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What Are The Chances Of Getting Gestational Diabetes Again

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

How To Avoid Gestational Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Four Parts:Determining Your Risk FactorsLowering Your Risk Through Medical ScreeningLowering Your Risk Through DietLowering Your Risk Through ExerciseCommunity Q&A Gestational diabetes mellitus, sometimes also referred to as (GDM), is a potentially serious condition that develops during pregnancy. Basically defined, gestational diabetes affects how the mother's body produces and uses insulin to control her blood sugar levels which can be harmful to both her and the baby. The good news is that GDM is can be prevented, or your risk for developing it at least minimized. There are no guarantees, but the more healthy habits you adopt before and during your pregnancy, the better you and baby will be. 1 Get a family history. The first step in preventing GDM is determining your risk factors for developing it. If it turns out that you are at high risk, then you and your doctor take steps towards lowering your risk and keeping you and the baby healthy. Before talking with your immediate relatives about their diabetic history, it might help to know the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes, is an autoimmune disorder, whereas type 2 diabetes is closely tied to lifestyle and eating habits. Your risk of developing gestational diabetes increases if a close family member, such as a parent or sibling, has type 2 diabetes. Talk to your family to see if this applies to you.[1] 2 Determine your other risk factors. Besides heredity, there are a number of other risk factors in that you should think about and bring to your doctor’s attention.[2] These include: Being overweight before your pregnancy. Being 25 years of age or older. If you developed GDM in a previous pregnancy. If you previously had large baby (9 pounds or more) or a stillbirth. A his Continue reading >>

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

Longer Term Implications Of Gestational Diabetes

If you become pregnant again If you become pregnant again, you are at higher risk of having gestational diabetes again. For this reason, talk to your doctor when you are planning your next pregnancy. You should be screened for diabetes before becoming pregnant again to make sure that your blood glucose is at a safe level, and as soon as you become pregnant you will need to monitor your blood glucose levels. "The second time round I didn’t eat chocolate, and getting out and walking was easier because I had a child. Worrying about it added a lot of anxiety to my pregnancy but I didn’t have gestational diabetes that time round." Prisha, mum of two Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes You are at higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in later life. This risk is highest in the four-to-five years after your gestational diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is a serious condition, which, if left untreated, can lead to sight loss, foot numbness and heart disease, as well as the risks associated with having a hypo. But there is a lot you can do to reduce these risks. Gestational diabetes is a warning sign to show what could develop in later life if you don’t take action. Have a chat with your GP about what you can do to reduce your risk. It is also worth knowing the warning signs (shown below). Visit your GP if you are worried at all. Signs of diabetes Feeling more thirsty than usual Needing to wee more often – especially at night Frequent thrush infections Weight loss Slow-healing wounds Feeling unusually tired Blurred vision There is lots you can do to reduce your risk, by making changes to your lifestyle. Even if you develop type 2 diabetes, you may find you can manage it through diet and exercise. So, whichever way you look at it, these changes can make all the differ Continue reading >>

Get Diabetes Again? Gestational, Healthy Weight, Blood Glucose Levels

Get Diabetes Again? Gestational, Healthy Weight, Blood Glucose Levels

Health Pages: / Health A to Z / Gestational Diabetes: Can I get diabetes again? Gestational Diabetes: Can I get diabetes again? February 22, 2018 By Cindy Schmidler Leave a Comment exercise habits.Shortly after delivery, your blood-glucose levels will probably return to normal and your temporary gestational diabetes will be over because you no longer have the placenta inside you, which was producing the insulin-resistant hormones. Your bodys natural balance of hormones and insulin should return. Because a few women continue to have diabetes after they deliver, your doctor will test you for diabetes between 4 to 16 weeks after your baby is born. Even if you do not have diabetes after your babys birth, you should get your blood glucose tested every year. Once you have had gestational diabetes, you have a 2 in 3 chance of getting it again and your risk for getting type 2 diabetes 5 to 15 years later rises to between 40 to 60%. The risks for getting type 2 diabetes for women who are obese are even higher. But there is good news. If you keep a healthy body weight and get regular exercise, you can drop your risk of getting type 2 diabetes later in life to a 1 in 4 chance. Thats a big improvement and worth the effort. Not only do your risks for diabetes decrease, but your overall health will improve. Blood Sugar Records are Important for Good Control The important thing is to keep regular records. You should keep records of your blood sugar readings whether you are using just diet or diet, exercise, and insulin to control your gestational diabetes. You can print this Blood Sugar Record worksheet to keep your weekly records or use a record book that your doctor may give to you. Most glucose meters come with record books. The important thing is to keep regular records so that y Continue reading >>

Avoiding Gd On Second Pregnancy??

Avoiding Gd On Second Pregnancy??

Hi I was diagnosed with gestational diabetes on my first pregnancy around 29 weeks. I am currently 10 weeks pregnant with my second and am wondering if anyone was able to avoid it on a second after they had it on a previous pregnancy. My dr says he will test me after the first trimester and around 30 weeks this time since I have a history of GD. It's not really something you can avoid. You can maintain a diabetic diet and still get it. I was tested at 12 weeks and failed, this is my second time. It's more about your hormones, but if you have had it before you are at higher risk. Like PP said nothing you can do to avoid, I've had it 3 times now, despite being in great shape, and eating extremely clean. (No dairy/soy/refined sugar/ processed foods/fast foods) anyway all you can do it practice a healthy eating habit now so if you do have it again you will be prepared. Thanks yeah I have heard there is a chance I may not get it this time so I'm just hanging on to hope I guess. I was diet controlled last time and I'm afraid if I get diagnosed early on it would be hard to control with diet the entire time. How far along were you when being diagnosed your second or later pregnancy? I had it first preg and was diagnosed at 7 weeks this time around. I was diet controlled last time and I really feel I was misdiagnosed this time. I JUST failed and only failed because I was so sick so I had to lay down the whole time and was told by the nurse my blood sugars probably weren't being processed as they would have had I been sitting. Whatever, I'll still follow the diet. My sister had it with her first, not with her second, again with her third then not with her fourth. So there's a chance! With 2nd and 3rd I passed my early tests and wasn't diagnosed until 26 weeks with first and 28 w Continue reading >>

Is Gestational Diabetes A Given, Second Time Around? Glucose Testing Results

Is Gestational Diabetes A Given, Second Time Around? Glucose Testing Results

Is Gestational Diabetes a given, second time around? Started by heytherek, Jun 19 2010 09:18 AM I had gestational diabetes in my first pregnancy and I am now 29 weeks pregnant with my second. My first baby arrived perfectly healthy, just had some low sugar levels at the start which were fixed pretty quick. Three weeks ago I had the two hour glucose test which came up negative and the doctor at my hospital was so surprised at the result, they want me to do it again in a couple of weeks. Has anyone had this happen? and is it a given that I will get the diabetes a second time around? My mother had type two diabetes so there is a family link. Hmmm I'm not sure sorry, but thank you for asking as I've been wondering about this lately too. I had GD with my DD aswell, but NEVER had a high level, no matter what I ate, and my DD was born perfectly healthy, 7 pound 3 and sugars totally fine So was wondering if I'd DEFINITELY have GD next pregnancy as I thought that was a given..but maybe not huh?! Best of luck to you, fingers crossed you don't have it this time, that would be wonderful Sorry you have to do the horrible test again though argh. Please let us know how you go with your next results, hope it's all good news! I had GD with my first pregnancy (no family history) but I didn't have it with my second pregnancy. I was a lot fitter before I got pregnant the second time, that might have had something to do with it although my ob said it's not conclusive. So there's hope!I was fully expecting to have GD again and had three GTTs (fun!!) to make sure, so I was pretty surprised to get negative results. I still ate a pretty conservative low GI diet while pregnant, just to be on the safe side, and my diet is still mostly low GI three years later. It's not a given, but there is a mu Continue reading >>

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

What Happens After Birth With Gestational Diabetes?

The healthcare team will usually stop any diabetes-related medication as soon as you have given birth. However, you or your baby will receive extra monitoring, and perhaps extra care, as a result of the gestational diabetes. Your baby after the birth Gestational diabetes can directly affect your baby’s blood glucose levels. That means that he could be born with low blood glucose. This could lead to serious consequences if it is not treated, but your team will be aware of these risks and will know what to do. He may also have jaundice (which is usually harmless if treated) and may also have increased risk of breathing difficulties. You will be encouraged to feed your baby within half an hour after birth and then every two-to-three hours until his blood glucose levels stabilise. Two-to-four hours after the birth, the healthcare team will test his blood glucose level. They will do this by pricking his heel to get a drop of blood for testing. Your baby will not enjoy this, but try not to let it upset you. The test is done to keep your baby safe. If your baby’s blood glucose remains low, he might need some extra help to increase his blood glucose levels, such as being put on a drip or being tube fed. He may need to spend some time being monitored or treated in the neonatal unit – especially if there are extra complications. However the hospital will try to keep him in the ward with you wherever this is possible. "I was an emotional wreck afterwards for a whole week, crying all the time. I didn't like seeing my baby with tubes in him and he had jaundice as well so we weren't allowed to go home. But now, he's fabulous; constantly crawling around, he's a really busy baby!" Aisha, mum of one You after the birth Your blood glucose should be tested before you leave the hospi Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes - Will I Get It 2nd Time Around?

Gestational Diabetes - Will I Get It 2nd Time Around?

I heard it's more likely that you will get it for the second time, but in saying that I didn't have it for my second pregnancy. I had to take that second glucose tolerance test, just failed the first hour, failed the second hour and the third I was fine, so I didn't end up with it. Like you, weight has never been a problem and I had a pretty good diet, not sure what I did differently that got me out of it, but it worked. But as I said it's not very common to skip it, but it's not unheard of. I didn't have with my DS, but I have it now. I figured something was up at 9-10 weeks and asked for the glucose test - failed miserably. Doesn't answer your question, but shows it can be different in each pregnancy. Best of luck - try the Skinny cow ice creams - 5.6g carb per icypole! or Bickfords diet lime cordial in soda water!! Yum. I had it with both pregnancies, and dont fit into any of the catagories to having it.. Doctors always wonder why i would get it but i do and last time had to have insulin but i had a nasty craving for Iced coffee!!! And i only JUST fail my GD blood test every time.. But your more likely to get it with every pregnancy.. Just take care of yourself and the doctors will help you along the way with whatever happends 8) Goodluck with your impending pregnancy. I am pregnant with my first and found out 3 weeks ago I have GD - I was guttered. Like Cheekie I was only just over the normal range and I manage it with diet. Fortunately i have had no cravings and just eat From what I have been told and researched myself on this issue you will likely end up with it again. Your placenta releases hormones and these hormones block to varying levels how your body reacts to insulin. Basically the hormones are know to block insulin uptake. I also came up just within the h Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Pregnancy Also Poses Later Risk

Diabetes In Pregnancy Also Poses Later Risk

Print Font: WASHINGTON — A type of diabetes that strikes during pregnancy may disappear at birth, but it remains a big red flag for moms' future health — one that too many seem to be missing. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. Roughly half of women who've had gestational diabetes — the pregnancy kind — go on to develop full-fledged Type 2 diabetes in the months to years after their child's birth. Yet new research shows fewer than one in five of those women returns for a crucial diabetes test within six months of delivery. That's the first of the checkups they're supposed to have every few years to guard against diabetes' return, but no one knows how many do. The research, by testing-lab giant Quest Diagnostics, is sobering because if they only knew, many of these new mothers could take steps to reduce their chances of later-in-life diabetes that can bring with it such complications as heart disease and kidney damage. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. "It's almost as if you got a preview . a window to the future," says Dr. Ann A Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

This pregnancy complication is more common than you might think. Learn who's at risk for it, how it's detected, and what can be done to treat it. For years, doctors believed that gestational diabetes affected three to five percent of all pregnancies, but new, more rigorous diagnostic criteria puts the number closer to 18 percent. The condition, which can strike any pregnant woman, usually develops in the second trimester, between weeks 24 and 28, and typically resolves after baby is born. If gestational diabetes is treated and well-managed throughout your pregnancy, "There's no reason you can't deliver a very healthy baby," says Patricia Devine, M.D., perinatologist at New York-Presbyterian Hospital in New York City. But gestational diabetes that goes untreated, or isn't carefully monitored, can be harmful for both mother and baby. Consult our guide for risk factors, signs of gestational diabetes, and treatment options. What is gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes, or diabetes that is diagnosed during pregnancy in a woman who previously did not have diabetes, occurs when the pancreas fails to produce enough insulin to regulate blood sugar efficiently. "A hormone produced by the placenta makes a woman essentially resistant to her own insulin," Dr. Devine explains. How does gestational diabetes differ from type 1 or 2 diabetes? Gestational diabetes affects only pregnant women. People who have type 1 diabetes, sometimes referred to as juvenile diabetes, are generally born with it. Type 2 diabetes accounts for 95 percent of all cases of diabetes in the U.S.; it occurs in adulthood, and is triggered by lifestyle factors such as obesity and lack of physical activity. What causes it? It's unclear why some women develop gestational diabetes while others do not. Doctors th Continue reading >>

Study Measures Gestational Diabetes Risk

Study Measures Gestational Diabetes Risk

Researchers Say Risk Increases With Each Pregnancy July 12, 2010 -- Pregnant women who develop gestational diabetes during their first pregnancy are at increased risk for developing this condition in their second or third pregnancies, a study shows. The study, published online in the American Journal of Obstetrics & Gynecology, also shows the risk increases with each pregnancy that is complicated by gestational diabetes. There are about 135,000 cases of gestational diabetes in the U.S. each year, and it affects about 4% of all pregnancies, according to the American Diabetes Association. In the new study of 65,132 pregnant women, those who had gestational diabetes during their first pregnancy had a 13.2-fold increased risk of developing gestational diabetes in their second pregnancy. Those who had gestational diabetes in their first pregnancy but not their second had a 6.3-fold increased risk for developing this condition during their third pregnancy, and those women who had gestational diabetes in their first and second pregnancies had close to a 26-fold increased risk for developing gestational diabetes in their third pregnancy, the study showed. "We found that women with gestational diabetes in their first pregnancy are at higher risk of gestational diabetes in their subsequent pregnancies, and the risk for gestational diabetes increases further with subsequent pregnancies," says Darios Getahun, MD, MPH, a research scientist/epidemiologist in the Kaiser Permanente Southern California Department of Research & Evaluation in Pasadena, in an email interview with WebMD. "This does not mean that women with a history of gestational diabetes have a 100% chance of developing the condition in subsequent pregnancies," he says. "Our findings suggest that women with a history of Continue reading >>

The Risk Of Recurrent Gestational Diabetes

The Risk Of Recurrent Gestational Diabetes

The Risk of Recurrent Gestational Diabetes You're more like to get gestational diabetes if you've had it during a previous pregnancy. Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . If you've had gestational diabetes , there's about a 45 to 65 percent chance that you'll develop gestational diabetes again during future pregnancies. Specific risk factors for gestational diabetes include: Race. Gestational diabetes is more common in African-Americans, American Indians, Asian-Americans, and Hispanic Americans. Number of pregnancies. The risk of recurrent gestational diabetes increases with the number of pregnancies you have. Insulin. If you needed insulin to control your sugar during your first pregnancy, your risk of gestational diabetes is higher. Your baby's weight. If your first baby was overly large at birth, you are more likely to have gestational diabetes in the future. Your weight. If you are overweight, especially if you weigh over 190 pounds before your pregnancy, you are at higher risk for recurrent gestational diabetes. Your risk may also be increased if you gain weight between pregnancies or if you eat a high-fat diet. What Can You Do to Decrease Your Risk of Gestational Diabetes? Although there is no absolute way to prevent gestational diabetes during your next pregnancy, you can decrease your risk. Some gestational diabetes risk factors like your racial background cannot be changed, but there are risks you can control: Your blood sugar. The American Diabetes Association recommends that women who have had gestational diabetes check their blood sugar regularly. Keep in mind that elevated blood sugar levels early in pregnancy can lead to serio Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes is high blood sugar that develops during pregnancy and usually disappears after giving birth. It can occur at any stage of pregnancy, but is more common in the second half. It occurs if your body cannot produce enough insulin – a hormone that helps control blood sugar levels – to meet the extra needs in pregnancy. Gestational diabetes can cause problems for you and your baby during and after birth. But the risk of these problems happening can be reduced if it's detected and well managed. Who's at risk of gestational diabetes Any woman can develop gestational diabetes during pregnancy, but you're at an increased risk if: your body mass index (BMI) is above 30 – use the healthy weight calculator to work out your BMI you previously had a baby who weighed 4.5kg (10lbs) or more at birth you had gestational diabetes in a previous pregnancy one of your parents or siblings has diabetes your family origins are south Asian, Chinese, African-Caribbean or Middle Eastern If any of these apply to you, you should be offered screening for gestational diabetes during your pregnancy. Symptoms of gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes doesn't usually cause any symptoms. Most cases are only picked up when your blood sugar level is tested during screening for gestational diabetes. Some women may develop symptoms if their blood sugar level gets too high (hyperglycaemia), such as: But some of these symptoms are common during pregnancy anyway and aren't necessarily a sign of a problem. Speak to your midwife or doctor if you're worried about any symptoms you're experiencing. How gestational diabetes can affect your pregnancy Most women with gestational diabetes have otherwise normal pregnancies with healthy babies. However, gestational diabetes can cause problems s Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational diabetes mellitus (sometimes referred to as GDM) is a form of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually goes away after the baby is born. It is diagnosed when higher than normal blood glucose levels first appear during pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is the fastest growing type of diabetes in Australia, affecting thousands of pregnant women. Between 5% and 10% of pregnant women will develop gestational diabetes and this usually occurs around the 24th to 28th week of pregnancy. All women are tested for gestational diabetes as part of the 24-28 week routine examination with their GP. Women who have one or more of the risk factors are advised to have a diabetes test when pregnancy is confirmed then again at 24 weeks if diabetes was not detected in early pregnancy. While there is no one reason for why women develop gestational diabetes, you are at risk of developing gestational diabetes if you: Are over 25 years of age Have a family history of type 2 diabetes Are overweight Are from an Indigenous Australian or Torres Strait Islander background Are from a Vietnamese, Chinese, middle eastern, Polynesian or Melanesian background Have had gestational diabetes during previous pregnancies Have previously had Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Have previously given birth to a large baby Have a family history of gestational diabetes Most women are diagnosed after special blood tests. A Glucose Challenge Test (GCT) is a screening test where blood is taken for a glucose measurement one hour after a glucose drink. If this test is abnormal then an Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT) is done. For an OGTT a blood sample is taken before and two hours after the drink. For many people, being diagnosed with gestational diabetes can be upsetting. However, it is important to remember Continue reading >>

Are You At Risk For Gestational Diabetes?

Are You At Risk For Gestational Diabetes?

Are You at Risk for Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes (pronounced jess-tay-shun-ul die-uh-beet-eez) is a type of diabetes, or high blood sugar, that only pregnant women get. In fact, the word gestational means pregnant. If a woman gets high blood sugar when she's pregnant, but she never had high blood sugar before, she has gestational diabetes. Nearly 135,000 pregnant women get the condition every year, making it one of the top health concerns related to pregnancy. If not treated, gestational diabetes can cause problems for mothers and babies. Some of these problems can be serious. Most of the time, gestational diabetes goes away after the baby is born. The changes in your body that cause gestational diabetes normally occur only when you are pregnant. After the baby is born, your body goes back to normal and the condition goes away. Gestational diabetes is treatable, especially if you find out about it early in your pregnancy. The best way to control gestational diabetes is to find out you have it early and start treatment quickly. Treating gestational diabetes greatly lowers the baby's chances of having problems. Why do some women get gestational diabetes? Usually, the body breaks down much of the food you eat into a type of sugar, called glucose (pronounced gloo-kos). Because glucose moves from the stomach into the blood, some people use the term blood sugar, instead of glucose. Your body makes a hormone called insulin (pronounced in-suh-lin) that moves glucose out of the blood and into the cells of the body. In women with gestational diabetes, the glucose can't get into the cells, so the amount of glucose in the blood gets higher and higher. This is called high blood sugar or diabetes. Get tested when you are between 24 and 28 weeks pregnant. Don't get test Continue reading >>

I Had Gd In My First But Not Second Pregnancy - How I Avoided It

I Had Gd In My First But Not Second Pregnancy - How I Avoided It

I thought I would share my story in case it may help other people who are going through the same thing. In my first pregnancy I was diagnosed with GD at 26 weeks with a GTT. My mum is type II diabetic. I was never overweight. My after meals levels weren't too bad but my fasting level was always high. By 30 weeks I was on insulin. I was very frustrated with the way my OBGYN was treating me because of my GD and the fact that I was on insulin. My sugars returned to normal 6 weeks after baby was born. By the time baby was about 7 months old my fasting levels were back to how they were during pregnancy. When planning my second pregnancy (first baby 2 years old by now), I asked advice from my specialist who recommended I start insulin before getting pregnant again because it is really important to have normal sugars in early pregnancy. Also 5mg folic acid (really important). For first five weeks of my second pregnancy I was using insulin to control my fasting sugars. My GP recomended a vitamin D level be taken with the other routine blood tests. It turned out that my levels were low and I started supplements. I also read an article (link below) that said changes in the bacteria of the intestines affect the mothers blood sugar so I started taking probiotics (acidophillus). I know that low vitamin D can cause diabetes and treating it can help insulin release. I am now 32 weeks pregnant with second baby and my sugars have been normal ever since I stopped insulin at 5 weeks. I strongly believe that probiotics and treating my vitamin D deficiency are the only reason I now have normal sugars and I am really looking forward to the rest of my pregnancy!! I would be interested in hearing from anyone else who may want to try this and who may benefit from it. Did anyone else here have Continue reading >>

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