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Well Water Pump Smoking

Goulds Jet Pumps Overheating.

Goulds Jet Pumps Overheating.

Discussion in ' Irrigation ' started by jcom , Jul 4, 2008 . We have installed 3 Goulds 1/2 hp jet pumps this spring. J5 are the first letters in the model. All are used for psi booster pumps and installed in the utility rooms of the houses. Vendor recommended pumps so should be proper ones used for these applications. Pumps are using 1" supply pipe and 1" outlet. 1 1/4" to 1" bushing used on the inlet side. Two of three pumps get too hot to touch after running a few zones and start to make a lot of noise. These pumps are supposed to be wired for 120v from the factory, per our vendor. We checked the first one and it was wired correctly. We changed it out and all is fine with that one. We installed another two days ago and the owner called and said it is running hot and making a heck of a lot of noise. He said it sounded like it was sucking air or such. I am sure this one is wired correctly also, although I won't be going out until Monday to check it. Checking to see if anybody else is having trouble with these pumps or am I missing something? Is it the pump end or the motor end that gets hot? The pump end won't get hot if there is water flowing through it. Even trying to draw more water than the line or meter can supply still won't get the pump end hot. Only a now flow condition will get the pump end hot. So I assume it is the motor end that is getting hot. The motor is air cooled and also doesn't care if you are trying to draw more water than can be supplied. The motor will only get hot if you are letting out more water than the pump should produce, or if the air flow is impeded to the motor. It can also heat up the air in a small room so that it has no cool air left. Unless there is something wrong with the motor or pumps, your zones are too large for the pump or the Continue reading >>

Jet Pump Troubleshooting

Jet Pump Troubleshooting

Jet pumps can be used for several different types of applications. Whether you are using a jet pump to supply water to your home from a water well or irrigate a garden, crops, or landscaping, you will need to know some common jet pump issues and identify ways to troubleshoot to keep your pump in top working condition. Here are some common symptoms, possible causes, and corrective actions for maintaining a jet pump. If your jet pump will not start, there are a few possible causes: System pressure has not dropped to switch's "On" or "Cut-in" pressure. Fuse or circuit breaker in your fuse box or breaker box has blown or tripped. The pump's motor is set to incorrect voltage, or, voltage being fed to motor does not match the motor's rated voltage. The hose from the pump body to the pressure switch is blocked, clogged, or frozen or has come off one end. The pressure switch contacts are dirty or burned. The power wires are loose or disconnected. The starting component of the pump's motor has failed. Go down the list of possible causes to determine the problem with the pump. The zone valve may not be opening to allow water to move. Try checking or repairing the zone valve. Check all wiring, pressure switch, and motor to make sure there aren't any loose wires or connections. Relieve pressure from system by removing the hose from the pump body and pressure switch and see if you can blow through it. If you cannot, it's clogged. Remove whatever is clogging it and reinstall the hose. Are the Pressure Switch Contacts Dirty or Damaged? Measure the voltage on the motor side of the switch to see if the proper voltage is getting through. If not, replace the pressure switch. Check the voltage at motor (and/or pressure switch) to determine which wire(s) are loose and repair as needed. Has Continue reading >>

Well Pump Problem | Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel Diy & Professional Forum

Well Pump Problem | Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel Diy & Professional Forum

Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel DIY & Professional Forum I have a shallow well with a 1hp GE above ground pump. The first time I noticed a problem, the pump would try to start and then click off. A day later, the pump began working and worked fine for about two weeks and then the problem resurfaced. When the power was turned on, the pump would try to start, but would not put out any water. The pump also got extremely hot. Upon removing the end-cover, there were some ants and a little sand. After disconnecting the motor and cleaning it out, I primed the pump and the pump began working again. A couple of days later, the pump was still working, but the motor got extremely hot and I actually saw smoke coming from the motor after less than a minute of running, but was pumping water at a normal rate and did not make any noises. The shaft turns freely. At this point the pump puts out water, but heats up to the point where you could fry and egg on the motor casing. White smoke also begins to come from the pump. I also noticed a very small amount of oil (a large drip) inside the cap. jadnashua Retired Defense Industry Engineer xxx Retired Systems engineer for defense industry. Make sure the voltage to the motor is within the specs when it is running. If the relay contacts are burned a little, sometimes the relay will not supply the proper voltage and this will cause the pump to overheat, if it runs at all. If you want th epump to last, figure out why it is getting so hot, or you will be buying a new one. IAfter disconnecting the motor and cleaning it out, I primed the pump and the pump began working again. A couple of days later, the pump was still working, but the motor got extremely hot and I actually saw smoke coming from the motor after less than a minute of running, but was Continue reading >>

How To Tell When A Pressure Switch To A Well Pump Is Gone

How To Tell When A Pressure Switch To A Well Pump Is Gone

How to Tell When a Pressure Switch to a Well Pump Is Gone 2011-02-14How to Tell When a Pressure Switch to a Well Pump Is Gone The pressure switch is an integral part of a private home well pump's system. The pressure switch controls the operation of the well pump, which delivers water to the household. The pressure switch is composed of an internal spring mechanism that is directly connected to a set of electrical contacts. Over time, the spring mechanism weakens, along with an electrical malfunction of the contacts. Shut off the electricity to the well pump system. Switch off the circuit breaker or remove the fuses that supply the electrical power. Access the switch mechanism by removing the cover to the pressure switch. Turn the top screw cap in a counterclockwise direction with the plumbing pliers. The switch is directly connected to the plumbing pipe system of the water well. A set of wires also enters and exits the switch. Feel under the switch housing for leaking water or water leaking from the mechanism itself. If water is leaking under the switch's plumbing connection, fit the jaws of the plumber's pliers on the brass fitting. Turn the switch one revolution clockwise to tighten it. If water is leaking from the internal mechanism, the switch is bad. Observe the two sets of electrical contacts and the screw terminals that connect the wires. If the contacts are held open and there is no water pressure, attempt to cycle the switch by pulling the contacts open. This may dislodge the internal spring. If the switch closes, turn the power back on. If the contacts remain open, and there is no water pressure, the switch is bad. Allow the pump to fully cycle by opening a nearby water faucet. Do not touch any part of the switch while it is energized. If the switch opens an Continue reading >>

My Car Has White Smoke Coming From Under The Hood

My Car Has White Smoke Coming From Under The Hood

My car has white smoke coming from under the hood jml4life you wanna say that to my face!!!! Just started today when I was driving home. When I was driving nothing happened and when I was idle smoke would come out from around the coolant part of my car. Had a burnt smell to it. Took it to a car place just a little while ago and it was smoking when I got out and I told them what was going on and a guy came out and looked under the hood. I started the car and expected the white smoke to come out and of course it didn't. My coolant seemed really low and he added some and I went on my way. It has happened since and the coolant level hasn't gone down so I'm thinking it's the engine. Help car guys! Check your thermostat is cycling fluid correctly, or it could be a head gasket or probably a leaky coolant pipe. two of those are a cheap fix, the other is not. IheartNintendo Isn't it good? Norwegian wood. Water. Also might need oil. Worst case scenario you have a busted hose and the coolant is leaking out. You have a leak somewhere. You need the mechanic to look further into it. check the weep hole for the water pump (harder now that it can be under a cover for the timing belt). Check the radiator for any damage as well as hoses. Overheating your engine, driving longer than you should once the steam starts, means further engine damage such as warped heads. That means coolant can be entering the oil. Check that to see if it looks like a chocolate milkshake. If so, you have already done damage and need to have major engine work done. jml4life you wanna say that to my face!!!! Water. Also might need oil. Worst case scenario you have a busted hose and the coolant is leaking out. I did check my oil just a bit ago and it was good. Just be glad it's not that evil black smoke that likes Continue reading >>

Is Your Heat Pump Smoking!?

Is Your Heat Pump Smoking!?

Yes, I think I have an emergency, a customer says. What seems to be the problem? says the technician. My outdoor unit is smoking, says the customer. There is steam or smoke coming from the top of the unit! Is it going to explode? No, it isnt! Its January in Florida and the mercury plunged overnight. When weather extremes hit us, some comfort systems struggle to keep up with demand. In this area, many homeowners have opted for the ultra efficient heat pump technology. It provides energy-efficient cooling and heating and is a great option for a comfort system. Many times, we receive calls from customers just like theexample above who are concerned about steam coming from the top of their heat pump when it is really cold outside. Thats really part of normal operation of a heat pump system. Heat pumps work by extracting heat out of the air and exchanging it to alter the temperature of the conditioned space. Sounds simple, right? Well, it works well until the outdoor temperature drops to near freezing. When that happens, the unit outside can actually freeze! The engineers behind AC systems have figured that out too: they invented a defrost mode for the unit. To explain it very simply, the unit actually reverses the cycle and turns the air conditioning on for a few minutes to defrost the outdoor unit. Inside, you shouldnt feel it; in fact, you should stay nice and cozy thanks to your auxiliary strip heater inside the air handling unit. It powers up and offsets the cold air so you and your family stay warm. Meanwhile, the defrost cycle completes and the outdoor unit becomes a heat pump again, but during the cycle, if you happen to be standing outside, your unit might steam a little! Its perfectly normal in these conditions. Do you have any specific questions? Click on our ask Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Sump Pump Failure And What To Do

7 Causes Of Sump Pump Failure And What To Do

7 Causes of Sump Pump Failure and What to Do If you have a basement in Indiana, then you know all about sump pumps . The problem is that these things fail all the time. While its not to say that we have a fool-proof method for preventing 100% of failures, there are certainly some tips you can follow to better your chances of a properly working sump pump. For years, sump pumps have been a pretty common fixture in homes, especially in lower-level areas of the country or in places where the rapid melting of heavy snow can cause flooded basements. The popularity of sump pumps have grown exponentially in the past couple decades, largely in part to a legal amendment to the US Federal Clean Water Act in 1987 that requires certain homes to have a sump pump, even if they are not necessarily high-risk for floods. The American Society of Home Inspectors actually did a study that showed more than 60% of American homes suffer from underground wetness or water damage . And theres a liklihood that an ever large percentage will deal with a flooded basement at some point. Something we often talk about with roofing in terms of moisture also applies here. It doesnt always take a large amount of water to create a large amount of issues. In roofing, we talk about roof leaks going into the home which arent uncommon for a faulty roof after a big rain storm. But just as problematic or sometimes even worse are the small leaks that get into the attic and arent noticed until well after a huge mold problem has been created. Same goes for moisture in the lower levels of your home. It doesnt take a huge flood to cause thousands of dollars in damage. It takes very little standing water and very little time for mold and mildew to take over and create problems. Proper maintenance is the key. Ugh, more Continue reading >>

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make a habit of switching water/well pump pressure switch Being a new homeowner is like being a parent. More often than not, you learn as you go. When we moved to our home outside the city limits, we knew little about water wells, let alone something called a water pump pressure switch or well pump switch. The device, which connects to the plumbing, regulates the home's water supply. When the water pressure drops to a certain level, the switch senses more water is needed, and spring-loaded electrical parts make contact, turning on the well pump. When the pressure returns to a preset level and the well tank is filled, the electrical contacts separate, and the well pump turns off. Without a properly functioning water pump pressure switch, there is no water. Thirsty? Ready to boil water for pasta? The tap will be dry. Load of dirty dishes or laundry to do? They'll have to wait. Need to flush? You'll likely be able to if the toilet tank is full -- but only once. And because we have geothermal heating , which relies on a steady supply of water, our house would have no heat. So we'd be firing up the wood stove, plugging in some electric space heaters or wearing layers of warm clothing. Over time, the electrical contacts in the water pressure switch deteriorate and no longer make contact. As a result, the well pump doesn't turn on, and you're left high and dry. C. Early on a weekday morning, before anyone has had a shower. This time of year, most people are changing the batteries in their smoke detectors -- or should be. To make sure the water keeps flowing, we'll be changing the water pressure switch on our well, too. If you attempt to replace the switch, don't forget to first warn your family -- unless you get some warped sense of pleasure in hearing their an Continue reading >>

Diagnostic Guide To Well Pump Problems

Diagnostic Guide To Well Pump Problems

WATER PUMP PROBLEM DIAGNOSTIC TABLE - CONTENTS: Diagnostic checklist in table form provices water pump problem identification, diagnostic steps, and repair steps. Deep-well Two Line Jet Pumps & Drinking Water Wells, Well Problems & Repair Advice. Shallow-well pump diagnosis and repair guide and checklist. What types of wells use a two-line jet pump for water delivery. Electric pump motor troubleshooting guide InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website. This article provides a table of diagnostic checks and procedures for fixing well water pump problems. We also provide a MASTER INDEX to this topic, or you can try the page top or bottom SEARCH BOX as a quick way to find information you need. Green links show where you are. Copyright 2017 InspectApedia.com, All Rights Reserved. Well Pump Troubleshooting Diagnostic Guide Things to Check if the Well Pump Will Not Start Check that all service switches for the equipment are in the "on" position. Check for voltage at the pump motor or pump controls. If no voltage is found, check for voltage at the electric panel. If power is on to the building, check fuse or circuit breaker serving the electric motor that won't run. Check for local reset button on the motor (popped out = off ) Check for other power reset or power off buttons such as an access door compartment safety switch that turns off power to the equipment (found on A/C blower compartment doors) Replace bad fuse. Reset circuit breaker; if necessary replace bad circuit breaker. Let hot electric motor cool down, then push in its reset button. Be sure all safety interlock switches such as on compartment doors are depressed and that the doors are securely shut. Replace bad or dama Continue reading >>

My Shallow Well Pump Started Smoking, Then Blew The Fuse In The Breaker Box (old Fashioned 30 Amp Fuses)? | Yahoo Answers

My Shallow Well Pump Started Smoking, Then Blew The Fuse In The Breaker Box (old Fashioned 30 Amp Fuses)? | Yahoo Answers

My shallow well pump started smoking, then blew the fuse in the breaker box (old fashioned 30 amp fuses)? The wires that run from the breaker box to the pump are kind of loose, and I thought maybe the cat had hit the wire (it's fascinated when the pump kicks on) and the wires may have touched. If I replaced the fuse, will the pump work again? Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Remember...Motors actually operate with smoke. The electricity is just there to keep the smoke in. If there is a problem with the electricity, the smoke gets out and the motor quits. Seriously though...Because the pump smoked, it is probably shot. This is probably the reason the fuse blew. It did its job and tried to save the wire from becoming overloaded. If the fusebox is still serviceable, just replace the fuse (after replacing the pump). The suggestion to get it changed to a breaker box is not a bad idea though. Double check the ratings on the pump and controller (if applicable). Even if this is a 120 volt pump (most that I see are 240 volt), 30 amps seems high. Most are rated for 15 or 20 amps maximum. If this is the case, go with the appropriate lower fuse size. It is very possible that your fuse was too large and did not save your pump. Next time the pump has a problem, the fuse may blow in time to save it. This may allow for repair rather than replacement. Continue reading >>

Water Terms Glossary

Water Terms Glossary

Don't know what a specific term or abbreviation means? Check out our list of commonly used industry terms below for help. A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N | O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z 60 cycle OR 60 hertz power - This uniform waveform, when applied to a set of coils of wire, sets up a magnetic field that changes from positive to negative 60 times a second. Abrasion Hazard - A sharp or rough surface that could scrape the skin upon contact or through normal activity. Absolute Filter Rating - Filter rating meaning that 99.9 percent of essentially all of the particles larger than a specified micron rating will be trapped on or within the filter. Absolute Pressure - Pressure above zero pounds per square inch. Absorption - The process of one substance actually penetrating into the structure of another substance. This is different from adsorption in which one substance adheres to the surface of another. AC - Alternating Current - The vibration of electrons to push an electric charge. Acceleration - The rate at which velocity changes. Accessible - Easily exposed for inspection and the replacement of materials and/or parts with the use of tools. Acidic - The condition of water or soil, which contains a sufficient amount of acid substances to lower the pH below 7.0. Across the line starting of a motor - When the pump turns on, the full locked rotor amperage is drawn to start the motor. Action Level - The level of lead or copper which, if exceeded, triggers treatment or other requirements that a water system must follow. Activated Carbon - A form of elemental carbon whose particles have large surface area with adsorptive qualities, primarily used to remove chlorine, objectionable tastes and odors and numerous toxic organic compounds from wa Continue reading >>

Shallow Well Pump Overheating

Shallow Well Pump Overheating

I have a 3/4 HP shallow well jet pump that runs my sprinkler system. It was new two years ago, but last fall I noticed it stopped pumping water when my grass was dying. I ran it during the day and it kicked on then off, and then it overheated and started to smoke. It is in the ground, so I am thinking maybe sand got sucked into the vents on the bottom. I took an air compressor and blew the casing out as best I could without taking the pump out. I ran it again and it kicked on, then off after 5 secs. I smelled it getting hot again, and shut it off. I need to take the motor off to bring it in somewhere, but not sure how. The motor is bolted to the impellar with four bolts. Do I just take them out and pull the motor from the impellar? What do you think the problem is, and will I need another motor? If so, what should I replace it with, or should I get it fixed? Sounds like the mnotor is fried. Once the smoke comes out you can't get it back in. It could be stuck on the starter windings. There is centrifugal switch that disconnects the start windings after the pump reaches speed. If it doesn't disconnect you will get overheating. usually takes more the 10 seconds though. What should I do then? Bring it in to someone and have them make sure it's fried? Also, should I just get a new one if it is dead? What kind do you recommend, and where can I buy one? I agree with joed that the motor is already gone. The thermal overloads are shutting it down, which is usually a result of bad windings, or as joed pointed out, the start windings aren't dropping out. There are three "big" parts to a jetpump. One is the motor, the next is a adaptor that connects the motor to the pump head, and the pump head. There's usually four bolts (sometimes six) that bolts the adapter to the pump head. Ta Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems

Troubleshooting Residential Submersible Pump Systems Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Why is it that residential deep well submersible pump system malfunctions are notoriously hard to diagnose? For one, a pump/motor assembly suspended 10 feet from the bottom of a 300-foot well brings new meaning to the word inaccessible. The symptoms also have a troublesome way of overlapping so that precise diagnosis can be elusive at first. Invariably, however, persistence and logic prevail for skilled electricians. Photo 1. This type of submersible pump control box contains a capacitor, relay, and associated electronics. In this article, we'll take a look at the 3-wire 240V single-phase submersible pump system for drinking water applications, typically set between 50 feet and 300 feet below grade. The pump is fed down a steel well casing that extends through the earth until bedrock is encountered at which point the rock itself becomes the casing. A 3-wire system (actually there is a fourth equipment ground conductor that is not counted in the number of wires) implies there is a control box inside the house, containing a large electrolytic capacitor, microprocessor, and other electronics (Photo 1). In contrast, a 2-wire system omits the in-house controller so that the capacitor is inside the hermetically sealed underwater motor. Although this arrangement makes for a cheaper initial installation, when it comes to repa Continue reading >>

White Smoke From Water Pump / Oil Cooler Area?? (with Video)

White Smoke From Water Pump / Oil Cooler Area?? (with Video)

White smoke from water pump / oil cooler area?? (with video) Happy Independence Day and hello from Thailand. I just got 1982 RHD 944NA with about 60,xxx KM about one month ago. I dont know when was the last timing belt change, but I plan to change it immediately when I get my water pump kit from the State. I recently have white smoke coming from water pump/oil cooler area and I need your help to identify the source of the problem. Here is the story. I try to explain in detail, so it might be long. Overheated: The engine seems to run perfectly, until I got overheated last week. It was in redline for a minute and I pulled out just in time (I hope). Coolant was shooting out from the reservoir overflow connector. My car did not have the overflow hose, so the coolant was shouting out all over my engine bay. I waited for almost an hour for the engine to cool down, refilled reservoir with drinking water and drove about 10KM back home. I have to stop 1 time on the way back because the temperature started to pass mark. I shut down the engine again and saw coolant shooting out but not as bad as the first time. The coolant color was brown and feels a little muddy like it hadnt been change for years. I think there was no oil mixing in there though. Finally my car is sitting safely in my garage. Clogged Radiator: I drained my radiator next morning (opened both radiator drain plug and engine block drain screw), and found out that there're many solid deposits in my water cool system. I think this might have clogged my radiator and caused the over heated problem. Also, I found out that my car was running without thermostat. I then used 15 minutes radiator cleaner to clean all the deposit in my system. I flushed my system with plain water many many times until the drained water was cry Continue reading >>

Honda - Car Over Heating And White Smoke Coming Out Of The Hood - Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange

Honda - Car Over Heating And White Smoke Coming Out Of The Hood - Motor Vehicle Maintenance & Repair Stack Exchange

car over heating and white smoke coming out of the hood I have a 98 Honda civic that I bought a few months ago. It has an after market fan that i have to turn on when I'm driving to keep it from over heating. In the winter time it wansnt a big deal to turn it on unless I was in stop and go traffic. But anyways, the other week I was going to pick up a friend from work and didn't notice my car was all the way on hot till I reached the parking lot and then the white smoke began. I then found out that my coolant reservoir was completely empty so I refilled it. I let the car cool off and then attempted to drive home. I didn't even get a mile down the road when it started over heating again. I again attempted to let it cool off and try again when the same thing happened so I got it towed home. I had a buddy of mine come look at it who knows a tad bit about cars. He said that there is no leaking fluids coming out of the coolant reservoir and the radiator was fine. The only thing he noticed is there was oil on my engine and suggested I get the valves changed and cleaned up before I take it to a shop to see where the white smoke is coming from in the area behind the engine. Any suggestions of what it could be before I get jerked around by a mechanic? Is there any sign of oil in the coolant or coolant in the oil (which would look like mayonnaise)? Nick C Mar 11 '15 at 10:22 If the white smoke is coming from the engine compartment, then you are leaking coolant from radiator, hose or gasket. If the smoke is coming from your tailpipe, then you're leaking coolant into the engine itself (bummer). If it's coming from the tailpipe, take it to the mechanic and bend over. It's going to hurt. If it's in the engine compartment, then re-fill your RADIATOR (not merely the reservoir) when the Continue reading >>

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