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Well Pump Pressure Switch Sticking

Submersible Pumps - Submersible Pumps Troubleshooting

Submersible Pumps - Submersible Pumps Troubleshooting

Power is not supplied to the submersible pump Place a voltmeter across power lines coming into the submersible pump to check the power supply for the overload protection box. The power company should be consulted if there is no power to the box. Examine the circuit breaker and the fuses to the submersible pump to ensure that they are operating correctly. Replace blown fuses and reset the breaker if it has been tripped. Pressure switch on submersible pump is damaged With the submersible pump pressure switch in a closed position, check the voltage across the switch. If the voltage drop is at the same level as the line voltage, the switch is obviously not making contact. The contact points should be cleaned and/or the pressure switch replaced for the submersible pump. Defective pressure switch on submersible pump or pressure switch not adjusted properly Examine pressure setting switch for defects. Readjust pressure switch when necessary. Replace pressure switch on submersible pump or reduce pressure setting. Apply a soapy mixture to the whole tank surface of the submersible pump. Bubbles indicate that air is escaping. Service line should be examined for leaks. Plugged air volume control on submersible pump Replace air volume control on submersible pump Plugged snifter valve on submersible pump Replace snifter valve on submersible pump. Pressure switch on the submersible pump is defective Pressure switch points may have adhered to each other causing the switch to remain in a closed position. Clean the points on the pressure switch. If this does not work, the switch on the submersible pump needs to be replaced. Raise the pipe on the submersible pump and check for leaks. The damaged section of the drop pipe should be replaced. Restrain the output flow of the submersible pump Continue reading >>

Water Pump Pressure Switch Troubleshooting

Water Pump Pressure Switch Troubleshooting

Water Pump Pressure Switch Troubleshooting 2009-07-31Water Pump Pressure Switch Troubleshooting Every well system needs a pump to retrieve water from under the ground. To avoid the need for that pump to run whenever water is needed, the system usually includes a tank that stores pressurized water. The pump that pressurizes the water is controlled by a switch that monitors the water pressure, and when the pump starts behaving erratically, this switch may be responsible. It's mounted next to the pressure pump and connected to an electrical cable that comes from the main panel. When the pressure switch is operating correctly, the pump comes on whenever the water pressure falls below its cut-in value, and it goes off when the pressure rises to its cut-out value. The cut-in and cut-out pressures are determined by the switch, which is often preset -- a typical cut-in setting is 30 pounds per square inch, and a typical cut-out setting is 50 psi. Although the range between cut-in and cut-out values is adjustable , it's usually 20 psi -- this ensures that the pump doesn't have to cycle on too frequently and that it doesn't have to run for too long when it does come on. A loss of water pressure in the building serviced by the pump is one sign of a switch failure -- it may have simply failed to tell the pump to come on. Another symptom of a switch malfunction is failure of the pump to switch off, which could over-pressurize the system. Both symptoms can have other causes, such as a leak, an undercharged or waterlogged pressure tank or problems with the well itself. A simple procedure can help determine whether the switch is responsible. If the switch fails to turn off the pump, it may not have power. Check the breaker in the main panel and reset it if it has tripped. Put on a rub Continue reading >>

Well Pump Troubleshooting And Diy Repair

Well Pump Troubleshooting And Diy Repair

Home Plumbing Plumbing Repair Well Pump Troubleshooting and DIY Repair If you own a home with a well, you know that trouble can hit at the worst possible time, like at the start of a holiday weekend, and off-hours repairs can cost a small fortune. By the DIY experts of The Family Handyman Magazine If youre comfortable replacing electrical and plumbing components, you can save at least $150 on the service call as well as money on the parts. All the parts that can be replaced by a DIYer are located inside the house. Youll need to call a pro for outside electrical, piping, pump and check-valve failures. Most of the time youll find the parts you need at home centers. But home centers may not carry the highest-quality parts. If you want to get long-lasting parts, shop at a plumbing supplier. The most common symptoms of well trouble are no water at all, pulsing water pressure and a pump that runs constantly. If you experience any of these, theres a good chance you can solve the problem yourself. Photo 2: If the switch is bad, replace it Start by checking that the well switch located near your pressure tank hasnt been switched off. Then check the wells double-pole circuit breaker to see that it hasnt tripped. If it has, reset it. A breaker that keeps tripping likely means a problem with the well pump, and youll need to call a pro for that. (Photo 1) Youll find the pressure switch mounted on a 1/4-in. tube near the pressure tank. Its what senses when water pressure has dropped to the point where the pressure tank requires more water. The switch then powers up the well pump. If the switch is bad, it wont start the pump and you wont have water, so testing the switch is your first step. Remove the cover and bang a screwdriver handle sharply against the tube below the switch to ja Continue reading >>

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting

Home / Flotec Resources / Troubleshooting /4 Submersible Well Pump Troubleshooting Use caution when checking anything electrical. Pumps use 230 or 115 volts AC which can injure or kill.Always shut off all power to the pump before servicing or inspecting it (except as specified).Some testing of live electrical power may be required.Hire a professional electrician if you are not comfortable with this. Voltage being fed to the pump does not match its rated voltage Confirm that the voltage you have connected to the motor is what the motor is rated for. Fuse or circuit breaker in your fuse/circuit breaker box has tripped or blown Inspect wiring, pressure switch, etc. for a problem that caused fuse/breaker to blow and repair as needed.After that is fixed, reset breaker or replace fuse. Measure voltage at motor when it is trying to run.Compare to base voltage that is being fed to it.If running voltage is 5% or more below the base voltage check wiring for poor connections or wiring that is too light in gauge for the pumps horsepower and wire length. Check power at pressure switch, and then at motor, to determine which wire(s) need to be repaired. In a 3-wire pump system, there will be a control box above ground which contains a capacitor, etc.Test components and replace as needed.In a 2-wire pump system, the starting components are in the motor and cannot be repaired.Replace pump. Pressure switch not wired properly or has failed Check voltage at pressure switch. Check if voltage on pump side of switch matches voltage on supply side.Replace switch if needed. If everything else checks out OK, the motor has failed.Replace motor if available separately, entire pump ifnot. Motor hums but little or no water is moved Follow diagnostics above for Pump wont start or run Make sure you h Continue reading >>

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

How To Tell If Your Well Pump Is Bad - Mr. Rooter Plumbing

Need more information or assistance? Call the professionals at Mr. Rooter Plumbing! Chances are youll need to call in a plumber to make a thorough check, but there are a few simple checks you can do to determine if a minor problem is stopping your water supply. Some people immediately think their well pump has stopped working, but with a few different components that get your well water into your home, how do you know if your well pump is broken? The pump will certainly stop working at some point, but lets go over some of the other issues you should also focus on. There are three possibilities that could be stopping your water: Well failure (low supply of water in the ground) Equipment failure (of the well water equipment or from a power failure affecting the equipment) Plumbing breakdown (clogged or broken pipes) When you discover you dont have any water, the first thing to check is your electrical panel. See if the circuit for your well pump and pressure tank is in the on position. If not, flip it to on and see if that gets your system running. If this seemed to solve your problem, it could have been a one-time glitch and you may not have any other issues at least for a while. But if the breaker goes out again, call in a professional to diagnose the problem, as they will know how to tell if your well pump is bad. Your next check, if needed, is your pressure tank. Look at the pressure gauge and see if its showing a reading above 20 psi. Depending on the type of pressure tank, it could be indicating a higher psi, but if your tank is showing pressure, then your problem is likely within your house and not a problem with the well pump or well. No pressure? Then your problem is the well pump, well, pressure tank or switch. Call a service provider with the information youve Continue reading >>

How To Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems

How To Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems

How to Troubleshoot Residential Well Problems Written by Laurie Brenner; Updated July 19, 2017 Modern well systems have more components that can fail than their older counterparts. Submersible Well Pump Is Kicking on All the Time When your well stops pumping water, it doesn't necessarily mean you have to purchase a new well pump or dig a new well. Well pumps are designed to continue working for many years; some can last for 20 years or longer. Residential well systems include many components, any of which can cause the well to stop delivering water. Test the system for power. Before doing anything else, verify that the electrical circuit for the well pump has not tripped. Lack of power to the system is the most common residential well problem. When you live in the country or in a rural setting, power surges, power blackouts and brownouts are common in winter and summer. Increased power usage or a power surge can cause the circuit breaker to trip and shut the system off. Locate the service panel and the circuit breaker for the pump. Switch the circuit breaker off and then on again. Sometimes when a circuit breaker trips off, it might look as if it is still on when it isn't. Confirm that the pressure switch has not shut the system down. When you have a pressure tank and pressure switch attached to the water delivery system, too much draw on the system automatically trips the pressure switch to shut the system down. This is a safety measure to keep the system from continuously pumping water if a pipe breaks in the delivery system. The pressure switch sits in a gray box atop the feed line from the well pump to the pressure tank. Alongside it, you'll find a small silver bar. When it is tripped, the bar rests parallel to the ground. When operational, the trip handle sits at Continue reading >>

How Do I Fix A Well Pump That Is On Constantly?

How Do I Fix A Well Pump That Is On Constantly?

How do I fix a Well Pump that is on Constantly? pressure switch may be broken or stuck, model and type would be handy or non return is not functioning but this is less likely UNECS May 17 '12 at 2:51 The pressure gauge is essential for diagnosis, so fix that first. There is possibly a problem with your pressure switch, your pump may not be working correctly and generating enough pressure, or there could be a leak in the line somewhere. Once you fix the pressure gauge, close the valve to the rest of the house and update this post to say what's happening with the gauge. If it's getting higher than 60psi (or whatever the setpoint is if you know it) and not shutting off, your pressure switch is either jammed or just adjusted too high. gregmac May 18 '12 at 13:59 The pump burnt it self out, but we went ahead and replaced everything. C. Ross May 18 '12 at 14:09 There's trouble with the pressure tank. You are right to be concerned. Its bad for the pump to be running constantly. Is there a pressure gauge? What does it read? Is the P-Tank full of water? It could be simply needs to be charged with air compressor. When was last time? The pressure gauge is broken, I have another question for replacing it. No idea how long ago the tank was charged. C. Ross May 17 '12 at 1:35 I'd recommend borrow a compressor and try charging it. A replacement PTank is about a grand, a well pump is tenfold. Could prolly get plumber to charge it and replace the gauge for couple hundred. Trout May 17 '12 at 1:53 It does not sound like a problem with the pressure tank to me. When the pre-charge is too low, bladder broken, or the tank is water-logged, you get rapid cycling as you use the water (since there is no buffer). I am not sure if the tank is 100% full of water what will happen, as 1) I've never Continue reading >>

Well Pump Pressure Control Switch, How To Find & Adjust The Water Pump Pressure Control - Private Pump And Well System Do-it-yourself Repairs

Well Pump Pressure Control Switch, How To Find & Adjust The Water Pump Pressure Control - Private Pump And Well System Do-it-yourself Repairs

InspectAPedia tolerates no conflicts of interest. We have no relationship with advertisers, products, or services discussed at this website. Pumptrol and similar water pressure control switch repair procedures. This article describes how a water pump pressure control switch works and how to diagnose problems with the building water supply that seem to be traced to the pump control, switch, or to other underlying issues with a water pump, well, piping or other controls. We describe the diagnostic steps to take if a water pump won't turn on, won't turn off, or a switch that is burned, corroded or damaged. We discuss: How to Repair a Water Pressure Control Switch that Sticks "ON" or "OFF" or is irregular. How to Find & Adjust the Water Pump Pressure Control Switch, what the pump pressure switch looks like, where is it located on the water system? Pumptrol 20-40, 30-50, or 40-60 pressure switch operation. What are the controls, switches, valves found on water tanks and water pumps, what do they do, how are they repaired? Well pump & water tank diagnosis & repair procedures. This article series describes how to repair a water presure control switch that sticks on, off, or chatters or is otherwise not working properly, causing loss of water pressure or irregular in cycling on and off. We discuss how to diagnose problems with the water pump control and how to fix them by correcting an underlying problem, by replacing a bad pressure control switch, or by replacing switch parts such as bad contacts or diaphragm. Water Pump Pressure Control Switch Repair Procedures This article explains inspecting, cleaning, and possibly repairing a typical Water Pump Pressure Control Switch,normally found mounted on piping at the water pressure tanksuch as in this example [image] where you see Continue reading >>

Troubleshooting A Bladder Pressure Tank

Troubleshooting A Bladder Pressure Tank

A few simple steps help you check this vital system component. A bladder pressure tank contains pressurized air and water separated by a flexible membrane (bladder). These tanks are typically precharged with air at the factory. As water pressure changes, the volume of air in a bladder tank contracts and expands. Periodically, the amount of air in the tank should be measured and the tank recharged if the air is too low. Although a bladder tank for a typical home or smaller commercial water system will not have a very large storage capacity, it will perform several important functions: It maintains a desired range of water pressure in the distribution system. It minimizes pump cycling, preventing frequent starts and stops and protecting pumps from motor burnout or other water system components from damage. If it appears that a bladder tank is not operating correctly, check the tanks air charge: Drain the tank by opening the closest faucet. Check the tanks pressure by placing an air pressure gauge on the air charging valve on the top of the tank. Add air if the pressure is more than 2 psi below the pump cut-in pressure. Use caution when using an air compressor or air pump. Release air if the pressure is 2 psi above the pump cut-in pressure (lowest pressure in the operating range). Check for leaks in the air charging system by dripping a soap solution on the air charging valve. Restart the pump and run through a normal cycle to verify the setting. If tank pressure drops abnormally, the bladder inside the tank may have a tear or hole in it. You should also check a bladder tank to determine if its waterlogged. A tank is waterlogged if it is completely filled with water or has too much water to function correctly. Waterlogged bladder pressure tanks contribute to the following Continue reading >>

Viewing A Thread - Pressure Switch On Well Stuck On

Viewing A Thread - Pressure Switch On Well Stuck On

You are logged in as a guest. ( logon | register ) Subject: Pressure switch on well stuck on I think my pressure switch is bad on my well. The well keeps running even with no water use. Ive had it happen before so I I knew when i had the hydrant on this morning an talk about pressure. I hope I didnt blow a water line. I am running the well manually as needed and am going to replace it myself to see if that remedies the problem. If not I will call the well man. Anybody else ever had this happen. Posted 4/25/2010 12:44 (#1173903 - in reply to #1173879) Subject: Re: Pressure switch on well stuck on Sure, they fail regularly, and can cause a bunch of problems. Couple friends in the well drilling/service business, they change on a time basis. Doesn't take much time, and is cheap ($35) insurance. I do know of one place that has two wired in series to prevent just what you are experiencing. Posted 4/25/2010 13:17 (#1173951 - in reply to #1173879) Subject: Re: Pressure switch on well stuck on Is the switch in the well pit/house? I moved 1 of mine away from the well because of moisture causing the same problem. Placed it in the building the power came from on a water line there. Less humidity helps a lot. Posted 4/25/2010 13:32 (#1173966 - in reply to #1173951) Subject: Re: Pressure switch on well stuck on Yes its in the well pit. I can see your point. Its damp down there. Maybe should put a wooden box around it. It would absorb any moisture. Posted 4/25/2010 13:41 (#1173981 - in reply to #1173879) Subject: RE: Pressure switch on well stuck on The pipe that feeds the pressure switch is probably corroded shut or some crud has clogged the small hole that feeds the diaphragm. Did it open the relief valve? Let us know what you find. Posted 4/25/2010 14:24 (#1174034 - in reply to #1 Continue reading >>

Well Pump Pressure Switch Sticks

Well Pump Pressure Switch Sticks

Terry Love Plumbing & Remodel DIY & Professional Forum The contacts for the pressure switch for my well stick which causes us to lose water pressure I usually replace the switch once a year because of this but I just replaced the switch four weeks ago. What cause's the contacts to stick. Waterwelldude Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Well driller,pump repair. and septic installer Short cycling of the pump will cause the points to pit and/or stick. A bounty hunter like in "Raising Arizona" The contacts for the pressure switch for my well stick which causes us to lose water pressure I usually replace the switch once a year because of this but I just replaced the switch four weeks ago. What cause's the contacts to stick. That's usually a symptom of short cycling or an electrical problem. See the sticky posts at the top of this forum and check the air pressure in your tank, adjust as needed. Then check the voltage at the switch and the ohms, conductivity, shorts and amps if you can. At the link and then pg 13 for electrical checks. Continue reading >>

T. L. Stevens Well Company - Maple Plain, Mn - Troubleshooting Water Problems

T. L. Stevens Well Company - Maple Plain, Mn - Troubleshooting Water Problems

Whether you have a standard pumping system or a constant pressure system, we can help you troubleshoot it should any problems come up. Breakdowns are bound to happen, so its important that you have a reliable well water service provider in your phone to call. VERY IMPORTANT: DO TURN OFF the power to your water well system, before touching any part that has electricity running to it. DON'T TURN OFF or close the valve on the incoming water line, if there is one. This valve is located between the well and the pressure tank. When a pump runs, and the water has no place to go, the pump will burn up. Water smells like rotten eggs (sulfur smell) Well: If both hot and cold water smells, the smell is most likely coming from the well water. Your well should be chlorinated. Water heater: If only the hot water smells, its most likely coming from the anode rod in your water heater. The anode rod attracts minerals in the water so they don't collect at the bottom of your water heater and cause premature failure. Removing the anode rod will resolve the smell, but it will also void the warranty on your water heater. In-line filter: You may have an in-line filter that needs to be changed. This filter is usually located after the pressure tank, but before the water softener or iron filter. The water softener or iron filter needs to be serviced because it could have a plugged injector or screen, needs salt, isn't regenerating properly, etc. Stagnant water due to low usage, can smell. Run water full flow and continuously for about 1 hour. We recommend running it through an outside water hose, since there is no need for the water to go into your septic system. After an hour, run all the inside faucets for 5 minutes. Plastic supply lines: If smelly water is only in some faucets, look at the Continue reading >>

Signs Of A Bad Well Pump Pressure Switch

Signs Of A Bad Well Pump Pressure Switch

Whether you are a first-time homeowner, or an experienced one, its possible youve never had to deal with a well pressure switch. You might not even be aware of its existence until one early morning, on Christmas Eve or right when youve exhausted your underwear supply the switch fails. Its always the worst possible time, isnt it? While you are waiting for your Maryland emergency well pump repair tech to arrive (did you know that we have an emergency hot-line?), here is some information on what you could be dealing with and what it means. A pressure switch is a switch that signals to the well pump to start or stop pumping depending on the pressure in the water system. Pressure switches are designed to have two pressure settings: cut-in and cut-off pressure. These are the numbers you may find on the switch itself and they typically are 40-60, 30-50 or 20-40 measured in psi. The lower number is the pressure at witch the pump will kick in and start filling up your pressure tank. The higher number is the pressure at which the pump will stop. Both numbers can be adjusted as needed depending on your unique water supply needs. A pressure switch can be located either outside or in your basement, garage or pool housing, depending on how your well system is set up. If you have a submersible pump, the switch is in a different location than the pumptypically set on a pipe entering the pressure tank. If you have a jet pump, the pressure switch could be attached directly to it on the side. The mechanism of a pressure switch contains springs to set the pressure, as well as electrical wiring to signal the pump to turn off or on. Over time, the springs may loosen and the wire ports may become exposed and corroded. Something as simple as a bug stuck between electrical contacts can prevent Continue reading >>

Sticking Pressure Switch

Sticking Pressure Switch

Hi Folks: The pressure switch on my well pump "sticks" periodically. Increasingly lately I am losing water pressure. I go over and tap the switch and the pump comes on. This morning I had to tap it rather hard 2-3x in order to get the pump to come on. I have not taken the cover off yet. Do you suppose the points need cleaning or what? Thanks, Glenn F. Re: Sticking Pressure Switch in reply to Glenn FitzGerald, 02-23-2006 09:50:52 If your pump is 120 volts and one set of points is burned change the wires to the other set. Also the tube/pipe to the pressure switch can become pluged. Re: Sticking Pressure Switch in reply to Glenn FitzGerald, 02-23-2006 09:50:52 while we are on this topic here's my problem. I have problems with flucuating water pressure. I have a gauge by the pressure tank and while watching it, the gauge will read 22 psi, then run up to 50 psi then back down. The water pressure at the barn is good and strong so I believe that runs right off the well pump and not the house. what should I look for in the house for the up and down water pressure. Thannks for your thoughts. Re: Sticking Pressure Switch in reply to Sam (MO), 02-24-2006 05:10:57 Sam, can you describe your fluctuating pressure problem a little better? Do you have a pump in both the barn and the house? Is your pressure tank in the house? Re: Sticking Pressure Switch in reply to Crem, 02-24-2006 06:41:19 I have one well 1hp motor the barn(S) and are not ran through the house at all. I would have to say the barn is feed staright off the well. My problem is the pressure flucuation in the house. The line from the well comes into the house into a pressure tank with a gauge on it then to the water heater. There is a electrical box right above the gauge (pressure regulator? with contacts)that where I hea Continue reading >>

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make A Habit Of Switching Water/well Pump Pressure Switch

Stan Harrison: Make a habit of switching water/well pump pressure switch Being a new homeowner is like being a parent. More often than not, you learn as you go. When we moved to our home outside the city limits, we knew little about water wells, let alone something called a water pump pressure switch or well pump switch. The device, which connects to the plumbing, regulates the home's water supply. When the water pressure drops to a certain level, the switch senses more water is needed, and spring-loaded electrical parts make contact, turning on the well pump. When the pressure returns to a preset level and the well tank is filled, the electrical contacts separate, and the well pump turns off. Without a properly functioning water pump pressure switch, there is no water. Thirsty? Ready to boil water for pasta? The tap will be dry. Load of dirty dishes or laundry to do? They'll have to wait. Need to flush? You'll likely be able to if the toilet tank is full -- but only once. And because we have geothermal heating , which relies on a steady supply of water, our house would have no heat. So we'd be firing up the wood stove, plugging in some electric space heaters or wearing layers of warm clothing. Over time, the electrical contacts in the water pressure switch deteriorate and no longer make contact. As a result, the well pump doesn't turn on, and you're left high and dry. C. Early on a weekday morning, before anyone has had a shower. This time of year, most people are changing the batteries in their smoke detectors -- or should be. To make sure the water keeps flowing, we'll be changing the water pressure switch on our well, too. If you attempt to replace the switch, don't forget to first warn your family -- unless you get some warped sense of pleasure in hearing their an Continue reading >>

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