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Type 1 Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin

Boy With Type 1 Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin While On A Hes Lifestyle

Boy With Type 1 Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin While On A Hes Lifestyle

Boy with Type 1 Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin While on a HeS Lifestyle Boywith Type 1 Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin While on a HeS Lifestyle Here is what the parents of this boywith Type 1 diabetes had to say: Our son Chase just wasnt right in October of 2010. Nothing too serious but we noticed he wasnt himself. A trip to the doctor led to the emergency room where his blood sugar level was nearly 600 and his A1c was 10.7. Chase also tested positive for Islet cell antibodies, GAD antibodies and insulin antibodies. His thyroid test results were also abnormal. A variety of nurses, counselors and doctors came in assuring Chase he was going to be ok, normal, and that he could manage his disease by taking shots. Ill never forget when he turned and looked me straight in the eye and said so Im going to have to do this the rest of my life? Thats a very long time for an eleven year old. We were more than a little surprised that the doctors program did not include dietary restrictions. Keep eating the same old American diet, they said, and take shots to counteract what you are doing to yourself. We went on a mission to determine what we could do to preserve Chases insulin production and hopefully restore it. Within a few weeks of implementing dietary changes, with our doctors approval, Chase was completely off insulin no more shots, no waking up and checking his blood sugar in the middle of his night, no constant fear he may overdose on insulin. We discovered the importance of the bodys alkalinity and began to focus on developing an alkaline lifestyle. It has been almost a year since Chase was diagnosed and his A1C results are improving. His last A1c in July of 2011 was 6.3, below the standard care target range for someone with T1D. Sally and Health-e-Solutions have really Continue reading >>

Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Still Off Insulin One Year After Cell Transplant

Woman With Type 1 Diabetes Still Off Insulin One Year After Cell Transplant

Scientists report a step forward in the plan to create a truly artificial pancreas, offering new hope to people with type 1 diabetes. A 43-year-old single mother with dangerously difficult-to-control diabetes had insulin-producing islet cells transplanted into her omentum -- a fatty membrane in the belly. The cells began producing insulin faster than expected, and after one year she is doing well and doesn't need insulin injections, the University of Miami researchers said. "We're exploring a way to optimize islet cell therapy to a larger population. This study gives us hope for a different transplant approach," said the study's lead author, Dr. David Baidal. He's an assistant professor in the university's Diabetes Research Institute. Others voiced optimism as well. "This study was a good start at evaluating a novel site for transplant," said Julia Greenstein, vice president of discovery research for JDRF (formerly the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation). Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease. That means the body's immune system mistakenly damages healthy cells -- in this case, the islet cells found in the pancreas. This leaves people with type 1 diabetes without enough insulin to convert sugars from foods into energy for the body. As a result, they must take multiple daily insulin injections, or use a pump that delivers insulin via a tube inserted under the skin that must be changed every few days. Currently, islet cells from deceased donors are transplanted into the liver, but that's not an ideal option. This new research was a proof-of-concept study expected to be the first step on a path toward developing a mini-organ called the BioHub. In its final stages, the BioHub would mimic a pancreas and act as a home for transplanted islet cells, providing them with ox Continue reading >>

A Patient With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Receiving A Bioengineered “pancreas”

A Patient With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Receiving A Bioengineered “pancreas”

A year after receiving a new type of islet cell transplant to treat her severe diabetes, a patient continues to do well and no longer needs insulin injections to manage her disease. A Happy Anniversary Even the most exciting breakthrough medical treatment can be rendered obsolete by a particularly insurmountable obstacle: time. If a treatment only works temporarily, it has little chance of making a significant difference in the lives of patients, which is why the latest news from the University of Miami’s Diabetes Research Institute is so exciting. A year after transplanting insulin-producing islet cells into the omentum of a woman with a particularly unwieldy form of type 1 diabetes, the cells continue to operate as hoped. She no longer needs to receive insulin via injections or an insulin pump and is in good health. By using the omentum, a fatty membrane in the belly, as the transplant site, the researchers were able to avoid complications associated with the traditionally used site, the liver. The longterm goal of the research is to identify a suitable location for a pancreas-mimicking mini-organ called the BioHub. Based on this patient’s response, the omentum is looking like it just may be the ideal spot. A Better Life Prior to this transplant, the patient’s entire life revolved around her diabetes. “Her quality of life was severely impacted. She had to move in with her parents. And, if she traveled, she had to travel with her father,” the study’s lead author, Dr. David Baidal, told HealthDay. Unfortunately, she’s not alone in having diabetes control her life. According to the Centers for Disease Control, 9.3 percent of the United States population has diabetes, and 28.7 percent of those people have to inject insulin to manage their disease. If imprope Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetic No Longer Needs Insulin

Type 1 Diabetic No Longer Needs Insulin

In November of 2013 our family received devastating news, when our 9 year old son was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes. Needless to say, we were at a loss since no one in our family had ever been diagnosed with an autoimmune condition. Immediately following his diagnoses, my wife and I began his treatment of the daily regimen of insulin shots, which very quickly proved to be an overwhelming and daunting task. My wife and I believed that we owed it to our son, to seek any alternative treatments that might be available, in order to control his condition. Unfortunately, we quickly discovered that traditional medical practice dictated that there was only one way to treat Type 1 diabetes. In January of 2014, we began reading about the benefits of functional medicine, and how this alternative medical philosophy has helped so many people dealing with a variety of autoimmune conditions. One day, a coworker of mine who was familiar with my sons diagnoses, told me about Dr. Mark Flannery, and how his alternative medicine approach, had helped his daughter who at the time was suffering from a debilitating reaction to a vaccine. Our journey with Dr. Flannery began in February 2014, and we have never looked back. Following a comprehensive medical evaluation and blood work, Dr. Flannery was able to identify and explain in detail, many aspects of my sons overall health, things no other physician had ever done. This was clearly the beginning of a journey that has given my son the only thing he had left, hope! Dr. Flannerys professionalism and knowledge of alternative medicine principles, created a plan, a blue print, a road map to recovery for my son. There were no promises made, except for the fact that every possible treatment option tailored for my son would be explored. Shortly after Continue reading >>

Diabetes News: First Patient In Biohub Pilot Trial No Longer Requires Insulin

Diabetes News: First Patient In Biohub Pilot Trial No Longer Requires Insulin

DIABETES RESEARCH INSTITUTE'S FIRST PATIENTIN BIOHUB TRIAL NO LONGER REQUIRES INSULIN THERAPY New Transplant Technique Restores Natural Insulin Production in Type 1 Diabetes MIAMI, FL September 9,2015 The Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, announced today that the first patient in its clinical trialhas been free from insulin injections in record time following the implantation of islet cells within a biological scaffold.The patient, Wendy Peacock, 43, from San Antonio, TX, underwent the minimally invasive procedure on August 18, 2015, and is now producing her own insulin naturally for the first time since being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17. In this pilot study, DRI researchers are testing a new transplant technique for insulin-producing cells, building upon decades of progress in clinicalislet transplantation. This trial is an important first step toward the development of the DRI BioHub , a bioengineered mini-organ that mimics the native pancreas to restore natural insulin production in people with type 1 diabetes. Learn more about Wendy's journey to becoming insulin free>> The first subjectin our Phase I/II pilot BioHub trial is now completely off insulin with an excellent glucose profile. These are the best post-transplant results we've seen in an islet recipient," said Camillo Ricordi, MD , director of the DRI and the Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School. Dr. Ricordi also serves as director of the DRIs Cell Transplant Center. Thiswas the first tissue engineered islet transplant using a biodegradable scaffold implanted on the surface o Continue reading >>

1 In 3 With Type 1 Diabetes Produce Insulin: Study

1 In 3 With Type 1 Diabetes Produce Insulin: Study

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Dec. 29, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- Although it's widely accepted that people with type 1 diabetes produce no insulin, a new study suggests otherwise: Roughly one-third produce the hormone long after they are diagnosed. Residual insulin production can last for more than four decades, researchers reported recently in the journal Diabetes Care. Their findings could help avoid the misdiagnosis of type 1 diabetes as the more common type 2 diabetes and improve treatments for blood sugar control, they suggested. "Other studies have shown that some type 1 diabetes patients who have lived with the disease for many years continue to secrete insulin, and the assumption has been that these patients are exceptional," said study senior author Dr. Carla Greenbaum, director of T1D Exchange Biobank Operations Center, a repository of type 1 diabetes biological samples, in Seattle. "For the first time, we can definitively say that these patients are a true subset of the type 1 diabetes population, which has major clinical and health policy implications," she said in a journal news release. Worldwide, about 35 million people have type 1 diabetes, the researchers said. The autoimmune disease causes the destruction of insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, which means patients must take insulin injections or use an insulin pump. The researchers examined type 1 diabetes samples from more than 900 people ranging in age from 5 to 88, and found that C-peptide, a byproduct of insulin production, was present in patients of all ages. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety inf Continue reading >>

A Patient With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Receiving A Bioengineered Pancreas

A Patient With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Receiving A Bioengineered Pancreas

A Patient With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Receiving A Bioengineered Pancreas If you are reading this article, chances are you are among the 1 in every 10 people in the U.S. who has diabetes.2 That means you are just one of 30.3 million people who struggle with the daily challenges of maintaining healthy insulin levels. Nobody has to tell you about the hassles that range from constant finger pricks and insulin injections to truly frightening health crises when your condition is out of control. There is a very exciting breakthrough that has come out of work at the University of Miamis Diabetes Research Institute that promises to change the lives of people with serious diabetes. Doctors there have reported success with a new and safer way to transplant islet cells into a 43-year-old patient, Wendy Peacock, whose type 1 diabetes was so severe that she and her five-year-old son, John Paul, moved in with her parents because when her blood sugar would start dropping she could barely take care of herself and feared for John Pauls safety.3 Today Wendy no longer needs insulin injections. Pancreatic islets are tiny clusters of cells scattered throughout the pancreas.Pancreatic islets contain several types of cells, including beta cells, that produce insulin.In type 1 diabetes, the beta cells of the pancreas no longer make insulin because the bodys immune system has attacked and destroyed them.4 Islet transplantation has been used in patients with severe type 1 diabetes. The procedure has involved injecting the donor cells into the portal vein that transports blood to the liver. This may cause serious bleeding during the procedure and requires immunosuppression drugs to prevent the body from rejecting the foreign cells.5 There are several problems with the way the proc Continue reading >>

No More Insulin Shots, Thanks To A New Type Of Islet-cell Transplant

No More Insulin Shots, Thanks To A New Type Of Islet-cell Transplant

With commentary by Camillo Ricordi, M.D., director of the Diabetes Research Institute and a Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School Decades after her own pancreas stopped producing insulin, a Texas woman with tough-to-control type 1 diabetes no longer needs daily insulin shots thanks to a new transplant procedure developed at the Diabetes Research Institute (DRI) at UHealth — University of Miami Health System. The process implants insulin-making islet cells onto a layer of fat in the recipient’s abdomen, along with a sticky gel that helps hold the cells in place. Wendy Peacock, 43, from San Antonio, underwent the transplant at Jackson Memorial Hospital in mid-August. In early September, a few short weeks after receiving the cells, researchers announced that the donated cells were working like a natural pancreas – sensing Peacock’s blood sugar levels and pumping out enough blood-sugar controlling insulin, at the right times, so that she no longer needed insulin injections. “The cells starting working right away,” says Camillo Ricordi, M.D., director of the DRI and a Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School. Dr. Ricordi also serves as director of the DRI's Cell Transplant Program. “We continued giving her insulin, in smaller and smaller doses, just to avoid stressing her new cells for several weeks. We’ve never seen this level of functioning from transplanted islet cells before. It’s very exciting.” It’s also early days for the innovative procedure, which Dr. Ricordi say Continue reading >>

First Patient In Diabetes Trial No Longer Needs Insulin Therapy

First Patient In Diabetes Trial No Longer Needs Insulin Therapy

MIAMI, Sept. 10 (UPI) -- The first patient to receive therapeutic delivery of islet cells in a new diabetes study no longer needs insulin therapy to control type 1 diabetes, according to doctors at the University of Miami's Diabetes Research Institute. The patient, Wendy Peacock, 43, has been giving herself insulin injections to control diabetes since she was diagnosed with the condition at age 17. Since she had the minimally-invasive procedure on August 18, Peacock has been off insulin, because her body is producing it naturally, and she no longer has the dietary restrictions that accompany type 1 diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is caused by inadvertent destruction of insulin-producing islet cells in the pancreas by the immune system. While previous experimental treatments that involved the replacement of these cells has allowed patients to live without the need for insulin-replacement therapy for up to a decade, the goal is for better delivery of the cells to make the surgical treatment permanent -- effectively curing the condition. "The technique has been designed to minimize the inflammatory reaction that is normally observed when islets are implanted in the liver or in other sites with immediate contact to the blood," said Dr. Camillo Ricordi, director of the DRI and a professor of biomedical engineering, microbiology, and immunology at the University of Miami, in a press release. "If these results can be confirmed, this can be the beginning of a new era in islet transplantation. Our ultimate goal is to include additional technologies to prevent the need for life-long anti-rejection therapy." Infusing patients with islet cells as a treatment for diabetes is not a new idea, however researchers at UM said keeping these cells alive and functioning to moderate blood glucose Continue reading >>

She Has Been Insulin-free For 11 Years With Type 1 Diabetes | The Sacramento Bee

She Has Been Insulin-free For 11 Years With Type 1 Diabetes | The Sacramento Bee

These advances arrive as doctors report a rise in the number of people being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, which typically is diagnosed in children and young adults. The Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation estimates that about 1.5 million Americans suffer from type 1 diabetes, an autoimmune condition that can develop over days and weeks, and is not linked to a persons diet. For many patients like Edge who have lost hypoglycemia awareness over time, the islet cell transplant is a viable form of treatment, according to Dr. Rodolfo Alejandro, a professor of endocrinology, diabetes and metabolism at the University of Miamis Miller School of Medicine and director of the DRI Clinical Cell Transplant Program. So far, more than 1,500 patients have been treated with this procedure in medical centers around the world. Results of clinical trials show that about 50 percent of transplant patients remain insulin-free after five years. Even if they have to take some insulin to balance things, at least now they can sense when their glucose is low and they can avoid severe hypoglycemia, Alejandro explained. But patients must be on immunosuppressive drugs, which have side effects, he said. Still, this is an alternative for a selective group of people with type 1 diabetes. Meanwhile, other diabetes patients are benefiting from a newer procedure. In August 2015, 43-year-old Wendy Peacock, who had lived with diabetes since she was 17, underwent the first-ever BioHub transplant of donor islet cells into the omentum, the surface of the abdominal cavity. Researchers at UMs Miller School of Medicine now will evaluate whether the omentum is a better home for the islets than the liver, the traditional transplant site. Alejandro sees promise: We know that transplanting the cells into the live Continue reading >>

Rare Gene Explains Why Type 1 Man No Longer Needs Insulin

Rare Gene Explains Why Type 1 Man No Longer Needs Insulin

Rare gene explains why type 1 man no longer needs insulin A man with type 1 diabetes has been told by doctors he has a rare type of gene which explains why he no longer needs to rely upon insulin to control his condition. Dan Darkes, from Daventry in Northamptonshire, discovered he had type 1 in 2010 shortly after leaving the Army. He started using insulin, but he stopped with the daily injections earlier this year when tests showed his blood sugar levels were below average/average to low. His healthcare team were puzzled as to why his body no longer required the insulin injections and so he travelled to America where tests were carried out on him. Mr Darkes, known as Miracle Dan to his friends, returned to Northampton where his results have since been analysed. Speaking to the Chronicle and Echo newspaper, he said: My tests indicated that doctors found a rare gene in my results and that has acted as a backup immune system.This has led to insulin being reproduced in my pancreas. The gene has basically recharged my immune system and pancreas, kicking into action beta cells which have laid dormant for the time I have had type 1.The consultants havent ruled out the possibility that me staying active and running was the trauma or shock which triggered the healing process. Prior to the tests, doctors estimated the probability of Mr Darkes miraculous recovery being genuine at 80 per cent. Since the diabetes community have eagerly awaited further updates about his condition in the hope that a cure for type 1 diabetes may have been developed. Continue reading >>

Woman Living With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Bioengineered Pancreas Transplant

Woman Living With Diabetes No Longer Needs Insulin After Bioengineered Pancreas Transplant

The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community Blog The Nigeria Diabetes Online Community Leave a comment The major problem with type 1 diabetes is that the body produces antibodies that attack the bodys healthy islet cells in the pancreas which produces insulin. This limits insulin production making the body the body unable to make use of glucose gotten from diet leading to high blood sugar. The patient then has to makes rely on insulin injections or pumps to survive. Before now, several research works have being aimed at transplanting islet cells from deceased donors into the liver but this has not been ideal The liver can only take few islet cells and with risk of bleeding. Recently, researchers at the University of Miami Diabetes Research Institute have tried another location the omentum, a fatty membrane in the belly. A 43 year old single mother with a 25 year history of type 1 diabetes has been off insulin for over a year following islet cell transplant in the omentum. Before the transplant, she was said to have been on about 33 units of insulin per day. No surgical complications were observed during the procedure. The cells began producing insulin faster than expected, and after one year she is doing well and doesnt need insulin injections. Were exploring a way to optimize islet cell therapy to a larger population. This study gives us hope for a different transplant approach, Dr. David Baidal, assistant professor in the University of Miami Research Institute who led the study said. The research is the first step towards developing a mini organ called BioHub. The BioHub would be like a home to the islet cells providing it with blood supply and nutrition, making it easier to remove in cases of complications. The researchers plan to test the use of omentum as a site in 5 ne Continue reading >>

Will Diabetes Go Away?

Will Diabetes Go Away?

There is no cure for diabetes. Neither type 1 (juvenile onset or insulin-requiring) diabetes or type 2 (adult-onset) diabetes ever goes away. In type 1 diabetes, patients sometimes experience what physicians have come to call a "honeymoon period" shortly after the disease is diagnosed. During the "honeymoon period" diabetes may appear to go away for a period of a few months to a year. The patient's insulin needs are minimal and some patients may actually find they can maintain normal or near normal blood glucose taking little or no insulin. It would be a mistake to assume that the diabetes has gone away, however. Basically, type 1 diabetes occurs when about 90 percent of the body's insulin-producing cells have been destroyed. At the time that type 1 diabetes is diagnosed, most patients still are producing some insulin. If obvious symptoms of type 1 diabetes emerge when the patient has an illness, virus or cold, for example, once the illness subsides the body's insulin needs may decrease. At this point, the number of insulin-producing cells remaining may be enough — for the moment — to meet the person's insulin needs again. But the process that has destroyed 90 percent of the insulin-producing cells will ultimately destroy the remaining insulin-producing cells. And as that destruction continues, the amount of injected insulin the patient needs will increase — and ultimately the patient will be totally dependent on insulin injections. Scientists now think that it is important for people with newly diagnosed diabetes to continue taking some insulin by injection even during the honeymoon period. Why? Because they have some scientific evidence to suggest that doing so will help preserve the few remaining insulin-producing cells for a while longer. Patients diagnosed wi Continue reading >>

Gina Marchini, The Type 1 Diabetic Who No Longer Needs Insulin

Gina Marchini, The Type 1 Diabetic Who No Longer Needs Insulin

There was a time when, like many people with type 1 diabetes , Gina Marchini thought that a cure would never be developed. Endless insulin injections and constant vigilance over her blood glucose levels seemed inevitable. But now, 24 years after her diagnosis , Marchinis blood sugar levels have returned to the non-diabetic range. I thought diabetes was a life sentence, said Marchini. Now, Im insulin-free. Marchinis responsible transformation is the result of a pioneering islet cell transplant trial from City of Hope, a non-profit research centre in California. Its cutting edge stuff the results of the trial are yet to be written up but theres already evidence that it could make a difference. I thought there was no way around it without my insulin shots, but now, after checking my blood sugar levels every two hours for days on end with results in the non-diabetic range, Im starting to believe Im free. The new trial builds on similar ones conducted at City of Hope, some of which have been highly successful in their own right. A previous study found that 60 per cent of patients were able to produce enough insulin on their own to need no insulin injections for up to five years after the transplant. Even those who still needed to inject found it easier to control their blood glucose as a result of the treatment. Ginas new independent insulin production isnt perfect: she has to take immunosuppressant drugs orally every 12 hours, but in her view its a preferable alternative to insulin. The effects of immunosuppressant drugs are both positive and negative. While they do counter the damaging effects of an autoimmune disease , they also impair the ability of the immune system to do good things, like fight infection . The immune-suppression strategy used in this trial is consider Continue reading >>

First Type 1 Patient In Trial No Longer Requires Insulin Therapy

First Type 1 Patient In Trial No Longer Requires Insulin Therapy

The Diabetes Research Institute (DRI), a Center of Excellence at the University of Miami Miller School of Medicine, announced today that the first patient in its clinical trial has been free from insulin injections in record time following the implantation of islet cells within a biological scaffold. The patient, Wendy Peacock, 43, from San Antonio, TX, underwent the minimally invasive procedure on August 18, 2015, and is now producing her own insulin naturally for the first time since being diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age 17. In this pilot study, DRI researchers are testing a new transplant technique for insulin-producing cells, building upon decades of progress in clinical islet transplantation. This trial is an important first step toward the development of the DRI BioHub, a bioengineered mini-organ that mimics the native pancreas to restore natural insulin production in people with type 1 diabetes. “The first subject in our Phase I/II pilot BioHub trial is now completely off insulin with an excellent glucose profile. These are the best post-transplant results we’ve seen in an islet recipient,” said Camillo Ricordi, MD, director of the DRI and the Stacy Joy Goodman Professor of Surgery, Distinguished Professor of Medicine, Professor of Biomedical Engineering, Microbiology and Immunology at the University of Miami Miller School. Dr. Ricordi also serves as director of the DRI’s Cell Transplant Center. “This was the first tissue-engineered islet transplant using a ‘biodegradable scaffold’ implanted on the surface of the omentum. The technique has been designed to minimize the inflammatory reaction that is normally observed when islets are implanted in the liver or in other sites with immediate contact to the blood. If these results can be confirmed, Continue reading >>

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