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Taking Metformin During Third Trimester

Stopping Metformin During Pregnancy.

Stopping Metformin During Pregnancy.

I have been taking Metformin for 1 1/2 years or so and now that i am 14 weeks pregnant my OB dr told me to stop taking it. Is it safe to stop taking it all together or should i do a step down? I was taking 1500 mgs a day. On the weekends or when i am not working i only take 1000 mgs a day because i do not eat on a normal schdule like i do at work. So since Friday i having been taking 1000 mgs and i went to the dr on tuesday and she said to stop. Well i was afraid to stop all together so i am taking 500 mgs a day until i run out, which will be in a couple days. What do you think? @ccwiser I wonder why they took you off and left me on. Were you onmetformin just while trying to get pregnant or before because of pcos? I was put on metformin 10 years ago for suspected pcos and even through IVF and now that I am 14 weeks pregnant I was told to continue 500 mg twice a day. I dont think it would make a difference taking it or not for the next few days :-) Take care!! @kristyingeorgia I was taking it PCOS because we were trying to get pregnant. But it was not helping by itself so we also used Clomid and i got pregnant on my last cycle of it. I am not sure why she took me of it. @ccwiser my dr left me on metformin but its because i am obese and she said that it could help me to prevent getting gestational diabetes...the pill it self makes me so sick i wish i was in your boat and could be taken off of it :) @ccwiser They left me on the metformin?!? My OB said it would be the 1st drug he would put me on if I developed Gest. Diab. so he left me on!! I'm hoping it will prevent it! @ccwiser Hi there, I am also on Metformin for potential PCOS. My RE said to stay on it until about 28wks, then wean off it. It is proven to reduce the risk of early miscarriage in PCOS pregnancies. I'm sur Continue reading >>

When To Stop Taking Metformin?

When To Stop Taking Metformin?

I have PCOS and was prescribed metformin and clomid to help me conceive. Dr.s wanted to keep me on metformin through the first trimester but I've been told by different doctors different recommendations for stopping the medication. One Dr. Said 10 weeks, another said after first trimester..etc. I've been reading online and some women stay on during entire pregnancy. Now I'm really confused! I don't want to do anything to harm the baby! I am almost 13 weeks now. Anyone else on metformin for PCOS and what did your dr. say about medication during pregnancy? I was on it the whole first trimester and I'm off it now. The dr said I could continue taking it if I wanted but it was not necessary. I think I remember him saying something about gestational diabetes and if I got it maybe having to go back in it or that continuing taking it would help lessen the chances it would develop....but not sure. My doctor stopped the metformin at 12 weeks; i was taking it for the same reason PCOS This is you third pregnancy and I took it the entire first two pregnancies and will this entire pregnancy. I still ended up with gestational diabetes towards the end of my previous pregnancies but I think it would have been worse without it. I took metformin for pcos also. Doctor took me off at 10 wks but said will monitor my blood sugar for rest of pregnancy. Will probably put me back on if my blood sugar goes out of control. Our fertility specialist is number 4 in the entire nation and he said that it is completely safe to take the entire pregnancy. Asked our ob we transferred to when we got pregnant this week because I'm 15 weeks now and he said to continue taking it. He said it may help reduce the risk of gestational diabetes. I'm not saying our dr's know everything but I am gonna trust him on th Continue reading >>

Metformin - Anyone Else Having To Take It Because Of Gd?

Metformin - Anyone Else Having To Take It Because Of Gd?

Metformin - anyone else having to take it because of GD? I have today found out that I have got to start taking Metformin for my GD. This came as a surprise as I actually went to hospital for what I thought was a scheduled sweep and to find out my induction date...and instead I walk away with neither of them and these Metformin tablets. My GD has been diet controlled up to now. And I have been told that I will deffo have the sweep next weds instead. So i'm a bit surprised that I have to take these tablets for what could be 1 week ( my blood sugars are generally in the 4's before meals, and either in the 6's or 7's 1 hr after meals?) Does anyone else take them? Do you know if they are safe with bubba? I just have to take 1 tablet a day at breakfast time. I had my GD appointment with the endocrinologist and obstetrician this afternoon and my sugars have been higher than yours but as I've literally cut out most sugar for the last couple of days they've come down and they think I can manage with diet alone. I was told I won't be going over 40 weeks though rather than being induced at 37 weeks. Sorry, that was no help to you at all was it? I took Metformin for GD when i was having Katie, your sugars are brill, im not sure why they have said you need Metformin but hey ho. They are totally safe but can sometimes give you the runs so if they do you mite not need a sweep after all I think i'm being asked to take them because my baby is very big. Already estimated at 9lb 10ozs, and im only 37 weeks!! They think she might be addicted to the sugar or something, and they said taking the tablets would help her control her sugar levels???? I really don't know. I honestly thought I was having a sweep today and getting my inducing date. If taking them stops me having a sweep too, well Continue reading >>

Original Article The Role Of Continuing Metformin Therapy During Pregnancy In The Reduction Of Gestational Diabetes And Improving Pregnancy Outcomes In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Original Article The Role Of Continuing Metformin Therapy During Pregnancy In The Reduction Of Gestational Diabetes And Improving Pregnancy Outcomes In Women With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Abstract To evaluate the value of continuing metformin therapy in women with PCOS throughout pregnancy and its role in reducing the development of gestational diabetes and improving pregnancy outcome by reducing spontaneous miscarriage rate. Fifty-seven infertile cases with polycystic ovary syndrome who became pregnant were classified into two groups: group 1 included 31 cases who conceived while taking metformin therapy with or without other ovulation inducing agents and continued metformin during pregnancy in a dose of 1000–1500 mg daily and group 2 included 26 cases who conceived without taking metformin and did not take it during pregnancy. Maternal outcome measures including; assessment of insulin resistance, incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus, the need for insulin therapy and incidence of preeclampsia. Fetal outcome measures include incidence of, spontaneous miscarriage, preterm birth, fetal growth abnormalities, suspected fetal asphyxia at birth, fetal anomalies and neonatal mortality. The incidence of gestational diabetes mellitus was significantly lower in cases who received metformin than those who did not receive metformin during pregnancy (3.2% versus 23.08%, respectively), and spontaneous miscarriage occurred in one case (3.2%) in patients who continued metformin compared to 7 cases (26.9%) in patients who did not take metformin. No significant differences between both groups in other outcome measures. Continuous metformin therapy throughout pregnancy in women with PCOS improves pregnancy outcomes by decreasing spontaneous miscarriage rates and prevention of gestational diabetes mellitus with its co morbidity and mortality. Continue reading >>

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

Metformin For Gestational Diabetes - What It Is And How It Works

In the UK it is common to use Metformin for gestational diabetes where dietary and lifestyle changes are not enough to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels. It is widely used to help lower fasting blood sugar levels as well as post meal levels. Metformin is an oral medication in tablet form. It is used in diabetics to help the body use insulin better by increasing how well the insulin works. In pregnancy it can be used in women who have diabetes before becoming pregnant (Type 2 diabetes) and in women who develop diabetes during pregnancy (gestational diabetes). Metformin is also used for other conditions too, commonly used in those that have PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome). Metformin is a slow release medication. Here are the most commonly asked Q&A on Metformin for gestational diabetes from our Facebook support group Why do I need to take Metformin? For many ladies with gestational or type 2 diabetes, if lower blood sugar levels cannot be reached through diet and exercise then medication will be required to assist. If blood sugar levels remain high, then the diabetes is not controlled and can cause major complications with the pregnancy and baby. Some consultants will prescribe Metformin on diagnosis of gestational diabetes on the basis of your GTT results. Others will let you try diet control first and when blood glucose levels rise out of target range, or close to the target range, they may prescribe Metformin as a way to help lower and control your levels. NICE guidelines regarding the timing and use of Metformin for gestational diabetes 1.2.19 Offer a trial of changes in diet and exercise to women with gestational diabetes who have a fasting plasma glucose level below 7 mmol/litre at diagnosis. [new 2015] 1.2.20 Offer metformin[4] to women with gestational dia Continue reading >>

Metformin Therapy And Diabetes In Pregnancy

Metformin Therapy And Diabetes In Pregnancy

Summary No adverse pregnancy outcomes with metformin use have been reported, except in one unmatched study. Otherwise, the studies are small and non-randomised, with the exception of one prospective, randomised controlled trial, currently under way, comparing metformin with insulin in women with gestational diabetes mellitus (the MiG trial). No long-term follow-up data for offspring of mothers receiving metformin have been published. Any woman with diabetes should be as close to euglycaemia as possible before pregnancy. In some circumstances (eg, severe insulin resistance), metformin therapy during pregnancy may be warranted. When metformin treatment is being considered, the individual risks and benefits need to be discussed with the patient so that an appropriate decision can be reached. Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pregnancy: Is This Drug Safe?

Metformin And Pregnancy: Is This Drug Safe?

Whether you're expecting your first child or expanding your family, a safe and healthy pregnancy is crucial. This is why you take precautions before and during pregnancy to keep your unborn child healthy and reduce the risk of birth defects. In every pregnancy, there’s a 3 to 5 percent risk of having a baby with a birth defect, according to the Organization of Teratology Information Specialist (OTIS). Some birth defects can’t be prevented. But you can lower your child’s risk by taking prenatal vitamins, maintaining a healthy weight, and maintaining a healthy lifestyle. Your doctor might recommend that you don’t take certain medications while pregnant. This is because certain medications can cause birth defects. If you're taking the prescription drug metformin, you might have concerns about how the drug will affect your pregnancy and the health of your unborn child. What Is Metformin? Metformin is an oral medication used to treat type 2 diabetes and polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Type 2 diabetes is a condition that increases blood sugar levels. PCOS is an endocrine disorder that occurs in women of reproductive age. It’s important to maintain a healthy blood sugar level while pregnant. This is one way to reduce the risk of birth defects and complications. Although metformin can control blood sugar, you may question whether this drug is safe to take during pregnancy. Before we get into this, let’s discuss how metformin is beneficial prior to pregnancy. Metformin Before Conception If you took metformin before getting pregnant, you might know that this drug can be a godsend — especially if you’ve had difficulty conceiving. Having PCOS makes it harder to become pregnant. This condition can cause missed or irregular periods, and small cysts can grow on your Continue reading >>

Effects Of Metformin Use In Pregnant Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Effects Of Metformin Use In Pregnant Patients With Polycystic Ovary Syndrome

Go to: REVIEW OF LITERATURE In a randomized, placebo-controlled, double blind study, done on 257 pregnant women with PCOS, aged 18 - 42 years, who either received metformin or placebo from first trimester to delivery, failed to demonstrate any reduction of pregnancy-related complications, such as gestational diabetes, pre-eclampsia and pre-term delivery in the metformin group.[7] On the contrary, a prospective study done on 98 pregnant women with PCOS who received metformin (1700 – 3000 mg/day) before conception and up to 37 weeks of pregnancy vs. 110 normal pregnant controls, showed a significant reduction of pregnancy complications, such as gestational diabetes and gestational hypertension but an insignificant decrease in pre-eclampsia incidence with comparable mean neonatal Apgar scores, weight and length between the 2 groups.[8] Metformin has been shown to have encouraging effects on several metabolic aspects of polycystic ovarian syndrome, such as insulin sensitivity, plasma glucose concentration, and lipid profile and since women with PCOS are more likely than healthy women to suffer from pregnancy-related problems like early pregnancy loss, gestational diabetes mellitus and hypertensive states in pregnancy, the use of metformin therapy in these patients throughout pregnancy may have beneficial effects on early pregnancy loss and development of gestational diabetes. However, there is little evidence of its beneficial effect on hypertensive complications in pregnancy.[9] In a 3-year case controlled study, conducted on 197 pregnant women with PCOS (confirmed by Rotterdam criteria), in which cases comprised of women who continued metformin throughout pregnancy while controls were women who stopped metformin after the first trimester, it was concluded that in compar Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pregnancy - General Practice Notebook

Metformin And Pregnancy - General Practice Notebook

There is evidence relating to maternal and neonatal complications in pregnancies of diabetic women treated with oral hypoglycaemic agents (1): a cohort study including all consecutively registered, orally treated pregnant diabetic patients set in a diabetic obstetrical service at a university hospital 50 women treated with metformin, 68 women treated with sulphonylurea during pregnancy and a reference group of 42 diabetic women treated with insulin during pregnancy the prevalence of pre-eclampsia was significantly increased in the group of women treated with metformin compared to women treated with sulphonylurea or insulin (32 vs. 7 vs. 10%, P < 0.001) no difference in neonatal morbidity was observed between the orally treated and insulin-treated group; no cases of severe hypoglycaemia or jaundice were seen in the orally treated groups. However, in the group of women treated with metformin in the third trimester, the perinatal mortality was significantly increased compared to women not treated with metformin (11.6 vs. 1.3%, P < 0.02) the authors concluded that treatment with metformin during pregnancy was associated with increased prevalence of pre-eclampsia and a high perinatal mortality however a more recent systematic review concluded that there was no substantial maternal or neonatal outcome differences found with the use of glyburide or metformin compared with use of insulin in women with gestational diabetes (2) with respect to the use of metformin and glibenclamide in pregnancy: although metformin is commonly used in UK clinical practice in the management of diabetes in pregnancy and lactation, and there is strong evidence for its effectiveness and safety (presented in the full version of the guideline), at the time of publication (February 2015) metformin did n Continue reading >>

Metformin Reduces Pregnancy Complications Without Affecting Androgen Levels In Pregnant Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Women: Results Of A Randomized Study

Metformin Reduces Pregnancy Complications Without Affecting Androgen Levels In Pregnant Polycystic Ovary Syndrome Women: Results Of A Randomized Study

Metformin reduces pregnancy complications without affecting androgen levels in pregnant polycystic ovary syndrome women: results of a randomized study To whom correspondence should be addressed at: Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, St Olavs Hospital, University Hospital of Trondheim, Olav Kyrres g. 17, N-7006 Trondheim, Norway. Email: [email protected] Search for other works by this author on: Human Reproduction, Volume 19, Issue 8, 1 August 2004, Pages 17341740, E. Vanky, K.. Salvesen, R. Heimstad, K.J. Fougner, P. Romundstad, S.M. Carlsen; Metformin reduces pregnancy complications without affecting androgen levels in pregnant polycystic ovary syndrome women: results of a randomized study, Human Reproduction, Volume 19, Issue 8, 1 August 2004, Pages 17341740, BACKGROUND: Investigation of a possible effect of metformin on androgen levels in pregnant women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). METHODS: A prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pilot study was conducted. Forty pregnant women with PCOS received diet and lifestyle counselling and were randomized to either metformin 850 mg twice daily or placebo. Primary outcome measures were changes in serum levels of dehydroepiandrosterone sulphate, androstenedione, testosterone, sex hormone-binding globulin, and free testosterone index. Secondary outcome measures were pregnancy complications and outcome. Two-tailed t -tests and 2 -tests were used. RESULTS: Maternal androgen levels were unaffected by metformin treatment in pregnant women with PCOS. While none of the 18 women in the metformin group experienced a severe pregnancy or post-partum complication, seven of the 22 (32%) women experienced severe complications in the placebo group ( P =0.01). CONCLUSIONS: Metformin treatment did Continue reading >>

Metformin And Pregnancy

Metformin And Pregnancy

In every pregnancy, a woman starts out with a 3-5% chance of having a baby with a birth defect. This is called her background risk. This sheet talks about whether exposure to metformin may increase the risk for birth defects over that background risk. This information should not take the place of medical care and advice from your health care provider. What is metformin? Metformin is an oral medication used to treat type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance in polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Other names for this medication include Glucophage®, Diformin®, Glumetza®, FORTAMET® and Glycon®. I use metformin for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. Should I stop metformin before I get pregnant? Before and during pregnancy, blood sugar levels should be under control to prevent a higher chance of birth defects and complications. Insulin is usually the medication of choice because it controls blood sugar more tightly than oral medications. However, metformin has also been used to treat type 2 diabetes in pregnant women when insulin alone provides only partial blood sugar control. Please consult your health care before pregnancy to determine which medication(s) is/are the most appropriate for you. For more information about diabetes during pregnancy, please see the MotherToBaby fact sheet Diabetes and Pregnancy at If you become pregnant while using metformin, you should not stop your medication without first talking to your health care provider. I am taking metformin to treat PCOS. Should I stop taking the medication before and/or after I get pregnant? You should not stop any medication without first talking with your health care provider. Studies have indicated that women with PCOS who are treated with metformin have a better chance of getting pregnant. Some studies Continue reading >>

Metformin During Pregnancy

Metformin During Pregnancy

Pregnancy Outcomes among PCOS women with Metformin Around Sept. 23/24, 2002, a discussion was held on obgyn-l (for professionals only) at OBGYN.NET . Note that only professionals can post on the list, however the archivesare searchable. Please review the following posts using the Gyn:PCO subject line . On March 19, 2002, I got some information from Robert W. Rossi, R.Ph., C.D.E., aClinical Pharmacist Consultant, in regards to glyburideduring pregnancy as an alternative to Metformin. There is some question as to whetheror not this is safer than Metformin. Apparently the newer version of these types ofdrugs do not cross the placenta barrier. Dr. Langer is doing research on this. Those resources will be listed at the end of this page.11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17. As of April 8, 2002, I believe I have the paper Maria Iuorno's paper in here (a Dr. Nestler colleague at MCV in Richmond, Va.), presented at the Endocrine Society.It was posted on one of the forums, and I'm trying to look up the person who sent it.Its in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism, Effects of Metformin on Early Pregnancy Loss in the Polycystic Ovary Syndrome, Daniela J. Jakubowicz, Maria J. Iuorno, Salomon Jakubowicz, Katherine A. Roberts and John E. Nestler. Hospital de Clinicas Caracas and Central University of Venezuela(D.J.J., S.J.), Caracas 1040, Venezuela; and Departments of Medicine(M.J.I., K.A.R., J.E.N.) and Obstetrics and Gynecology (J.E.N.), MedicalCollege of Virginia, Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond,Virginia 23298-0111. A retrospective study of all PCOS women seen in an academicendocrinology clinic within the past 4.5 yr and who became pregnant during that timewere studied. 65 women got Metformin and 31 did not. The early pregnancy loss rate withMetformin was 8.8% (6 o Continue reading >>

Comparison Of Metformin And Insulin In The Treatment Of Gestational Diabetes: A Retrospective, Case-control Study

Comparison Of Metformin And Insulin In The Treatment Of Gestational Diabetes: A Retrospective, Case-control Study

Go to: Introduction Pregnancy is a potentially glucose intolerant condition, and in all pregnancies, insulin sensitivity decreases as the pregnancy advances. This predisposes to the development of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM), particularly in obese women with pre-existing insulin resistance. GDM develops if there is inadequate insulin secretion to compensate for the increased insulin resistance [1]. GDM is diagnosed in approximately 3-7% of pregnancies [2, 3, 4]. The incidence of GDM increases in older and more obese pregnant women. GDM increases the risk of certain pregnancy complications like pregnancy-induced hypertension and adverse perinatal outcome, and carries the risk of later development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). [1, 2, 4, 5]. Prospective randomized studies have recently demonstrated that effective treatment of hyperglycemia in women with GDM can reduce adverse perinatal outcomes [6]. The main purpose of treatment is to prevent fetal hyperinsulinemia and fetal macrosomia by reducing maternal glucose levels [7]. This is initially attempted by dietary and exercise counseling, but women often require additional treatment, which has traditionally been insulin [2]. The percentage of GDM patients needing pharmacological treatment varies from 20% to 60% in various studies [8]. However, the disadvantages of insulin for pregnant women, like other patients needing insulin, include the need to give injections, risk of hypoglycemia and risk of excessive weight gain [8, 9]. Theoretically, metformin is an alternative to insulin in the treatment of hyperglycemia during pregnancy. It decreases hepatic gluconeogenesis and improves peripheral glucose uptake [10]. It does not induce hypoglycemia and it is not associated with increased weight gain. Evidence suppor Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Metformin

Gestational Diabetes Metformin

I'm 30 weeks pregnant with gestational diabetes. I've been unable to sort out my blood sugar level through diet so have been put on metformin 3 times a day. Has anyone else used metformin in 3rd trimester? I'm a bit worried about it!!! "FDA pregnancy category B. This medication is not expected to be harmful to an unborn baby. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant or plan to become pregnant during treatment. It is not known whether metformin passes into breast milk or if it could harm a nursing baby. Do not take metformin without first talking to your doctor if you are breast-feeding a baby. Metformin should not be given to a child younger than 10 years old. Extended-release metformin (Glucophage XR) should not be given to a child younger than 17 years old." I'm currently taking a drug thats a pregnancy category C, but the baby is fine... As you have gestational diabetes, it is much better for you and your baby to take this medicine rather than risk the consequences of not taking it... Your doctor would not have prescribed it if it posed a great risk to the unborn baby... Continue reading >>

Metformin In Gestational Diabetes: An Emerging Contender

Metformin In Gestational Diabetes: An Emerging Contender

1 Consultant Endocrinologist, Department of Endocrinology, G. D Hospital and Diabetes Institute, Kolkata, West Bengal ; Chief Endocrinologist, Department of Endocrinology, Sun Valley Diabetes Hospital, Guwahati, Assam, India 2 Consultant Gynecologist, Department of Gynecology, G. D Hospital and Diabetes Institute, Kolkata, West Bengal, India Correspondence Address: Awadhesh Kumar Singh Flat 1C, 3 Canal Street, Kolkata, West Bengal - 700 014 India Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None DOI: 10.4103/2230-8210.149317 Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is defined as any degree of glucose intolerance occurring first time during pregnancy. Its prevalence is simultaneously increasing with the global rise of diabesity. GDM commonly develops, when maternal glucose metabolism is unable to compensate for the progressive development of insulin resistance, arising primarily from the consistently rising diabetogenic placental hormones. It classically develops during the second or third trimester. Theoretically, insulin sensitizers should have been the ideal agent in its treatment, given the insulin resistance, the major culprit in its pathogenesis. Fortunately, majority of women can be treated satisfactorily with lifestyle modification, and approximately 20% requires more intensive treatment. For several decades, insulin has been the most reliable treatment strategy and the gold standard in GDM. Metformin is effective insulin sensitizing agent and an established first line drug in type 2 diabetes currently. As it crosses the placenta, a safety issue remains an obstacle and, therefore, metformin is currently not recommended in the treatment of GDM. Nevertheless, given the emerging clinically equivalent safety and efficacy data of metformin compared to insulin, it appears Continue reading >>

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