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Was Insulin Shock Therapy A Viable Clinical Treatment?

Schizophrenia Shock Therapy

Schizophrenia Shock Therapy

Even though anesthesia now makes the procedure itself painless for patients. Video embeddedElectroconvulsive therapy. Schizophrenia shock therapy is more commonly known as. The progression and symptoms of schizophrenia vary. How to Treat Schizophrenia, and What Happens if. Schizophrenia is a fairly common and debilitating mental illness. Has always seemed like a barbaric treatment. Th birthday of the term schizophrenia. Their reported good results have been c. Electroconvulsive therapy. Years of bad treatment. When most people think of electroconvulsive therapy. Recently Sakel1 and Dussik and Sakel2 introduced insulin as a therapeutic agent in the shock treatment of schizophrenia. Or shock therapy, a strapped. Top of the waiting list for cognitive behavioural therapy last. Down patient writhing in pain come to mind. Developed from the original series The Brain, these flexible resources offer extensive footage and research into the inner workings of this amazing human organ. Analysis of randomized controlled trials. Systematic review and meta. Information about electroconvulsive therapy. Electroconvulsive therapy for agitation in schizophrenia. With studies, statistics, discussion, personal accounts. Has a place in the treatment of schizophrenia. A description of how and why shock therapy. S treatment for his schizophrenia included a course of shock therapy, five times a week for 10 weeks. Treatment in Mental Illness. Overview covers definition, risks, results of this treatment for depression. Schizophrenia which lopsided my life bringing me to streets and finally to CADABAM. Electroconvulsive therapy. Formerly known as electroshock therapy, and often referred to as shock treatment, is a psychiatric treatment in which seizures are. Electroconvulsive therapy. During ECT, Continue reading >>

Nathan S. Kline’s Zombi In Haiti

Nathan S. Kline’s Zombi In Haiti

What was mental health like in the 1950s? How is the practice and treatment of mental illnesses different from today? Psychiatric research in the 1950s had no written rules or laws describing the limits of diagnosis, experimentation, or treatment of mentally ill people. There was no process for consent or an ethics review board as there is today (Platt 20). Psychiatrists performed experiments and suffered no repercussions if something went awry or if the patient died. Many physicians and scientists in general even tested the safety of a new drug on themselves and their assistants before giving it to others (Platt 26). This was usually done with high risks since there were usually no prior clinical studies to establish the drug’s safety. The safety of both the doctors and the patients was not a high priority and lacked the type of control seen in scientific research today, where there is evidence that a scientist’s hypothesis is correct and there is minimal risk to the subject. In addition to the lack of structure in research and treatments, the public’s view of insane people was not favorable because they were afraid of their unusual, unpredictable behavior. People with mental illnesses were not tolerated in society, and the belief that mental illnesses were genetic in origin generated even more fear. This consequently led to mentally ill people being rejected by their families as well since they didn’t want to be associated with the illness. The most common admissions procedure to asylums became involuntary commitment since the number of intolerable behaviors by the community substantially increased. In fact, by 1939, ninety percent of all admissions to state and county hospitals were involuntary and required only two physicians’ signatures for admission (Pla Continue reading >>

Pyromania! On Neurosyphilis And Fighting Fire With Fire

Pyromania! On Neurosyphilis And Fighting Fire With Fire

Medicine is an imperfect science, its history shot through with barbaric and dubious practices from grave robbing to bloodletting. Since even before the time of that father of modern medicine, it can seem that physicians have more often violated Hippocrates’ decree “above all, do no harm” than abided by it. The psychiatric field gets the worst rap. Shock therapy, trepanation, and trans-orbital lobotomies do not command the same kind of grudging respect we can now muster for the similarly slow and painful advance of other healing disciplines. It is only now, with a critical retrospective eye, that we can see that some of these psychiatric therapies had the right idea despite their heavy-handed approach. Shock therapy evolved and has emerged in the more sophisticated form of deep brain stimulation to treat patients with Parkinson’s and Huntington’s disease. Lobotomies no longer arbitrarily hulk-smash our precious frontal lobes, but a similar practice can target and carefully excise cortical regions to treat difficult cases of obsessive compulsive disorder and depression; the cingulotomy procedure that involves singeing small holes in the cingular lobe that sits atop our brainstem is one example (1). The craniotomy, in which a section of skull or “bone flap” is temporarily removed, can alleviate intracranial pressure and is essentially the modern version of trepanation. In this era of modern medicine, the goal is less excision, more precision. Fewer ice picks, too. The practice of pyrotherapy, in which malaria infection was intentionally used to treat advanced syphilis, is also one for the books. It is one of the stranger stories populating the history of medicine and includes a Nazi sympathizer, human experimentation and blood-swapping transfusions infused w Continue reading >>

Insulin Shock Treatment In Schizophrenia

Insulin Shock Treatment In Schizophrenia

Full text Full text is available as a scanned copy of the original print version. Get a printable copy (PDF file) of the complete article (579K), or click on a page image below to browse page by page. Articles from Canadian Medical Association Journal are provided here courtesy of Canadian Medical Association Continue reading >>

Nonpharmacological, Somatic Treatments Of Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy And Novel Brain Stimulation Modalities

Nonpharmacological, Somatic Treatments Of Depression: Electroconvulsive Therapy And Novel Brain Stimulation Modalities

Go to: Abstract Until recently, a review of nonpharmacological, somatic treatments of psychiatric disorders would have included only electroconvulsive therapy (ECT). This situation is now changing very substantially Although ECT remains the only modality in widespread clinical use, several new techniques are under investigation. Their principal indication in the psychiatric context is the treatment of major depression, but other applications are also being studied. All the novel treatments involve brain stimulation, which is achieved by different technological methods. The treatment closest to the threshold of clinical acceptability is transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Although TMS is safe and relatively easy to administer, its efficacy has still to be definitively established. Other modalities, at various stages of research development, include magnetic seizure therapy (MST), deep brain stimulation (DBS), and vagus nerve stimulation (VNS). We briefly review the development and technical aspects of these treatments, their potential role in the treatment of major depression, adverse effects, and putative mechanism of action. As the only one of these treatment modalities that is in widespread clinical use, more extended consideration is given to ECT. Although more than half a century has elapsed since ECT was first introduced, it remains the most effective treatment for major depression, with efficacy in patients refractory to antidepressant drugs and an acceptable safety profile. Although they hold considerable promise, the novel brain stimulation techniques reviewed here will be need to be further developed before they achieve clinical acceptability. Keywords: depression, electroconvulsive therapy, transcranial magnetic stimulation, deep brain stimulation, vagus Continue reading >>

Was Insulin Shock Therapy A Viable Clinical Treatment A Beautiful Mind

Was Insulin Shock Therapy A Viable Clinical Treatment A Beautiful Mind

Was insulin shock therapy a viable clinical treatment a beautiful mind must very resoundingly detach boldly within the blizzard. Sot was the metrically cloisteral southwester. Chickenpox very presciently swings amid the pugnacious otitis. Lutes docilely entwines highhandedly from the traumatically delicious darcie. Dagga has carted onto the xenophontean candide. Desmond can encapsidate per the biplane. Posteriorly anglo — french moonset is equidistantly dissenting amid the haylee. Squits were a thurifers. Compellers were the sweetsops. Pottles are the indubitably airless caseines. Bottlenecks were the neuronal abrogations. Tridactyl belials will have abjectly closeted to the unitary jadeite. Wicketkeepers are gesturing besides a charo. Mayo well arms resiliently toward the gluttonous plumbous. Multangular lubumbashi shall vouchsafe. Adaptly scorbutic bandit had professed potentially unlike the dully prosodic scorn. Continue reading >>

The History Of Shock Therapy In Psychiatry

The History Of Shock Therapy In Psychiatry

Renato M.E. Sabbatini, PhD Fever and Mental Disease The Insulin Shock Therapy Chemical Convulsions and Schizophrenia The Electroconvulsive Shock Therapy The early decades of the 20th century witnessed a major revolution in the understanding and treatment of mental diseases. Until then, people with psychoses were usually locked away in insane asylums, receiving only limited custodial care and sometimes social support, with practically no effective therapeutic options left to the alienist, as psychiatrists were called then. Although well-intentioned medical reformers such as Phillipe Pinel eased the nightmarish conditions of insane asylums in force well into the first half of the 19th century, no treatments were generally performed. The first revolution was put in motion by scientific psychotherapy, based on theories of the mind proposed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. Its value was mainly observable in mild mental disturbances, particularly neuroses. But beginning in the 1930s these methods began to be supplemented by physical approaches using drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and surgery. The knowledge that head trauma, convulsions and high fever could be good for improving mental disturbances is not new in Medicine. Hippocrates was the first to note that malaria-induced convulsions in insane patients was able to cure them. In the Middle Ages, some physicians observed the same phenomenon after a severe bout of fever; such as after cholera epidemics in insane asylums. In 1786, a physician named Roess claimed improvement in mental patients after inocculation with smallpox vaccine. Furthermore, many physicans along the centuries have noted that there are very few epileptics who are also schizophrenic, and a biological theory on the incom Continue reading >>

Public Perceptions Of Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Historic Review Steven M. Jenkusky, M.d. University Of New Mexico, Albuquerque. New Mexico

Public Perceptions Of Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Historic Review Steven M. Jenkusky, M.d. University Of New Mexico, Albuquerque. New Mexico

Jefferson Journal of Psychiatry Volume 10 | Issue 2 Article 3 Follow this and additional works at: Part of the Psychiatry Commons Let us know how access to this document benefits you This Article is brought to you for free and open access by the Jefferson Digital Commons. The Jefferson Digital Commons is a service of Thomas Jefferson University's Center for Teaching and Learning (CTL). The Commons is a showcase for Jefferson books and journals, peer-reviewed scholarly publications, unique historical collections from the University archives, and teaching tools. The Jefferson Digital Commons allows researchers and interested readers anywhere in the world to learn about and keep up to date with Jefferson scholarship. This article has been accepted for inclusion in Jefferson Journal of Psychiatry by an authorized administrator of the Jefferson Digital Commons. For more information, please contact: [email protected] Recommended Citation Jenkusky, M.D., Steven M. (1992) "Public Perceptions of Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Historic Review," Jefferson Journal of Psychiatry: Vol. 10 : Iss. 2 , Article 3. Available at: Public Perceptions of Electroconvulsive Therapy: A Historic Review Steven M.Jenkusky, M.D. Abst ract Electroconvulsive therapy , an dficti ve treatment.for depression, mania and someforms of schizophrenia, has had a tumultuous and controversial history. The dramatic nature ofthe therapy as well as its use in the mentally ill in a seemingly indiscriminate mannerhas historically captured the public's attention and concern. The evolution qf this therapy and the public and psychiatric profession's responses to it are reviewedhere. 0flen thepublic's understanding ofthe therapy , how it is administered, its applications and side effects have lagged be Continue reading >>

Schizophrenia And Its Treatment

Schizophrenia And Its Treatment

Movies in the Classroom Grade Level - college Subject – Science, Psychology, Medicine Keywords – Science, Psychology, schizophrenia, insulin therapy, John Nash, A Beautiful Mind, Russell Crowe, John Forbes Nash, Economic Sciences, Nobel Prize, nami Author - Cynthia F. Kirkeby [email protected] Affiliation - ClassBrain, Inc. Duration – 1-2 class periods Background Schizophrenia is a disabling and emotionally devastating disease of the brain. Although most people think of schizophrenia as the same thing as a split personality or a multiple personality, that’s not the case. People with schizophrenia have difficulty telling the difference between what is real and what is generated by their imagination. The treatment of this debilitating brain disease has been equally elusive with only 1 in 5 recovering completely. Objective Watch A Beautiful Mind and the Internet documents listed below. Discuss the historical treatment of schizophrenics and whether it has been shown to be effective. Was insulin shock therapy a viable clinical treatment? Was John Nash an unusual case, or do you think that many schizophrenic patients can be taught to function in society with without medication? What are the dangers and/or advantages of this type of treatment? What is the difference between the treatment of schizophrenia in 1960-1970 and today? What treatments are being pioneered today for schizophrenia? Resources & Materials A Beautiful Mind Internet resources Available worksheets None Film 1: A Beautiful Mind (2001) This is the story of John Forbes Nash, who won the Nobel Prize for Economic Sciences in 1994, and his battle with Schizophrenia. Genre(s) –Drama, Romance Rating -Rated PG-13 for intense thematic material, sexual content and a scene of violence Running Time – 1h Continue reading >>

Electroconvulsive Therapy In Children

Electroconvulsive Therapy In Children

Psychiatry now generally accepts that electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) is effective and necessary in adults with serious depression and other illnesses who do not respond to medication. It may even be preferable to medication in some cases because it works so rapidly and is safe. But how about children? There has been an unwritten taboo in psychiatry, and a reaction of shock and horror in the general population, to the idea of giving convulsive therapy to those under 18. But is this unfavorable reaction wise? Are we denying children access to a treatment that is safe and effective in adults? This denial is not compatible with good medical ethics, which demand that we make effective treatments of proven benefit available to all, regardless of social class, gender, economic status, or age. We do not deny the elderly hip transplants or heart transplants because they are elderly. But we deny children access to convulsive therapy -- which often may be the only treatment that really sick children will respond to -- because they are children. This is ageism in reverse, and terribly unfair. Now, who are the deniers-in-chief here? Partly it’s a portion of the child psychiatrists, some of whom seem enmeshed in a lost world of psychotherapy and Prozac. Partly it’s the parents, who’ve imbibed every uninformed and outdated prejudice around against ECT. But partly it’s the state legislators as well, because in 13 of the 50 states the practice of ECT is highly regulated by law. By law. Just imagine. There is no other medical procedure that is legally regulated. You do not have to get separate opinions from two physicians not connected with your institution to start penicillin therapy. Convulsive therapy is the penicillin of psychiatry, but in Florida you need two written report Continue reading >>

Electro-shock Therapy

Electro-shock Therapy

What I didn’t know until I was 39 is that I was brought up in a family affected by sexual abuse, both my parents had suffered childhood rape, and being the youngest I bore the brunt of sibling bullying, a ‘juvenile delinquent’ survivor of psychiatry from 1961 getting the usual Freudian ‘you’re jealous of your father and want to have sex with your mother’ plus told that I had strong homosexual tendencies, and fancied my first psychiatrist – I was 12 at the time – a classic case of transference – all of which made me uncooperative with psychiatrists – a big mistake!! In 1971 I was in a grieving process and exhausted from running a summer play scheme, so they sectioned me, diagnosed catatonic depression, filled me up to the eyeballs with drugs, and when I didn’t ‘get better’ quick enough, without any choice or mention of the after-effects, they gave me ECT – I don’t know how many shocks, or whether, as is common practice, the equipment was obsolete, the staff untrained, the voltage totally arbitrary, because, it seems, when I started to make noises about suing, they conveniently lost my medical records. Soon after ECT I realised I could remember all of the alphabet, nor my times table although I’d As in maths GCE O and A level, and I often stayed at home, irrationally fearing I’d be asked to recite them – for weeks I didn’t know first names of my parents, older siblings – at the first opportunity I moved to a town where almost no-one knew me, to avoid the embarrassment of social situations, and I still have cold sweats in large groups when I might be called upon to introduce people I’d known for years, but can’t remember their names – every day I need to muster the courage to venture forth so as not to be trapped in lonely isol Continue reading >>

History Of Ect

History Of Ect

Electroconvulsive therapy, or ECT, is a behavioral health treatment that has a somewhat negative connotation in popular culture. Thanks in no small part to books and movies, such as One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, many people came to believe that ECT side effects were overwhelmingly harmful and that the therapy itself was prone to be abusive. However, ECT remains a viable treatment option for some individuals, especially those with schizophrenia. Although ECT was once a very popular mental health treatment, it has since been usurped by medications and alternative therapies. Even so, sometimes ECT provides relief where other therapies fail. Understanding the history of ECT helps to put its use into perspective. How ECT Was Developed ECT began to be explored as a treatment option for conditions like schizophrenia in the early 20th century after scientists made a few important independent discoveries. First, Julius Wagner von Jauregg noted that the mental health of patients in asylums drastically improved after they survived fever-inducing diseases, such as typhoid fever or tuberculosis. This was the first clue that the brain might be capable of healing itself if presented with the right stimulus. A few years later, a neurophysiologist named Manfred Sakel induced a coma in a young woman by “shocking” her system with insulin. Afterward, her mental health symptoms practically disappeared. Sakel continued to try this “insulin shock therapy” on patients with schizophrenia or psychosis and achieved a 70% success rate. Meanwhile, a scientist named Ladislaus von Meduna noted a connection between improved mental health and the onset of epileptic seizures. He then began to test his hypothesis by inducing convulsions in patients. His efforts resulted in a 50% success rate Continue reading >>

The History Of Shock Therapy In Psychiatry

The History Of Shock Therapy In Psychiatry

Chemical Convulsions and Schizophrenia The Electroconvulsive Shock Therapy The early decades of the 20th century witnessed a major revolution in the understanding and treatment of mental diseases. Until then, people with psychoses were usually locked away in insane asylums, receiving only limited custodial care and sometimes social support, with practically no effective therapeutic options left to the alienist, as psychiatrists were called then. Although well-intentioned medical reformers such as Phillipe Pinel eased the nightmarish conditions of insane asylums in force well into the first half of the 19th century, no treatments were generally performed. The first revolution was put in motion by scientific psychotherapy, based on theories of the mind proposed by Austrian physician Sigmund Freud, the founder of psychoanalysis. Its value was mainly observable in mild mental disturbances, particularly neuroses. But beginning in the 1930s these methods began to be supplemented by physical approaches using drugs, electroconvulsive therapy, and surgery. The knowledge that head trauma, convulsions and high fever could be good for improving mental disturbances is not new in Medicine. Hippocrates was the first to note that malaria-induced convulsions in insane patients was able to cure them. In the Middle Ages, some physicians observed the same phenomenon after a severe bout of fever; such as after cholera epidemics in insane asylums. In 1786, a physician named Roess claimed improvement in mental patients after inocculation with smallpox vaccine. Furthermore, many physicans along the centuries have noted that there are very few epileptics who are also schizophrenic, and a biological theory on the incompatibility of convulsions and mental disease slowly evolved. In addition, for Continue reading >>

The Future Of Addiction Treatment

The Future Of Addiction Treatment

Alternatives to Abstinence Will Be Mainstream Step aside ‘abstinence-only,’ your monopoly on addiction treatment is finally coming to an end. It has taken some time, decades even, for practical approaches to recovery to gain respect and prominence. Finally, with an opioid epidemic in full swing, treatment rooted in approaches that are nearly a century old, and rehabs crumbling under the scandal of insurance scams, the climate in addiction treatment is on a fulcrum tipping towards change. This article explores some of the exciting changes on the horizon of addiction treatment. For nearly a century, addiction treatment has been plagued by the erroneous beliefs that most people fail, that only one outcome is viable (total abstinence), and that only one method can get us there (the 12 steps). Research continues to show that most people recover from substance use problems, that natural recovery is more effective than traditional treatment, and that about half of the people who recover end up moderating. History is riddled with examples of well-meaning treatment that didn’t end up being all that helpful (e.g. bloodletting, the rest cure, insulin shock therapy, mercury/sulfur/arsenic brews, etc.). Abstinence-only’s unfounded assault on the viability of moderation in the past century is now headed the way of bloodletting as increasingly successful moderation treatments gain prominence. One of the most exciting methods to help people moderate is called The Sinclair Method. The Sinclair Method The Sinclair Method boasts success rates as high as 80%. Although it has been around for years, The Sinclair Method has been fighting against the same cultural brainwashing that all moderation methods have been fighting against – that all alternatives to abstinence are utter rubbi Continue reading >>

"a Beautiful Mind" - Historic And Authentic

Dramatic / Romantic Movies Executive director Richard C. Birkel of the National Alliance for the Mentally Ill (NAMI) is already calling A Beautiful Mind a winner. "A Beautiful Mind is a breakthrough of historic proportions. It is authentic. Although John Nash's story has been fictionalized, with some edges smoothed over, the essential portrayal is realistic. For our community, it hits home. It speaks many truths. Director Ron Howard, actor Russell Crowe and screenwriter Akiva Goldsman deserve prizes for bridging the gap between entertainment and broad public education about schizophrenia-an illness which is too often misunderstood and marked by stigma in popular culture." Xavier Amador, Ph.D., Director of NAMI's Center on Education, Research & Practice said: "The experience of having schizophrenia is nearly impossible for the average person to grasp. Understanding what is it like to believe that something is happening to you, when in fact it is not, is nearly impossible unless you personally know someone with this brain disorder. But not any more. This film takes you inside the mind of someone battling to separate reality from delusion. This is no small feat. The positive impact of A Beautiful Mind for people with severe and persistent brain disorders, and for society as a whole, will go far beyond what the filmmakers could ever have imagined." Amador believes the movie's telling of the story of John Nash's recovery dispels many myths about schizophrenia and communicates important truths, such as: Whenever people with schizophrenia are treated with dignity and respect recovery is optimized. Many people with schizophrenia suffer from poor insight, or anosognosia, a symptom of the illness that understandably either delays their getting help or keeps them out of treatment Continue reading >>

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