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What Are Insulin Pumps Used For

Using An Insulin Pump

Using An Insulin Pump

NovoLog® has been proven safe and effective for use in insulin pumps in children ages 2 and older with type 1 diabetes and adults with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Many people with type 1 diabetes use an insulin pump. What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small, programmable, battery-operated device that delivers a steady, measured amount of insulin under your skin. You and your diabetes care team can program your insulin pump to deliver NovoLog® in constant “basal” doses throughout the day and “bolus” doses at mealtime. Insulin pumps may be helpful for people with diabetes who have more than one insulin injection per day, including some people with type 2 diabetes. Pumps provide continuous insulin delivery in small doses, similar to the way the pancreas naturally releases basal insulin. You push a button to release mealtime doses of insulin to cover food. They allow people with diabetes to take their insulin automatically, wherever they happen to be. Benefits of NovoLog® in an insulin pump NovoLog® is a fast-acting insulin that can be used for up to 6 days in a pump before it needs to be changed. The table below shows how often to change NovoLog® in a pump. Please be sure to check the instructions that came with your pump. Pump component Time frame before changing NovoLog® in reservoir Up to 6 days Infusion set and infusion set insertion site Up to 3 days NovoLog® in the pump should be discarded after exposure to temperatures that exceed 98.6ºF. Low rate of clogs in an insulin pump In a clinical study, NovoLog® was found to have a low rate of clogs when used in pumps. That's good news if you are already using, or thinking about using, an insulin pump. NovoLog® remains heat stable in pumps at normal body temperature (up to 98.6°F). This makes N Continue reading >>

To Gain Confidence, Should I Give Up Using My Insulin Pump And Switch To Injections?

To Gain Confidence, Should I Give Up Using My Insulin Pump And Switch To Injections?

Type 1 diabetic here, 50 years on insulin, 4 1/2 of them on an insulin pump. ( the following is not to be taken as medical advice or opinion). For me diagnosed at age 13, there were only two insulins available and urine testing. Treatment-wise life was less complicated but also less accurate than now. But still there was no real other choice to make in order to stay alive. I spent years denying that I needed the pump. I felt that I was dependent enough on the insulin injections, why make myself more dependent by having a machine ? Things reached a stage where 6 to 8 insulin injections per day were not providing sufficient control - I was getting hypo’s at night, a dangerous situation, I was at risk of being certified unfit to drive a motor vehicle. In retrospect, now 4 1/2 years on the insulin pump, I have been never so glad to be using it. The control is so much much better and I regret not adopting the pump sooner. Yes, I had to contend with having the pump attached to me. ( but how many people seem to have their mobile phone or other gadgets ‘attached’ as though there lives depended on it? ) I gave it nicknames, like murgatroid, limpet, koala baby ( the koala cub clings to his or her mother/father) etc. and risked sanity by talking to it. I learnt to avoid tangles and hitch ups of the tubing on door knobs etc, to automatically check from time to time that it was still attached, that the battery cap had not lost contact etc. To relieve some of these concerns I learnt to always carry spares of battery, reservoirs, needle kits and insulin etc. If I was still on insulin injections I would still be doing the same sort of thing anyway. Over time one learns to anticipate and plan ahead, hence the spares, the need to consider separate ‘stashes’ of gear when travell Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Tweet Insulin pumps are portable devices attached to the body that continuously deliver amounts of rapid or short acting insulin via a catheter placed under the skin. They are seen as a better alternative to insulin injections as they reduce the need for multiple insulin jabs per day and give the user increased ability to control blood glucose levels. Around 1 in 1,000 people with diabetes wears an insulin pump. What is an insulin pump? An insulin pump is a small device (a little larger than a pack of cards) that delivers insulin into the layer of fat that sits just below the skin (subcutaneous tissue). Because the insulin pump stays connected to the body, it allows the wearer to modify the amount of insulin they take within the press of a few buttons at any time of the day or to program in a higher or lower rate of insulin delivery to occur at a chosen time, which can be when sleeping. An insulin pump consists of the main pump unit which holds an insulin reservoir which typically holds between 176 and 300 units of insulin. The reservoir is attached to a long, thin piece of tubing with a needle or cannula at one end. The tubing and the bit at the end are called the infusion set. Insulin pump therapy is also referred to as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion therapy. How common are pumps? The UK Insulin pump audit of 2013 showed that: Around 6% of adults with type 1 diabetes use an insulin pump. Around 19% of children with type 1 diabetes use an insulin pump pump. Insulin pump therapy is offered to people with type 2 diabetes on a case-by-case basis, when a diabetes consultant with expertise in pump therapy believes strongly that it is the only appropriate treatment for a specific patient. Current research suggests that there is a small proportion of people with typ Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Since the first human trials of insulin pumps in the late 1970s, [1] insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), has been used for more than 30 years. As technology has developed, insulin pumps have become more user-friendly and smaller. Modern pumps weigh less than 4 ounces and are the size of a pager or cell phone. The number of patients using CSII has been increasing. The US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) reported that approximately 375,000 adults with type 1 diabetes used external insulin infusion pumps in 2007, compared to 130,000 in 2002. [2] The FDA classifies insulin infusion pumps as class II devices, which need more than “general controls” (ie, provisions that relate to controlling the quality of the device, preventing issues such as adulteration or misbranding, and tracking components and devices) to ensure reasonable safety and effectiveness. [2] As with any class II device, the “special controls” required may include additional labeling requirements, mandatory performance standards, and postmarket surveillance. [2] The chief benefit of insulin pump therapy is customized flexible basal and bolus dosing to meet patients’ individual requirements. Insulin pumps allow users to program different basal rates to allow for variations in lifestyle and bolus doses to allow for variations in diet. Insulin delivery via a pump is more consistent and precise than via syringe or injection pen. [3] There are newer electronics with complex algorithms capable of calculating insulin bolus doses necessary to maintain glucose level within a set range as measured by a continuous glucose monitor (CGM). Ultimately, this technology will likely lead to an “artificial pancreas” that automatically senses glucose level and its r Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin Pump Therapy?

What Is Insulin Pump Therapy?

Through the following simple questions and related answers, you can get an understanding of what an insulin pump is and how insulin pump therapy works, helping you keep your glucose levels under control whilst maintaining your lifestyle. What is a pump and how does it work? An insulin pump is a small electronic device, about the size of a mobile phone. It can be easily carried on a belt, inside a pocket, or even attached to a bra thus becoming virtually invisible to others and allowing a very discreet therapy. The pump can help you more closely mimic the way a healthy pancreas functions. The pump, through a Continuous Subcutaneous Insulin Infusion (CSII), replaces the need for frequent injections by delivering precise doses of rapid-acting insulin 24 hours a day to closely match your body's needs. Basal Rate: A programmed insulin rate made of small amounts of insulin delivered continuously mimics the basal insulin production by the pancreas for normal functions of the body (not including food). The programmed rate is determined by your healthcare professional based on your personal needs. This basal rate delivery can also be customised according to your specific daily needs. For example, it can be suspended or increased / decreased for a definite time frame: this is not possible with basal insulin injections. Bolus Dose: Additional insulin can be delivered "on demand" to match the food you are going to eat or to correct high blood sugar. Insulin pumps have bolus calculators that help you calculate your bolus amount based on settings that are pre-determined by your healthcare professional and again based on your special needs. What are the benefits of insulin pump therapy and how can it help you achieve better glucose control? Insulin pump therapy offers multiple clinica Continue reading >>

I Am Type-1 Diabetic And Use Insulin Pump To Control My Sugar Levels. Do I Need To Remove It While Passing Through Security Checks At The Airport?

I Am Type-1 Diabetic And Use Insulin Pump To Control My Sugar Levels. Do I Need To Remove It While Passing Through Security Checks At The Airport?

In my experience TSA agents in the US are well acquainted with insulin pumps. Removing it is your choice. But be prepared to be searched regardless if it is on your person or goes through with your bags. In the bag xray it may look like a dangerous device and you could be pulled for a pat down. If you wear it on your person you will be asked to touch the pump and then your hands will be tested for explosive residue. This test takes about 30 seconds. You will also be patted down. Basically, plan for a little extra time, but you should have no issues with TSA being unprepared or unfamiliar - just a little extra processing time for you. I wear my pump through security as I prefer to keep it on me rather than risk someone else grabbing my bag with it inside. Some pump brands state that the full body scan devices can cause the pump to fail though. So call the customer service line for your brand and ask them what their recommendation is. TSA does NOT require you to remove it. It is your choice. I do tell the agent at the body scan/xray that I have a pump before I go through. As far as I know the rules are the same for domestic and international flights. I do not prepare differently for the type of flight and I have never encountered a problem with either. Always carry extra supplies in your carry on and in your packed luggage. Keep a doctor's note with both stashes, most especially if you are traveling overseas. Bring twice as many supplies as you would normally use. Also, get an RX for Lantus and a pack of syringes in case of pump failure. Carry a shit-ton of glucose sources. I like Gu gel its lightweight and small. Find it on Amazon... Finally, when you call your pump company, tell them you are traveling and see if they will give you a loaner spare pump. This way if the pu Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Risks And Benefits: A Clinical Appraisal Of Pump Safety Standards, Adverse Event Reporting, And Research Needs

Insulin Pump Risks And Benefits: A Clinical Appraisal Of Pump Safety Standards, Adverse Event Reporting, And Research Needs

Insulin pump therapy, also known as continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion (CSII), is an important and evolving form of insulin delivery, which is mainly used for people with type 1 diabetes. However, even with modern insulin pumps, errors of insulin infusion can occur due to pump failure, insulin infusion set (IIS) blockage, infusion site problems, insulin stability issues, user error, or a combination of these. Users are therefore exposed to significant and potentially fatal hazards: interruption of insulin infusion can result in hyperglycemia and ketoacidosis; conversely, delivery of excessive insulin can cause severe hypoglycemia. Nevertheless, the available evidence on the safety and efficacy of CSII remains limited. The European Association for the Study of Diabetes (EASD) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have therefore joined forces to review the systems in place for evaluating the safety of pumps from a clinical perspective. We found that useful information held by the manufacturing companies is not currently shared in a sufficiently transparent manner. Public availability of adverse event (AE) reports on the US Food and Drug Administration’s Manufacturer and User Facility Device Experience (MAUDE) database is potentially a rich source of safety information but is insufficiently utilized due to the current configuration of the system; the comparable database in Europe (European Databank on Medical Devices [EUDAMED]) is not publicly accessible. Many AEs appear to be attributable to human factors and/or user error, but the extent to which manufacturing companies are required by regulators to consider the interactions of users with the technical features of their products is limited. The clinical studies required by regulators prior to marketing are Continue reading >>

Insulin Pumps

Insulin Pumps

Insulin pumps are an increasingly common treatment for type 1 diabetes. They can improve glucose control in people with type 1 diabetes but do not suit everyone. An insulin pump delivers insulin every few minutes in tiny amounts, 24 hours a day. It is usually about the size of a deck of cards, but can be much smaller. The insulin flows through a cannula which sits in the subcutaneous tissue (where you inject) and is changed by the pump user every few days. Basal (background) insulin is programmed to meet the pump user’s needs. The bolus insulin is delivered at the touch of a button to cover food or bring down a high blood glucose level. Only rapid-acting insulin is needed and provides all your insulin requirements. Insulin pumps reduce the need for multiple injections and give the user the ability to make smaller, more accurate adjustments to insulin delivery. Note: insulin pumps do not measure blood glucose levels, but some pumps can read the signal from a separate glucose sensor. What sort of insulin pumps are there? There are a number of different types of insulin pump and accessories. They vary in aspects such as weight; units of adjustment; whether they have tubing or not and battery life. A ‘tethered’ pump uses a fine tube to connect the pump to the cannula; the pump is worn in a pocket or clipped to a belt. A patch pump or micro pump has no tubing or a very short tube, and the pump is usually stuck on to the skin. The following suppliers currently offer pumps in the UK: Animas Advanced Therapeutics Cellnovo Medtronic Roche OmniPod A good document for comparison can be downloaded here. Type 1 Technology guide We have produced a family-friendly guide to type 1 diabetes technology, which highlights recommendations from NICE on treatments and technology for chi Continue reading >>

I've Had Issues Using My Insulin Pump In Public. Would It Be Nearly Impossible To Take Injections?

I've Had Issues Using My Insulin Pump In Public. Would It Be Nearly Impossible To Take Injections?

Writing this as a Type I diabetic ( not to he taken as medical advice or opinion): I have been there too. 46 years on insulin injections and 4 1/2 years on insulin pump. And i agree the pump is more discrete. I sometimes use my physician’s letter when maitre d and others object to the pump. - that letter says I cannot remove the pump ( ‘removal of the device may prove lethal’) and that it is a medical device, medical as in hygiene and sterility which I stress as very important. Can they guarantee that their restaurant bathroom is sterile ? And do they realise that diabetics are prone to infection and if I should contract an infection from the bathroom are they going to pay for my hospitalisation ? If they can offer a clean, discrete area for me to pump or dose that is a good compromise. I do my blood readings with the device as discretely as I can in my lap and ensure the sharps are safely stored afterwards. The same issue re risk of infection if performed in the bathroom is what I give any objectors. I try to avoid completely having to change the pump reservoir whilst out. Sometimes it is not possible to avoid it or one forgets. Also the inconvenience of an alarming pump, say an obstruction alert and having to problem solve this is tricky in social settings. When a pump alarm sounds I pull out my mobile phone as though I being rung whilst I switch off the alarm. Ideally I need a clean area to use to change the reservoir etc or solve the alert problem. Sometimes I can ‘retreat’ to the car, or I have turned my back and faced the wall to sort these things. I always carry spare reservoirs, needle kits, insulin, battery cap and reservoir cap ( and the call number for pump help.) For insulin injections the ability to be discrete is compromised by the need to draw u Continue reading >>

5 Reasons People Ditch The Pump

5 Reasons People Ditch The Pump

We hear a lot about the pros of insulin pump therapy. A diabetes educator shares some of the cons. Integrated Diabetes Services (IDS) provides detailed advice and coaching on diabetes management from certified diabetes educators and dieticians. Insulin Nation hosts a regular Q&A column from IDS that answers questions submitted from the Type 1 diabetes community. Q – I see studies show that people with Type 1 do better on insulin pump therapy, but I sometimes hear of people stopping pump therapy to return to multiple daily injections. Can you tell me why it might be better for some people to stop using a pump? A – There are many more choices for insulin pumps than in the past, and many of these new pumps come with new and powerful technological options to help you with blood sugar management. Many clinicians promote pump use as the best way to achieve optimal control. But is it really the end-all-be-all of diabetes management? As with everything in life, it comes down to personal choice and what works for you. It’s best to do your homework to evaluate if a pump is best for your lifestyle and blood sugar management needs. There are plenty of articles discussing the pros of pump therapy, but few that discuss the cons. To offer some balance, here are some downsides to pump use that have caused people to switch back to multiple daily injections: 1) Mechanical Failure Insulin pens and syringes don’t have mechanical parts – they will not malfunction or have errors. The more technology that is used to deliver insulin, the higher the chance that something can go wrong in a mechanical sense. It doesn’t happen often, but it does happen. I have had several pump failures in 15 years of pump use; all were detected by the pump. Pump problems can include internal errors in Continue reading >>

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Onetouch Ping® Insulin Pump And Meter Remote

Say hello to the OneTouch Ping® Glucose Management System The OneTouch Ping® is the two-part system with one thing on its mind: helping you perform at your best. When used together with the OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump, the Meter Remote communicates wirelessly to deliver insulin from the pump. Start the process to get your OneTouch Ping® System Our inside sales department will help you every step of the way. GET STARTED The OneTouch Ping® Meter Remote controls pump functions from up to 10 feet away, which means you can keep your OneTouch Ping® Insulin Pump under cover. With the OneTouch Ping®, you get great clinical performance* and features designed with your lifestyle in mind. Basal insulin keeps your blood sugar steady between meals. OneTouch Ping® System gives you a wide range of dosing options with a low basal insulin increment of 0.025 U/hr. Because how much you need is unique to you, OneTouch Ping® System precision is key. Superior post-meal control1‡ The bolus calculator designed by Animas delivers superior post-meal control compared to the Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard®. The bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® System automatically determines how much bolus insulin you may need to cover carbs eaten and/or correct a high BG. Pumpers using the automated bolus calculator in the OneTouch Ping® pump stayed in control longer—and closer to target range—than those using Medtronic Paradigm® Bolus Wizard® in a clinical study.1‡ Give yourself an insulin dose—and never touch your pump. The pump and Meter Remote can share information wirelessly, the Meter Remote can do more than just check your blood sugar. It is also able to control pump functions. Use it to calculate how much bolus insulin you need and tell your pump to deliver the dose, all w Continue reading >>

What Are The Advantages Of Using Insulin Pumps?

What Are The Advantages Of Using Insulin Pumps?

The Diabetes Forum - find support, ask questions and share your experiences with 250,009 people. Join the Forum A Insulin pumps have become very sought after by people with diabetes, particularly people with type 1 diabetes as they have a number of key benefits over injections, including allowing greater control over diabetes. Insulin pumps are not for everyone though and there are a number of disadvantages which need to be taken into account when deciding whether a pump will be right for you. Insulin pumps have a number of features which allow people to take firmer control over their diabetes as well as improving quality of life for those that have struggled on multiple daily injections. Insulin pumps require a catheter to be implanted every 2 or 3 days, which can be more involved than single injections but the benefit is that you have to do this much less often than the number of times youd need to inject. It also means you dont need to associate every meal with a needle. Because delivering insulin is less hassle on a pump, you therefore have more flexibility around meal times. Say you decide you want to have a dessert after all, you can go ahead without having to decide whether its worth the extra jab. If you decide to go dancing or have an active kick around, you can instantly lower your basal dose so you can minimise the chances of going hypo as a result of the exercise. On injections, if you decide to take part in exercise that you havent planned for, your only choice is to take on board carbohydrate and then make sure you do the right amount of exercise to balance the carbohydrate youve taken. If you dont get approved for a pump on the NHS then you have the option to fully fund the pump yourself. As pumps and the necessary supplies are not cheap, this will involv Continue reading >>

Can Insulin Pumps Work Better Than Injections For Kids With Diabetes?

Can Insulin Pumps Work Better Than Injections For Kids With Diabetes?

(Reuters Health) - Children and teens with type 1 diabetes who use insulin pumps may have better-controlled blood sugar and fewer complications than youth who inject insulin, a new study suggests. Type 1 diabetes is a lifelong condition that develops when the pancreas produces little or no insulin, a hormone needed to allow blood sugar to enter cells and produce energy. People with the condition usually have to test their own blood sugar level throughout the day and inject insulin to manage it; otherwise they risk complications like heart disease and kidney damage. Researchers examined data on 14,460 diabetes patients under 20 years old who used insulin pumps and another 16,460 patients who injected insulin. With pumps, patients were less likely to develop dangerously low blood sugar or a life-threatening accumulation of acids in the blood that happens when sugar levels get too high. “The study adds to the growing evidence of the benefits of insulin pump therapy, when applied appropriately, in the young,” said Dr. Roman Hovorka of the University of Cambridge Metabolic Research Laboratories in the U.K. Previous research has suggested pumps may help young patients get better blood sugar control than they can achieve by giving themselves multiple daily insulin injections, Hovorka, who wasn’t involved in the study, said by email. But research to date on how well pumps work to prevent dangerously low blood sugar has yielded mixed results, he said. All of the patients in the current study had been using either injected or pumped insulin for at least one year. Overall, dangerously low blood sugar known as hypoglycemia happened at a yearly rate of 9.55 out of every 100 kids treated with insulin pumps, compared with almost 14 children out of every 100 treated with injectio Continue reading >>

The Use Of Insulin Pumps In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

The Use Of Insulin Pumps In Youth With Type 1 Diabetes

Go to: Introduction Insulin pump (continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion [CSII]) therapy became more widely accepted for youth with type 1 diabetes (T1D) in the mid-1990s after the availability of the rapid-acting insulin, insulin lispro. Previously, pediatric diabetologists were cautious about pump use in children, particularly as a result of the threefold increase in severe hypoglycemia reported among intensively treated patients in the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial.1 Of these, two-thirds used an insulin pump at some time, and all used regular insulin. With advances in insulin development and in pump features, however, the fear of severe hypoglycemia associated with intensive diabetes management has diminished. It is impossible in this short article to describe all aspects of insulin pump care in youth (here defined as children 5–18 years of age) with diabetes. A more complete description, including our program for starting an insulin pump, is provided elsewhere.2 A consensus statement on insulin pump therapy in the pediatric age group may be helpful to healthcare providers.3 Table 1 lists some advantages and disadvantages of insulin pump use in children. Although insulin pump use is becoming more and more popular among families having a youth with T1D, it is not for everyone. In order for pump therapy to succeed, the youth as well as the parents must want the pump. Diabetes nurse-educators listed 12 other important factors to determine who should start pump therapy.4 They all agreed that doing adequate numbers of blood glucose (BG) tests per day was the most important criterion. Most pediatric centers require this for pump initiation, as this is not only a measure of compliance, but also a necessity for safety. Other criteria for initiation of insulin Continue reading >>

I'm Looking To Take A Break From Using My Insulin Pump Thinking I'd Like Injections Better For My Lifestyle. Should I Switch To Insulin Pens Or Vials And Syringes?

I'm Looking To Take A Break From Using My Insulin Pump Thinking I'd Like Injections Better For My Lifestyle. Should I Switch To Insulin Pens Or Vials And Syringes?

TID 50 years, 4 1/2 of them on a pump. The following is not to be taken as medical advice or opinion. In my place I would need to think very carefully why I would want to change back from pump to injections. My physician suggested the insulin pump as being the best option and it was for me. On an intensive regime of 6 to 8 insulin injections per day I was still experiencing night hypos at times and in danger of not being able to drive a car or perform my usual work duties. And do you know how time-consuming and a hassle 6 to 8 injections are per day, compared to use of an insulin pump, for a worse control outcome?? If I had a relative or girlfriend or other not fully informed person advising or pressuring me to give up the pump I would be offended and thinking that they did not have my best interests at heart. How dare they !! Continue reading >>

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