate) despite the person and/or their carer carefully trying to manage their diabetes. For children aged less than 12 – CSII can be considered if MDI is considered impractical The Mechanics of Insulin Pump Therapy An insulin pump is a mechanical device that delivers a constant small infusion of insulin which can vary hour by hour to meet individualised physiological needs. A short acting analogue insulin such as Novorapid, Humalog or Apidra is contained in a reservoir within the pump. The insulin is most commonly delivered via a flexible tube and a cannula which is inserted subcutaneously. This cannula remains in situ for up to 72 hours. There are alternative methods to deliver the insulin which are explained in sections below. The continuous Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Disadvantages

Insulin Pump Disadvantages

Tweet Save Not everyone with diabetes should use an insulin pump. Disadvantages of this device may outweigh the potential advantages. Insulin pumps require a certain degree of technical sophistication and are worn continuously, which can interfere with some activities. Since there are certain disadvantages, you should not switch to an insulin pump if you are happy with your current injection regimen. Insulin pumps are not ideal for every person or every situation. While there are several important insulin pump advantages, there are also many different disadvantages with insulin pumps. For many people, the disadvantages may outweigh the potential advantages. Specific Disadvantages Insulin pumps are not a good option for some people due to the following reasons: They require a certain degree of technical sophistication. People unaccustomed to using computers or portable electronic devices may have difficulty understanding how to use insulin pumps. You must still check your blood sugar often. You must still count carbohydrates or use some other method to adjust your insulin dose in regard to meals. Inserting the needle or cannula can be more painful than insulin injections, although you need to change it only every two or three days. The pump is worn continuously and may interfere with certain activities. Insulin pumps and infusion sets (the tubing plus the needle or cannula) are expensive. The pumps can malfunction and deliver too much or too little insulin, although this is probably rare if you take care of your pump properly and keep an eye out for problems. Tweet Save Although insulin pumps certainly have some disadvantages, they also provide some useful benefits. Although these devices are not right for everyone, many people find them an excellent way to manage diabet Continue reading >>

How Do I Use An Insulin Pump?

How Do I Use An Insulin Pump?

The Key to Using an Insulin Pump Successfully, Types of Pumps, Advantages and Disadvantages One of the keys to using a pump successfully is to dose insulin appropriately based on your personalized needs. Your diabetes care team plays a big role in educating you so that you feel knowledgeable and comfortable in managing your own insulin pump therapy. Prior to starting insulin pump therapy, your diabetes care team will: teach you how to program the pump to provide both continuous insulin (basal insulin) 24 hours a day and mealtime doses (bolus insulin). help you identify how many basal rates setting you will need, as well as what type of mealtime bolus will be the best for you based on the type of meals you eat. It may be best to give bolus insulin about 15 minutes before you eat to help prevent high blood sugar levels after you eat. show you how to count carbohydrates and advise you on the ideal quantity of carbohydrates you should eat. teach you how to prevent low blood glucose when using a pump and exercising. help you figure out the different insulin doses you may need for sick days. All of these factors will help determine how much insulin you need to take. Your diabetes team will also teach you how troubleshoot unexplained high blood glucose levels, as well as monitor for insulin pump delivery interruption and avoidance of diabetes ketoacidosis. Also, take the time to read the user guide that comes with your device. Each device contains important info that pertains to the specific brand and model pump. Below is an overview of types of pumps, with links to the user guides and other educational tools from pump manufacturers: Table. User Guides and Educational Materials for Insulin Pumps and Insulin Patch Pumps Company Pump Model User Guide and Educational Materials Tr Continue reading >>

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