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Type 2 Diabetes Facts

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus Definition Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in which the body is not able to correctly process glucose for cell energy due to either an insufficient amount of the hormone insulin or a physical resistance to the insulin the body does produce. Without proper treatment through medication and/or lifestyle changes, the high blood glucose (or blood sugar) levels caused by diabetes can cause long-term damage to organ systems throughout the body. Description There are three types of diabetes mellitus: type 1 (also called juvenile diabetes or insulin-dependent diabetes), type 2 (also called adult-onset diabetes), and gestational diabetes. While type 2 is the most prevalent, consisting of 90 to 95 percent of diabetes patients in the United States, type 1 diabetes is more common in children. Gestational diabetes occurs in pregnancy and resolves at birth. Every cell in the human body needs energy in order to function. The body's primary energy source is glucose, a simple sugar resulting from the digestion of foods containing carbohydrates (primarily sugars and starches). Glucose from the digested food circulates in the blood as a ready energy source for any cells that need it. However, glucose requires insulin in order to be processed for cellular energy. Insulin is a hormone or chemical produced by cells in the pancreas, an organ located behind the stomach. Insulin bonds to a receptor site on the outside of a cell. It acts like a key to open a doorway into the cell through which glucose can enter. When there is not enough insulin produced (as is the case with type 1 diabetes) or when the doorway no longer recognizes the insulin key (which happens in type 2 and gestational diabetes), glucose stays in the bloodstream rather entering the cells. The high blood Continue reading >>

8 Facts About Diabetes That Can Save Your Life

8 Facts About Diabetes That Can Save Your Life

En español l Actress S. Epatha Merkerson still remembers the moment a doctor took her aside and said he needed to talk to her. Merkerson, best known as Lt. Anita Van Buren on Law & Order, had volunteered at a health event in Washington and, with cameras rolling, had agreed to be tested for type 2 diabetes — a way to encourage people at risk to see their doctors. When the doctor pulled her aside, "I thought he wanted to get a photo with me or an autograph," Merkerson says with a laugh. "In fact, he told me that my blood sugar levels were way too high. I went to my doctor and discovered that I had type 2 diabetes." In retrospect, she admits, she shouldn't have been surprised. "My dad died of complications of diabetes. My grandmother went blind because of diabetes. I had an uncle with amputations." Like many, she'd ignored some classic warning signs — excessive thirst and frequent urination. Twelve years later, the Emmy Award-winning actress has joined forces with drugmaker Merck in an initiative called America's Diabetes Challenge, to spread the word about prevention and treatment of type 2 diabetes. "What I've learned is that this is a manageable disease," Merkerson says. It's also a preventable one. Yet type 2 diabetes continues to exact a terrible toll. Untreated, diabetes can damage the retina, causing blindness, and destroy the kidneys. Over time, abnormally high blood sugar levels can reduce circulation to the limbs, ultimately necessitating amputations. Recent research links type 2 diabetes to a higher risk of dementia. People with diabetes are also up to four times more likely to develop heart disease. Fortunately, there's plenty you can do to prevent or delay the disease. Here's what you need to know. 1. Genes determine some — but not all — of your risk Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 Diabetes Statistics And Facts

Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. Read on to learn some of the key facts and statistics about the people who have it and how to manage it. Risk factors Many risk factors for type 2 diabetes include lifestyle decisions that can be reduced or even cut out entirely with time and effort. Men are also at slightly higher risk of developing diabetes than women. This may be more associated with lifestyle factors, body weight, and where the weight is located (abdominally versus in the hip area) than with innate gender differences. Significant risk factors include: older age excess weight, particularly around the waist family history certain ethnicities physical inactivity poor diet Prevalence Type 2 diabetes is increasingly prevalent but also largely preventable. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90 to 95 percent of all diagnosed cases of diabetes in adults. The CDC also gives us the following information: In general Research suggests that 1 out of 3 adults has prediabetes. Of this group, 9 out of 10 don't know they have it. 29.1 million people in the United States have diabetes, but 8.1 million may be undiagnosed and unaware of their condition. About 1.4 million new cases of diabetes are diagnosed in United States every year. More than one in every 10 adults who are 20 years or older has diabetes. For seniors (65 years and older), that figure rises to more than one in four. Cases of diagnosed diabetes cost the United States an estimated $245 billion in 2012. This cost is expected to rise with the increasing diagnoses. In pregnancy and parentingAccording to the CDC, 4.6 to 9.2 percent of pregnancies may be affected by gestational diabetes. In up to 10 percent of them, the mother is diagnosed w Continue reading >>

Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Treatments For Type 2 Diabetes

Prescription treatment... Visit Site Some forms of Type 2 diabetes treatments are necessary for more than 30 million people in the United States alone, as diabetes is one of the most critical health concerns in the modern history. This condition also affects millions of people across the world, who are unable to properly regulate their blood sugar levels as a result of insulin resistance. This inability to properly use the insulin that the body produces in the pancreas can be very serious because the body is often unable to make enough insulin to regulate glucose. This results in high blood sugar, which can lead to blurred vision, increased thirst, and hunger, weight gain, cognitive confusion, and fatigue. Long-term effects of type 2 diabetes include diabetic retinopathy, kidney disease, and a shortened life span. As this disease affects so many people around the world, there are a wide variety of type 2 diabetes treatments and preventative measures available. They can help in lowering the risk of developing this condition, as well as managing the symptoms if you have been diagnosed. Type 2 Diabetes Treatments Some of the best type 2 diabetes treatments are the medications, insulin injections, and bariatric surgery. These are generally considered more formal and involve a doctor’s advice, while others can easily be administered or practiced at home to improve your quality of life and keep you healthy. Diabetes Medication There are quite a few options when it comes to diabetes medication, a choice many people make, particularly if they don’t require insulin injections every day. Diabetes medications called sulfonylureas can increase the amount of insulin the body produces, countering the diminishing effects of insulin resistance. It is the most popular of the type 2 Continue reading >>

Basic Facts

Basic Facts

An overview of the most important facts about diabetes. When you are diagnosed with diabetes, you want to know basic information. This section gives an overview of the most important facts about diabetes. In this section, you will learn about: What is diabetes?: The definition of diabetes and, very simply, what is happening in your body Symptoms of diabetes: Changes in your body that signal something is wrong Diagnosing diabetes: The medical tests and results that are used to define and diagnose diabetes Whether you are newly diagnosed with diabetes or have had diabetes for many years, it is useful to review this basic information. Continue reading >>

The Truth About Life Insurance With Type 2 Diabetes (8 Facts)

The Truth About Life Insurance With Type 2 Diabetes (8 Facts)

Late night talk show host, Jimmy Fallon, has a bit called, “Thank You Notes” – where he sarcastically shows appreciation for things that bother him. Type 2 Diabetes definitely deserves its own Thank You Note: Thank you, Type 2 Diabetes, for my nerve pain, irritability and blurred vision. I so appreciate all the money I get to spend on you. Above all, I really enjoy the medications you force me to take. – Sincerely, a Type 2 Diabetic Almost 10% of the U.S. population could author that Thank You Note. Sarcasm aside, we want to prevent type 2 diabetes from interfering with our lives as much we’re able to. That includes purchasing life insurance. Here’s some good news – type 2 diabetics are approved for life insurance all the time. There are some important facts (8 of them) you need to know in order to buy the best life insurance policy you qualify for at the lowest price: Type 2 Diabetes In Numbers Type 2 diabetes is a metabolic condition in which the body either doesn’t produce enough insulin, or it resists insulin. Common symptoms include: Increased thirst – excess sugar in your bloodstream causes fluid to be pulled from your tissues. Hence, you become thirsty. Frequent urination – as a result of increased fluid intake, you urinate more often. Hunger – if insulin is not present to transport sugar to your cells, your muscles and organs become depleted of energy. This causes hunger. Weight loss – your body’s inability to metabolize glucose will cause it to use alternative energy sources, stored in fat and muscle. Fatigue – if your cells do not have sugar, you will feel tired and irritable. Blurred vision – elevated blood sugar may cause the body to pull fluid from your eyes, making it difficult to focus. Type 2 diabetes diagnosis occurs when: Continue reading >>

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Ten Things You Might Not Know About Diabetes

Did you know these 10 facts about diabetes? About one third of all people with diabetes do not know they have the disease. Type 2 diabetes often does not have any symptoms. Only about five percent of all people with diabetes have type 1 diabetes. If you are at risk, type 2 diabetes can be prevented with moderate weight loss (10–15 pounds) and 30 minutes of moderate physical activity (such as brisk walking) each day. A meal plan for a person with diabetes isn’t very different than that which is recommended for people without diabetes. Diabetes is the leading cause of blindness in working-age adults. People with diabetes are twice as likely to develop heart disease than someone without diabetes. Good control of diabetes significantly reduces the risk of developing complications and prevents complications from getting worse. Bariatric surgery can reduce the symptoms of diabetes in obese people. Diabetes costs $174 billion annually, including $116 billion in direct medical expenses. Continue reading >>

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

What Is Type 2 Diabetes?

Type 2 diabetes is the presence of high blood sugar due to your body’s resistance to insulin and, in many cases, production of too little insulin. You can think of insulin as the key that opens cells and allows glucose (i.e. sugar) to enter your cells. If your body is insulin resistant, then not all of that sugar can enter your cells and it builds up in the blood causing high blood sugar. Diabetes is extremely common. In the United States, there are over 25 million people with type 2 diabetes and another 79 million people with pre-diabetes. Globally, there are over 350 million people with type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes means that someone is showing signs of insulin resistance but has not met the clinical definition of type 2 diabetes. We believe that this is an important early warning and should be taken very seriously. If you don’t change your lifestyle, pre-diabetes leads directly to type 2 diabetes. Type 2 diabetes is initially manages by weight loss, exercise and changes to diet (mostly eating fewer carbohydrates). Weight loss and exercise improve your body’s sensitivity to insulin and decrease your blood sugars. Eating fewer carbohydrates in one sitting gives your body the opportunity to process them before they have a chance to build up as glucose in your blood. If this initial treatment approach does not work, you are often prescribed blood-sugar lowering medication. We do not know the precise cause of type 2 diabetes. If you read through the forums, you will find nearly as many theories as members. However, we do know many things: Type 2 diabetes has a strong genetic component. In studies of twins, if one sibling has type 2 diabetes, the other has a 60-75% chance of developing it. Obesity is strongly correlated with type 2 diabetes, although there are many Continue reading >>

Diabetes Quick Facts

Diabetes Quick Facts

The Big Picture More than 30 million people in the United States have diabetes, and 1 in 4 of them don’t know they have it. More than 84 million US adults—over a third—have prediabetes, and 90% of them don’t know they have it. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the United States (and may be underreported). Type 2 diabetes accounts for about 90% to 95% of all diagnosed cases of diabetes; type 1 diabetes accounts for about 5%. In the last 20 years, the number of adults diagnosed with diabetes has more than tripled as the American population has aged and become more overweight or obese. Risk You’re at risk for developing prediabetes or type 2 diabetes if you: Are overweight Are age 45 or older Have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes Are physically active less than 3 times a week Have ever had gestational diabetes (diabetes while pregnant) or given birth to a baby weighing more than 9 pounds African Americans, Hispanic/Latino Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Pacific Islanders, and some Asian Americans are at higher risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. American Indians/Alaska Natives are twice as likely as whites to have diabetes. During their lifetime, half of all Hispanic men and women and non-Hispanic black women are predicted to develop diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is thought to be caused by an immune reaction (the body attacks itself by mistake). Known risk factors for type 1 diabetes include: Family history (having a parent, brother, sister with type 1 diabetes) Age (it’s more likely to develop in children, teens, and young adults) In the United States, whites are more likely to develop type 1 diabetes than African Americans and Hispanic/Latino Americans. You’re at risk for developing gestational diabetes (diabetes w Continue reading >>

10 Facts On Diabetes

10 Facts On Diabetes

The number of people with diabetes has nearly quadrupled since 1980. Prevalence is increasing worldwide, particularly in low- and middle-income countries. The causes are complex, but the rise is due in part to increases in the number of people who are overweight, including an increase in obesity, and in a widespread lack of physical activity. Diabetes of all types can lead to complications in many parts of the body and increase the risk of dying prematurely. In 2012 diabetes was the direct cause of 1.5 million deaths globally. A large proportion of diabetes and its complications can be prevented by a healthy diet, regular physical activity, maintaining a normal body weight and avoiding tobacco use. In April 2016, WHO published the Global report on diabetes, which calls for action to reduce exposure to the known risk factors for type 2 diabetes and to improve access to and quality of care for people with all forms of diabetes. Continue reading >>

Sugar & Diabetes: What Even Young, Fit People Need To Know

Sugar & Diabetes: What Even Young, Fit People Need To Know

November is Diabetes Awareness month, and although most people are aware of the disease, for many it’s still a somewhat abstract concern. Diabetes is often chalked up to genetics, deemed inevitable, or dismissed as something only old or extremely overweight people have to worry about — but this is far from the truth. Type 2 Diabetes can affect anyone, at any age, and usually it’s not the result of cruel fate, but our own choices. What you’re eating now plays a direct role in whether you could develop Type 2 Diabetes; we talked to the experts to understand just how this disease takes over and what we can do. Advertisement Which type is which? The two main types of Diabetes are Type 1 and 2. "In a nutshell, Type 1 is an autoimmune condition, while Type 2 is a lifestyle disease," says Francesca Orlando-Baldwin, CGP and Nutritional Therapy Practitioner. The difference is all about insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas that takes sugar out of the blood and stores it as glucose in the liver, muscles, and fat cells. "Type 1 Diabetes typically affects young people and only represents about 5 to 10% of the population," says Ron Rosedale, MD, author of The Rosedale Diet, and co-founder of the Colorado and Carolina Centers for Metabolic Medicine. With Type 1, the pancreas is unable to produce insulin, whereas "Type 2 is a disease of insulin excess," he says. "There is too much insulin in the body, brought on by too much sugar in the blood." Eating for illness When people eat diets high in refined carbohydrates — Butterfingers, bagels, and pretty much anything on the Buddy The Elf Diet — they are essentially filling their blood with sugar, as these foods quickly break down to sugar once inside the body. The body responds by pumping out insulin to get the sugar out Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 Diabetes Facts And Tips

Type 2 diabetes is the most common type of diabetes. About 90 to 95% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes. Being overweight (BMI greater than 25) increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes. There’s a genetic mutation involved in type 2 diabetes, although researchers haven’t been able to pinpoint the exact mutation. You must have a genetic mutation in order to develop type 2—not everyone can get it. If you have a family history, you are at higher risk. Many people are overweight when they’re diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. However, you don’t have to be overweight to develop it. Type 2 used to be called “adult-onset diabetes” because it was diagnosed mainly in older people. Today, though, more children around the world are being diagnosed with type 2, so type 2 is the more common name now. Most people with type 2 diabetes are insulin resistant, meaning that their bodies don’t use insulin properly. They make more than enough of it, but their cells are resistant to it and do not know how to use it properly. Some people with type 2 diabetes don’t produce enough insulin. Type 2 diabetes can usually be managed well with a combination of healthier meal plan choices, physical activity, and oral medications. Some people may have to take insulin in order to get better blood glucose control. Continue reading >>

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

19 Facts Most People Don't Know About Type 2 Diabetes

Although type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, there are a lot of misconceptions about what it actually does to the body and why it happens. We reached out to diabetes expert Dr. Dorothy Fink, of NYU Langone Endocrine and Diabetes Center, to dispel the most common diabetes myths. Before we talk about the myths, let's define type 2 diabetes. thinkstockphotos.com According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a chronic condition which causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to be higher than normal, also called "hyperglycemia." It's also known as adult-onset or noninsulin-dependent diabetes. "It's defined as having a hemoglobin A1C higher than 6.5 — which is a measure of how much sugar has coated your red blood cells over the last 2-3 months," says Fink. When your A1C is high, that means your body isn't processing sugar correctly and too much glucose is in your blood. T2D is usually treated with lifestyle changes, oral medications, and insulin injection, but it varies by person. 1. There are many different risk factors associated with type 2 diabetes. / Via instagram.com No one thing causes diabetes, it's a multifaceted diagnosis. According to the Mayo Clinic, these are the known risk factors (although not all of these will apply to everyone with T2D): * Weight: Being overweight or obese. * Fat distribution: If your body stores fat primarily in your abdomen. * Inactivity: Getting little or no physical activity. * Family history: Having a parent or sibling with type 2 diabetes. * Race: If you are Black, Hispanic, Native American, or Asian American. * Age: Being 45 or older. * Prediabetes: Having a high blood sugar but not high enough to be associated with diabetes, or an A1C between 5.7 and 6.4. * Gestational diabetes: Having hi Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

The Facts Diabetes is a condition in which the body cannot properly store and use fuel for energy. The body's main fuel is a form of sugar called glucose, which comes from food (after it has been broken down). Glucose enters the blood and is used by cells for energy. To use glucose, the body needs a hormone called insulin that's made by the pancreas. Insulin is important because it allows glucose to leave the blood and enter the body's cells. Diabetes develops when the body can't make any or enough insulin, and/or when it can't properly use the insulin it makes. For some people with diabetes, the body becomes resistant to insulin. In these cases, insulin is still produced, but the body does not respond to the effects of insulin as it should. This is called insulin resistance. Whether from not enough insulin or the inability to use insulin properly, the result is high levels of glucose in the blood, or hyperglycemia. There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. About 90% of people with diabetes have type 2 diabetes, which used to be called adult onset diabetes. However, more and more children are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes due to the rise in obesity. Some people do not have diabetes but also do not handle glucose as well as normal. This is called impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Up to 40% of people with IGT will eventually develop type 2 diabetes. Causes In type 2 diabetes, either the pancreas does not make enough insulin and/or the body does not use it properly. No one knows the exact cause of type 2 diabetes, but it's more likely to occur in people who: are over 40 years of age are overweight have a family history of diabetes developed gestational diabetes during a pregnancy have given birth to a baby that is more than 4 kg (9 l Continue reading >>

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