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Traveling With An Insulin Pump

Travelling With An Insulin Pump: Your One-stop Guide

Travelling With An Insulin Pump: Your One-stop Guide

With limited experience, travelling with an insulin pump can seem like a worrying and potentially risky task, but I'm here to tell you why it's not. So you've decided you may want to make the switch to a pump, or you already have a pump and are now deciding you want to go on holiday somewhere. So maybe you have some of the following questions ... "Do you have trouble at the airports when travelling with an insulin pump?" "Do you ever just switch back to insulin pens?" "Is it annoying carrying insulin pump supplies?" The answer is...yes, no and maybe! Keep reading... When I travel I always bring an insulin pump and insulin pens with me, and if I am on a long term trip, I will bring a spare insulin pump too. This is for many reasons, one being that I need backup insulin if my pump fails me, and another being there are actually situations in which the insulin pump just won’t cooperate with. This ranges from hot springs, to water parks to scuba diving (I am sure there is more that I am yet to discover!). I hope to one day visit Iceland and embrace the lagoons there, but when in Chile, Bradley and I ventured off into our car and came across a deserted area in the location of a volcano which not only produced breathtaking scenery, but some amazing (albeit ridiculously hot) hot springs! With my particular insulin pump, I am able to take it off for up to half an hour (so when I shower), but if you are chilling in a hot spring for longer than that, you don’t want be jumping in and out to re attach your pump etc, some people will, but I prefer a simple life! It is the same with water parks, my insulin pump isn't waterproof so it is a definite no no in the water, so I always pop my pump in a locker and switch back to insulin pens for a day! Switching back to insulin pens from Continue reading >>

Tips For Traveling With An Insulin Pump

Tips For Traveling With An Insulin Pump

Traveling with an insulin pump requires careful planning and preparation, and may be complicated by new security procedures if you fly. We asked the staff in the Insulin Pump Program in the clinic at the Joslin Diabetes Center for some general tips that can help you travel safely and comfortably. 1. Talk with your diabetes medical team if needed beforehand, and carefully follow their general recommendations for traveling with diabetes. Check out our article on “Diabetes and Travel–10 Tips for a Safe Trip”: Also, the Resources for Parents and Families in the web site section provided by Joslin’s Programs for Children, Adolescents and Young Adults, has information on traveling with a child who has diabetes: 2. As always with diabetes, bring plenty of supplies, and keep them in carry-on luggage if you fly. Remember to take any extras that you might not ordinarily be using on a daily basis—for instance, if you’ll go swimming and use caps for infusion sets, take those. 3. If you’re flying, stay up-to-date on current security procedures that may affect carry-on diabetes supplies. The American Diabetes Association maintains a set of page on their web site with the current information on air travel and security. They also have a link for reporting problems. Visit The new full-body scanners and more intrusive pat-down procedures have raised an ongoing controversy about what approaches to take when going through airport security. Several of our Joslin pumpers asked Transportation Safety Administration personnel at the airport about this problem and were told that the new scanners will not harm insulin pumps. However, many pump suppliers say that their products should not go through either the full-body scanners or the normal x-ray machine for carry-on luggage. Check Continue reading >>

Best Of – Traveling With An Insulin Pump

Best Of – Traveling With An Insulin Pump

While I fully admit that I’ve come away from a couple of checkpoint experiences in the last decade a little miffed, I have to admit that I have never had anything resembling what I would consider a truly awful experience with our friends at the Transportation Security Administration. In the hundreds of checkpoint transits I’ve made since TSA came to town, I’ve never personally encountered a TSA agent that was anything less than professional – true story. Since obtaining Global Entry and entering my “Known Traveler” number in my Delta.com profile, I usually get to go to the PreCheck lane where there’s usually no requirement to enter the “scanner.” Recently, I was departing an airport without PreCheck, and I had a decision to make. As many of you know, I have Type 1 Diabetes, and my diabetes is treated with a Medtronic insulin pump. I like my pump a lot. If you’ve ever had to travel with a sack full of syringes and inject yourself 3 to 5 times a day, you’ll know what I mean. Wearing an insulin pump has improved my diabetic life immeasurably, and I try to take care of my pump which is why I really did not want to read the following on Medtronic’s website:“You need to remove your insulin pump and CGM (sensor and transmitter) while going through an airport body scanner. If you do not wish to remove your devices, you may request an alternative pat-down screening process.” A quick Google search found several articles on the subject like this one. In short, radiation may damage the pump. Now, I do not know if the opinion of Medtronic and the physicians mentioned in the article is a result of actual testing, or a lack of testing. I do know that until the manufacturer says it is OK, I will not be wearing my insulin pump through a “scanner” or submi Continue reading >>

My First Time Flying With An Insulin Pump

My First Time Flying With An Insulin Pump

Aside from the staying alive part, I knew one of the biggest challenges (?) with switching to an insulin pump would be how to negotiate my new device while traveling. Specifically, interacting with the TSA, and the horror stories I’ve heard throughout the diabetes community. Over the course of the past ten-ish days, I’m pretty sure I covered the full range of possible experiences in clearing an airport security checkpoint while wearing an insulin pump. While the t:slim is designed to go through an x-ray or scanner type devices at an airport, I still feel uneasy about that and chose to opt out of all technology-ish screenings at an airport. This means a TSA agent gets to put on clean gloves, explain that a pat down will be conducted for my safety, and the back of their hands will be used in sensitive areas. All I have to do is show my insulin pump, say I can’t go through the scanner, and wait for my turn. Easy, right? In San Francisco, it was easy. My TSA agent was both familiar and not impressed with the fact that I was wearing an insulin pump. The entire pat down took maybe five minutes. No fuss. No alarms. No problems. At Dulles Airport, the look I received from the TSA agent upon informing him I was wearing an insulin pump resembled something between panic, fear, and paranoia. This guy was terrified. He had to confirm with a coworker, three times, the procedures he needed to follow. He hesitated before every movement he made while conducting the pat down. And I’m pretty sure he was sweating. And, after my experience in Huntsville, it turns out this TSA agent gave me the full-on, “you may or may not be a terrorist so we are going to inspect your inseam and the inside of your waistline” pat down. In public. Having only been my second time going through the Continue reading >>

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Everything You Need To Know About Traveling With Diabetes

Having diabetes does not mean you should be within the confines of your home. By doing some smart planning and thorough preparation, you can go anywhere whether it is a camping excursion, a cross-country train adventure, a relaxing cruise, or a trip to various countries. Although vacations can be fun and rewarding, you have to be aware that traveling can be stressful to your body as you stray away from your daily routine and diet plan. At the same time, foreign surrounding may also put your psychological well-being into an anxious state. All these changes can contribute to a fluctuation in your blood glucose level. To help you prepare for your upcoming trip, whether by car, air or boat, we have compiled an ultimate guide of useful information to educate you better on various topics concerning traveling with diabetes: Is it Safe to Travel as a Person with Diabetes? “Is it safe to travel?” is the first question you should ask yourself and your doctor before you start to think of planning a trip. To avoid unexpected health issues that could possibly arise during your journey, you should consider going for a medical examination to ensure your diabetes is in stable condition and you are physically well to travel. It is important for you to ask your doctor whether you are fit to travel in your current condition as it can play a crucial role when purchasing your itinerary as well as your travel and health insurance. You should always request that your doctor put his professional opinion in writing so that if you need to cancel your trip as a result of sudden health emergency situation, you have the doctor’s letter as a proof of evidence and get compensation for any incurred loss from your insurance company. For more diabetes related information: Aside from the profession Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Flying With An Insulin Pump

What You Should Know About Flying With An Insulin Pump

I’ve been pumping insulin for the last 14 years, and I travel frequently. In fact, I’m on an airplane every couple of months. I always struggle with my blood glucose during air travel, and attribute the in-flight fluctuations to the stress of travel, or the crappy fast food breakfast I probably had prior to boarding (must have miscalculated those carbs), or even to sheer diabetes randomness. It was only recently, however, that I learned something critical about insulin pumps and airplanes, something that I hadn’t ever been told – not by device companies, not by my medical team, not by my online friends. When flying with an insulin pump, you should always disconnect it during takeoff and landing. This isn’t a US FAA recommendation; this isn’t about turning off your electronic devices. And this certainly isn’t because your diabetes management makes Miss Manners uncomfortable in flight. It’s physics. When I was being trained on my current pump – the Asante Snap – by Asante’s Chief Product Architect, Mr. Mark Estes, he was surprised that I had never been told to disconnect when flying with an insulin pump. He asked to me to think about how delicately my ears handle takeoff and landing. Now consider what that kind of pressure change during ascent and descent do the subtle workings of an insulin delivery device. The he asked me if I ever experienced “baggage claim lows.” Absofrigginlutely. When I’m shaking from a low as my husband picks up our rental car or I’m fumbling with glucose tablets in my cab, I’ve always just assumed I don’t manage myself as well with the changes to my routine that day. I’ve often claimed that “I’m always low the whole first day I’m traveling.” But there is more going on when I’m jet-setting than I realiz Continue reading >>

Flying With Devices: How To Make It Easier

Flying With Devices: How To Make It Easier

This piece is written by Alexandra Root, student at Boston College and an intern in the Joslin Communications department. This article was originally psoted on February 7, 2014. “It’s my insulin pump, I’m a Type 1 Diabetic”. Seventeen years after my initial diagnoses at just three years old, I hear myself uttering similar words to the ones my parents once used when I was dependent on them for getting through airport security. Now twenty and left to my own devices, I allow myself to be lead over to a sectioned off area for yet another full body pat down. Some onlookers stare at the poor, unfortunate girl who must endure the extra attention from TSA. Little do they know, the small device that set off the metal detector, and subsequently gained looks from all of airport security, is the small device that is keeping me alive. I love traveling, and since I was young I have been doing so with family and friends. However, whether it’s a quick flight to visit my grandparents in Florida or an overseas excursion, I have always struggled with this aspect of traveling. Each time I set foot in an airport, I go through a bit of a routine: I ignore the warnings from all members of the TSA and posted signs that say remove everything metal and proceed into said metal detectors without saying anything about my insulin pump. The scanner, this intuitive piece of technology, ultimately exposes what I have hidden in my left pocket. The glaring box planted over my pocket on the scan from the metal detector will reveal what I knew was coming all along. From there, I am whisked away by TSA to comply with the security procedure. For me, a girl who wants to see as much of the world as possible, this seems like an unavoidable part of travel because of my insulin pump. My stories of awkwa Continue reading >>

Traveling With An Insulin Pump

Traveling With An Insulin Pump

When I first started on insulin pump therapy last year, I was given an overload of information in the space of a day and a half. At the time, I was still trying to get my head around the strange new device that was attached to me. I took all of the information packets away with me and tucked them into my diabetes file at home. However it wasn’t until I embarked on my first flight with an insulin pump earlier this year, that I began to consider some of that information in more depth. Going Through Airport Security An insulin pump is a life sustaining medical device and I was told that under no circumstances was I to remove it or send it through the x-ray scanner. I updated the travel letter from my doctor shortly after I began pumping. I also carry a wallet card from my pump manufacturer. Expecting to set an alarm off, I informed the staff that I was wearing a pump as I approached airport security. On both occasions I was asked to remove my shoes, yet surprisingly the pump itself did not set off any alarms! My Animas Vibe is fine to pass walk through or wand. Check with your pump manufacturer if you are unsure, as you may need to opt for a pat down instead. Disconnecting During Take Off and Landing My diabetes educator told me that I might want to consider disconnecting my pump line when flying. The changes in air pressure during take off and landing could cause the pump to deliver a tiny spurt of extra insulin. This was, however, a personal preference. This issue initially harmed a child some years ago. Since pediatric insulin needs are significantly lower than adults, the extra insulin delivery likely had a far greater potency on the child than it would on an adult. I can’t say that I felt overly anxious about being harmed by my pump. However, I am a bit of a perfe Continue reading >>

Travelling With An Insulin Pump

Travelling With An Insulin Pump

Travelling with an insulin pump Your insulin pump can go where you go. With the right planning and preparation, you can enjoy travel adventures around the world. When it comes to travelling with Type 1 diabetes, it’s best to be prepared. Detailed planning and preparation are the keys to an enjoyable and relaxing holiday. Preparing to travel Schedule an office visit with your healthcare provider at least 4-6 weeks prior to departure to discuss your travel itinerary and diabetes treatment plan. Animas Canada offers a free vacation loaner pump for Animas pumpers who are in-warranty. At least two weeks in advance of your departure, fax or send in a completed Vacation Loaner Request form. Become familiar with foods of your destination and their carbohydrate amount. Develop a back-up plan for time off the pump in case of a technical emergency. Bring 2-3 times as many pump supplies that you may require, along with long-acting insulin, syringes and/or insulin pens – pump supplies and related products may not be available in other countries or may require a prescription to purchase. Review your medical insurance regarding medical coverage outside of Canada. What to pack in your travel “pumpers kit”: A back-up vacation loaner pump Infusion sets and cartridges Sensors (if you use CGM) Insulin (rapid and long-acting) Syringes or insulin pens Blood glucose monitor and test strips Any other medications you require (e.g. Gravol®) Copies of all prescriptions Extra batteries for meter/pump Extra battery cap and cartridge cap for pump Extra pump clip and/or pump case A list of current pump settings Lancing device and lancets Sharps container Ketone test strips Hypoglycemia treatment (glucose tabs, Glucagon, etc.) Skin preparation dressings or adhesive Copies of physician’s ord Continue reading >>

Traveling With Diabetes,tips On Traveling With Diabetes,children With Diabetes

Traveling With Diabetes,tips On Traveling With Diabetes,children With Diabetes

Copyright © 2001-2018 Pump Wear 1-866-470-PUMP All property and contents of web site are the property of Pump Wear Inc. All Rights Reserved. Home | About Us | Speaker Info | Videos | Product Demos | FAQs | Pumping Tips Join Our Mailing List | Order Brochures | Contact Us Diabetes Accessories Pump Wear specializes in Diabetes Insulin Pumps and diabetes accessories for kids, teens and adults. If you need a Diabetes Insulin Pump, a Pump Pak or Diabetes Pump Accessories, you are in the right place! Whether you or your child need an insulin pump, the change will necessitate a lifestyle adjustment. You can find great diabetes videos and diabetes accessories like insulin pump cases, insulin pump paks, and insulin pump clothing to make the transition less stressful. Pump Wear is here to support you and your family as you adjust to changes in health needs. When you need an insulin pump packs for a toddler there are a lot of considerations. You will need to have insulin pack friendly clothing and recourses to help you adjust. Pump Wear is a great resource for your family, our store offers insulin pump cases for teens, insulin pump accessories for adults and fashion friendly insulin pump pouches. You can choose from Insulin pump cases with photos, sports, animals and fun designs. You can even find insulin pump cases with artwork for the holidays. Whether you want an Insulin pump case that hide your pump or an insulin pump cases that shows off your pump, you can find a great selection at Pump Wear! If you wear a Medtronic insulin pump, an Animas insulin pump, a Tandem insulin pump, or an Omnipod insulin pump, you will find ways to wear your pump comfortably with diabetes pump accessories. You can make a fashion statement with your pump accessories that fits your personality. Havin Continue reading >>

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

How To Get Through Tsa With These 5 Diabetes Devices

Whether it is for business or pleasure, you have to pass through security before boarding your flight. The TSA allows for diabetes-related supplies, equipment and medication—including liquids—through the checkpoint once they have been properly screened by X-ray or hand inspection. If possible, pack all your supplies together in your carry-on bag so you have everything on hand. Before your screening begins, inform the officer conducting the screening about any supplies on you or in your carry-on. Here’s how you can fly through TSA with these 5 diabetes devices! 1. Insulin Pump/Continuous Glucose Monitor (CGM) Taking an insulin pump through airport security is quite common, but it’s always a good idea to carry the Airport Information Card when traveling. You may go through the airport metal detector with your insulin pump and CGM, as these devices are designed to withstand common electromagnetic interference. However, we do not recommend going through an airport body scanner with your pump and CGM, as Medtronic has not determined advanced imaging technology to be safe for insulin pump or CGM devices. If you do go through an airport body scanner, be sure to remove your insulin pump and CGM, but do not send your devices through the x-ray machine as an alternative. If you do not wish to remove your devices, explain to the officer that you cannot remove the insulin pump as it is under your skin with a needle, and request an alternative pat-down screening process. 2. Insulin Delivery Devices Be sure to have proof a physician prescribed your insulin and needles by providing a professional, pre-printed pharmaceutical label identifying the medication. Travel with your original insulin box and glucose meter that shows the pharmaceutical label. You will need these items in Continue reading >>

Traveling Through Airport Security With Diabetes Devices (with Or Without #openaps)

Traveling Through Airport Security With Diabetes Devices (with Or Without #openaps)

tl;dr: Put your #OpenAPS or other artificial pancreas rigs through the x-ray machine; it’s a small computer and a battery. — I travel quite a bit these days, so it’s pretty routine for me to pack up my diabetes gear and backup supplies and whisk away to the airport and the next adventure. In fact, in 2016 I think I went through airport security 44+ times, in several countries. I have never had any issues with my #OpenAPS (DIY hybrid closed loop artificial pancreas) rigs – even when I carry multiples. Here are some tips on what gear should be put where, who should be told what during the security process, and how to further simplify (as much as is possible with diabetes!) the airport security experience when traveling with diabetes. 6 little pancreases went to the airport & had no problems in security, as usual. #OpenAPS #emergencybackuppancreases pic.twitter.com/eFfYru2Ivt — Dana #hcsm #OpenAPS (@danamlewis) February 14, 2017 A list of diabetes gear you’re probably packing for your trip: BG meter Test strips Lancet(s) Pump sites Reservoirs CGM sensors CGM receiver Tape for sites/sensors Syringes as back up Anti-nausea meds Depending on the length of your trip, backup pump/transmitter/meter/receiver/etc. Snacks Extra batteries to power your phone for uploading BGs (Uploader phone if you’re still using an uploader to Nightscout) Artificial pancreas rig (i.e. #OpenAPS rig, whether that’s a Raspberry Pi or Explorer Board setup, or a Rileylink) Insulin Extra insulin Juice for lows Out of that list? Here are the only things I would pull out of your bag. Insulin/extra insulin* Juice for lows** Everything else (yes, including your CGM receiver; yes, including your pancreas rigs) can stay in your bag and go through the x-ray. *If you have a single bottle of insul Continue reading >>

Travel & Diabetes

Travel & Diabetes

People with both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes can travel all over the world – diabetes is no barrier. Make the right preparations and you should be able to minimise any potential problems. The diet for people with diabetes is the same healthy diet recommended for everyone so you should be able to choose items from the usual menu while away from home. If you are travelling alone, you may like to let the staff know when you check in as a precaution in case you become unwell during your stay. Things to check before you go Carry diabetes ID and a letter from your GP, which says you have diabetes and the medication you need to treat it if you are carrying insulin or an injectable medication. Take twice the quantity of medical supplies you would normally use for your diabetes. Find out where you can get supplies of insulin at your destination, in case of emergency. Contact your insulin manufacturer before the trip to see if your insulin is supplied in the country you are travelling to. It's also worth checking that it is sold under the same name. You can get your prescription sent to your destination by courier. Flights often cross time zones. If you treat your diabetes with medication or insulin, it’s important you check with your diabetes care team. If you need to make any changes to your regime be mindful that a hot or cold climate may affect how your insulin and blood glucose monitor work. Apply for the free European Health Insurance Card (EHIC) if you are travelling to a European Union member country – it will ensure that you have easy access to healthcare in that country. Apply for your card on theEHIC page on the NHS choices website, by calling 0845 605 0707, or fill in a pack at the Post Office. Beware of websites which offer to take care of the application for yo Continue reading >>

Lessons Learned While Traveling

Lessons Learned While Traveling

I've lived with type 1 diabetes for the past 18 years and I travel by plane for business or pleasure (or both...) almost monthly. You probably think that by now I'd have traveling with diabetes down pat. But in true diabetes fashion, I'm constantly learning and re-learning D-management tweaks all the time — especially when on the go! The Insulin Debacle This past weekend, my husband and I traveled to Phoenix for a family wedding. It was the end of March and it was my second time packing a suitcase that month. Feeling confident and prepared to travel to the Southwest, we were off! While on the plane, my insulin pump alarmed that my reservoir (the drum that holds insulin) was low, and I'd need a refill soon. I checked and had enough basal to get by for a few more hours, so I decided to wait until lunch rather than dig through my carry-on suitcase. When we arrived in Phoenix, we were starving, so we headed to a local Mexican restaurant with excellent reviews. Settled in with a full basket of chips just calling my name, now was the perfect time to fill up with insulin. But it was still in my suitcase. "Hey honey, could you run to the car and grab my insulin and a reservoir?" I asked my husband as I took out my meter to test. Minutes later, he returned, handing me the reservoir with one hand while fishing out the bottle of Humalog with the other. Or at least, that's what I thought he was doing. Next thing I know, the bottle of insulin is rolling out of my husband's hand and onto the table, and then rolling off the table and onto the tile floor of the restaurant, landing with a loud Crack! Yikes! As I picked up the bottle, I could feel the cool liquid dripping down my hand. The bottle of insulin? Destroyed. Completely totaled. No chance of survival. A gash in the bottom of Continue reading >>

Travel

Travel

Whether for work or pleasure, travel can and should be fun and having diabetes doesn’t mean you can’t travel. With good planning, your trip can be safe, fun and hassle-free whether you’re going interstate or overseas. While traveling: Make sure you eat well, consider how different foods will affect you Make sure you check your blood glucose levels regularly For people with type 1 diabetes - carry the right lollies with you (overseas brands may not be as strong) If you are flying, prepare for long delays or misplaced baggage (just in case!) If traveling overseas, time zones and extreme climates may affect you and how you manage your diabetes, talk to your doctor or diabetes educator Below is information on planning your trip, travel insurance, airport regulation, what to ask your doctor, tips on what to pack and flying. Planning your travel itinerary & bookings (Three Months Prior) Plan travel itinerary and make bookings If you wear an electronic device to monitor blood glucose levels or infuse insulin, check with the airline to see if these devices can be operated in-flight Arrange travel insurance for health and belongings Check vaccination requirements When booking your flights, you may choose to tell the airline you have diabetes. This will be passed on to the cabin crew who are trained in meeting your needs during the flight. In general, ‘diabetic’ meals served in-flight can be quite bland and no longer necessary. However you may choose to order meals that are low in saturated fat and high in fibre and carbohydrate at the time you make your bookings. Be sure to make arrangements in advance so that you comply with Australian airline security regulations specifically for people with diabetes. The regulations are: You must carry all diabetes supplies includin Continue reading >>

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