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Synthetic Insulin Side Effects

[the Biological Effect Of Purely Synthetic Human Insulin In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus].

[the Biological Effect Of Purely Synthetic Human Insulin In Patients With Diabetes Mellitus].

Schweiz Med Wochenschr. 1979 May 19;109(20):743-7. [The biological effect of purely synthetic human insulin in patients with diabetes mellitus]. Six patients with diabetes were treated with fully synthetic human insulin (CGP 12 831) for durations of 3 days (4 patients), 4 days and 13 days (1 patient each). In every case, clinical signs of hypoglycemia were registered and measured by blood sugar determinations. Two patients with insulin-dependent diabetes were maintained on synthetic insulin. Ketoacidosis was corrected in 1 patient. In a hyperglycemic diabetic with failing response to oral antidiabetics, synthetic insulin normalized the hyperglycemia. In 2 juveniles with recent onset of diabetes, every injection of synthetic insulin was followed by a fall in blood sugar. In a normal individual, hypoglycemia developed after a single injection of 8 units. The synthetic human insulin was well tolerated. The 6 diabetics showed evidence of full biological action of the fully synthetic insulin, as was expected from animal experiments. Continue reading >>

Insulin: It’s A Good Thing. Really!

Insulin: It’s A Good Thing. Really!

One of my nurse educator colleagues was recently featured in a teaching video on how to inject insulin. As part of the video, we asked people who have diabetes and who take insulin to answer some questions about what it’s like to have diabetes, including following a meal plan and injecting insulin. While a few of the people (two of them were young women) boldly stated that they disliked having to take insulin (or as one woman put, “poke herself”), all of them agreed that insulin was a good thing and that, if you need it, take it. As a dietitian, I’ve dealt mostly with the “food” end of diabetes, but of course, food and insulin are so closely intertwined that you really can’t talk about one without the other (and vice versa). More and more people have diabetes, as you’re aware, and more and more people are taking insulin. Now, you know that if you have Type 1 diabetes, you have to take insulin in order to live. Right now, there are no other options for treating Type 1. With Type 2 diabetes, things are a little murkier. Some people with Type 2 can manage just fine, at least for a while, by following a meal plan, controlling their weight, and getting regular exercise. Most people, though, are started off on a medicine (usually metformin), along with a meal plan and physical activity. After a few years, one or two more medicines (usually pills) are added. And then, after that, typically comes insulin. It’s at this stage where people beg, plead, cry, or yell to do anything to stay off of the dreaded “needle.” Why is this? Well, an obvious reason is that most of us don’t like needles. They can hurt. They’re sharp. They look long. But there are other reasons for not wanting to go on insulin, besides having to “take a needle.” I’ve listed some of Continue reading >>

True Story Of Gm Insulin For Diabetics

True Story Of Gm Insulin For Diabetics

previous | next | ecoNews2000 list | ecoglobe front page | site index & keywords True story of GM insulin for diabetics [ecoglobe is not sure who wrote the introduction to the below articles. But we think the material is worth reading and we thank the people mentioned at the bottom who posted it.] It is vital that the word is spread about the true effects of this stuff (including sudden and unexpected deaths) on many diabetics. It is vital too that pro-GM scientists in America are NOT allowed to get away with making out that GM insulin has been this great GM success story. It is far from being so. I don't recall a single instance where a diabetic has felt better on the GM insulin than the animal; I'd be glad to hear from any. Those who want to know more can go to Diabetics World Website at for the full disastrous story from diabetics' own mouths. See also for reports from Swiss diabetics on the same issue. Note that the Diabetics World site states that although the companies pushing GM insulin are telling worried doctors and patients that the traditional animal insulin will still be available for those who have problems with the GM "human" sort, some diabetics are already finding it impossible to source the animal insulin as the companies have withdrawn it from sale. Similar story with the farmers unable to source non-GM seed. So much for consumer choice. The diabetics site also suggests, interestingly, that the companies who make this GM insulin are now spreading rumors about the possible risk of transmission of BSE from cow-derived insulin, in order to propel doctors and patients into favoring the GM insulin. While this may be a valid point (though no evidence currently exists to support it), it hardly helps those whose bodies simply react badly to the GM insulin yet Continue reading >>

Insulin (medication)

Insulin (medication)

"Insulin therapy" redirects here. For the psychiatric treatment, see Insulin shock therapy. Insulin is used as a medication to treat high blood sugar.[3] This includes in diabetes mellitus type 1, diabetes mellitus type 2, gestational diabetes, and complications of diabetes such as diabetic ketoacidosis and hyperosmolar hyperglycemic states.[3] It is also used along with glucose to treat high blood potassium levels.[4] Typically it is given by injection under the skin, but some forms may also be used by injection into a vein or muscle.[3] The common side effect is low blood sugar.[3] Other side effects may include pain or skin changes at the sites of injection, low blood potassium, and allergic reactions.[3] Use during pregnancy is relatively safe for the baby.[3] Insulin can be made from the pancreas of pigs or cows.[5] Human versions can be made either by modifying pig versions or recombinant technology.[5] It comes in three main types short–acting (such as regular insulin), intermediate–acting (such as NPH insulin), and longer-acting (such as insulin glargine).[5] Insulin was first used as a medication in Canada by Charles Best and Frederick Banting in 1922.[6] It is on the World Health Organization's List of Essential Medicines, the most effective and safe medicines needed in a health system.[7] The wholesale cost in the developing world is about US$2.39 to $10.61 per 1,000 iu of regular insulin and $2.23 to $10.35 per 1,000 iu of NPH insulin.[8][9] In the United Kingdom 1,000 iu of regular or NPH insulin costs the NHS 7.48 pounds, while this amount of insulin glargine costs 30.68 pounds.[5] Medical uses[edit] Giving insulin with an insulin pen. Insulin is used to treat a number of diseases including diabetes and its acute complications such as diabetic ketoacid Continue reading >>

Diabetics Not Told Of Insulin Risk

Diabetics Not Told Of Insulin Risk

Evidence that thousands of diabetics in Britain may have suffered a deterioration in their health from synthetic insulin has been withheld by the British Diabetics Association, whose role is to advise patients and to protect their interests. The evidence was contained in a report, commissioned by the association and completed six years ago, which highlighted dangers faced by about 10 per cent of the 150,000 diabetics who had been switched from the traditional animal-derived insulin to synthetic human insulin. Some of those adversely affected began, without warning, to go into comas, known as hypoglycaemic episodes or 'hypos'. Some suffered severe injuries, a few crashed their cars, and others believed they would have died had they not been rescued as they lay unconscious. An estimated 15,000 people may still suffer because they are injecting themselves twice a day with insulin that may not suit them. Many doctors are unaware of the problem, or have failed to put their patients back on animal insulin because they do not know it is still available. The association says it did not publish the report because it was 'too alarmist'. Simon O'Neill, head of diabetes care services, said the association agreed that up to 20 per cent of insulin injectors preferred animal insulin and had experienced difficulties with synthetic insulin. He added that the association had published a report, The Insulin Debate, which dealt with the issues, continued to keep members informed of developments, and campaigned to keep animal insulin available to sufferers. Synthetic insulin is manufactured by two major drug companies, the Danish Novo Nordisk and US giant Elli Lilly. Neither company accepts that the synthetic version has negative effects. The report was compiled following 3,000 letters of c Continue reading >>

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus Side Effects Center

Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection is a man-made form of a hormone that is produced in the body used to treat type 1 (insulin-dependent) or type 2 (non insulin-dependent) diabetes. The most common side effects of Lantus is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. Symptoms include: hunger, sweating, irritability, trouble concentrating, rapid breathing, fast heartbeat, seizure (severe hypoglycemia can be fatal). Other common side effects of Lantus include pain, redness, swelling, itching, or thickening of the skin at the injection site. These side effects usually go away after a few days or weeks. Lantus should be administered subcutaneously (under the skin) once a day at the same time every day. Dose is determined by the individual and the desired blood glucose levels. Lantus may interact with albuterol, clonidine, reserpine, or beta-blockers. Many other medicines can increase or decrease the effects of insulin glargine on lowering your blood sugar. Tell your doctor all prescription and over-the-counter medications and supplements you use. Tell your doctor if you are pregnant before using Lantus. Discuss a plan to manage blood sugar with your doctor before becoming pregnant. Your doctor may switch the type of insulin you use during pregnancy. It is unknown if this drug passes into breast milk. Insulin needs may change while breastfeeding. Consult your doctor before breast-feeding. Our Lantus (insulin glargine [rdna origin]) Injection Side Effects Drug Center provides a comprehensive view of available drug information on the potential side effects when taking this medication. This is not a complete list of side effects and others may occur. Call your doctor for medical advice about side effects. You may report side effects to FDA at 1-800-FDA-1088. Continue reading >>

4 Insulin Side Effects You May Not Have Known About

4 Insulin Side Effects You May Not Have Known About

3 0 The earliest injections given to people with diabetes were comprised of insulin derived from pigs. Nothing against pigs – we like bacon as much as the next person – but it was a relief when other forms of synthetic insulin were developed in the 1970s, enabling us to live longer, healthier lives with fewer contributions from our porcine friends. But as terrific as the stuff is for controlling diabetes, it’s not without side effects. Whether you’ve been taking insulin for a short time – or for a couple of decades like I have – you may sometimes wonder if that rumbling in your stomach is something you ate, or if it’s just your insulin talking. Here, from people in the know, are four little-known insulin side effects that you may not know about, even if you’ve been using insulin for years. An Inability to Tolerate Unreasonable People. Since insulin allows glucose to get where it needs to be (in our cells), it affects our blood-sugar levels rapidly. In the process, it may cause us to feel irritable, anxious and jittery, and totally unwilling to deal with the guy who cut in line at the coffee shop. Don’t worry; these unpleasant sensations should quickly resolve, and you’ll return to your normal, relaxed self. (If not, of course, consult your doctor.) Unfortunately, crazy people will still be among us, even after your insulin-induced irritability disappears. Things are Looking Blurry, and You Haven’t Been Drinking. When taking insulin, your vision may sometimes be blurry, and it’s not because your eyeglasses need cleaning or the aliens are about to beam you up. It’s just another potential side effect of insulin, particularly when you first start to take it. The good news is, not only will this resolve fairly quickly, but as your body adjusts, you Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Have Health Risks?

Does Insulin Have Health Risks?

If your doctor has prescribed insulin as a diabetes treatment, here's what to know about avoiding low blood sugar, weight gain, and other potential complications. Faced with the prospect of daily insulin injections, you may be more worried about needles and syringes than potential health risks of this diabetes treatment. In fact, insulin has been so finely tuned that health risks, side effects, and complications from insulin therapy for people with type 2 diabetes are fewer than ever before. That doesn’t mean problems don’t exist, but most are easily overcome with proper education, close communication with your doctor, and following his or her directions. Here are some potential side effects of insulin therapy that you should know about: Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar is the most serious complication associated with insulin. Also referred to as insulin reaction, it occurs when your blood sugar drops below a certain level. If your insulin dose is too high or is delivered too quickly, your blood sugar level may drop so low that it can impair brain function. In the most severe and untreated cases, low blood sugar can cause you to have a seizure, pass out, or even go into a coma. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar include feeling weak, drowsy, or dizzy, experiencing shakiness, confusion, anxiety, nausea, or headache, blurred vision, and sometimes a loss of consciousness. Although not always possible to do, the only way to know for certain if you're experiencing low blood sugar is to test your blood sugar level — a reading under 70 mg/dl often indicates hypoglycemia. Some people can dip to that level without any signs or symptoms, especially if they've had diabetes for a long time. If you test and see low blood sugar numbers yet feel no effects, talk Continue reading >>

What Is Insulin?

What Is Insulin?

Insulin is a hormone that allows your body to regulate sugar in the blood. It helps to keep your blood sugar levels from getting too high (hyperglycemia) or too low (hypoglycemia). Insulin was discovered as a treatment for diabetes in the 1920s, and soon Eli Lily began producing the extract in great quantities. Prior to this discovery, diabetes was considered untreatable and likely to result in death. Special cells called beta cells in the pancreas make insulin. With each meal, the beta cells release insulin to help the body use sugar in the blood or store it. People with type 1 diabetes cannot make insulin because their beta cells are damaged or destroyed. Those with type 2 diabetes don't make enough insulin or the body can't use it properly. People with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes may need to receive injections of synthetic or animal insulin to help their bodies regulate their blood sugar. Types of Insulin Doctors prescribe different types of injectable insulin to treat diabetes. These are: Rapid-acting insulin: This insulin starts working about 15 minutes after you inject it into the tissue just beneath the skin. It peaks in about one hour but keeps working for two to four hours. It's typically taken before a meal along with a long-acting insulin. There's also a type of rapid-acting insulin, Afrezza, that can be inhaled through the mouth, which may be more convenient for some people. Short-acting insulin: This insulin starts working about 30 minutes after you inject it. It peaks in about two to three hours but keeps working for three to six hours. It's typically given before a meal along with a long-acting insulin. Intermediate-acting insulin: This insulin starts working about two to four hours after you inject it. It peaks in about four to 12 hours but keeps wo Continue reading >>

Side Effects From Synthetic Insulin?

Side Effects From Synthetic Insulin?

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I found this site. Its about animal insulin vs. synthetic insulin. I got really afraid when I read about all the side effects from synthetic insulin. Is it really this bad, or is it just this guy who is mad about the animal insulin disappearing from the market? i think synthetic insulin is bad, that is why they made human insulin Isn't synthetic insulin the same as human insulin? i dont think so jon .....humulin = human ....synthetic=fake....lol Some members post a lot, without having anything to say. One can hope this diabetes forum doesnt turn in to a big chitchat. So-called human insulin is synthetic insulin and differs in many ways from real human insulin. Gene modified E-coli bacteria is used to produce human insulin. Human DNA is used to do this modification that is why its called human insulin. The result differs somewhat from real insulin, but it dont stop here. Some molecules in the produced insulin molecule chain are changed to give the insulin certain characteristic. So the end product is definitely synthetic. Only a small amount of the contents in vial is insulin. There is lot of other substances. Some is used to control how fast and how long the insulin should last after its injected. You might be surprised how much you can learn while chit chatting. Back to the point, the human insulin that you inject is synthetic. It was created to replace animal insulin. That was what I thought. Thanks for clarifying for me. Synthetic insulin is horrible. I am a type 2 diabetic and started Lantus. I gained a lot of weight in a short period of time became extremely tired, like could not functio Continue reading >>

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Applies to insulin: injectable liquid, injectable solution, subcutaneous suspension Endocrine Hypoglycemia is the most common and serious side effect of insulin, occurring in approximately 16% of type 1 and 10% of type II diabetic patients (the incidence varies greatly depending on the populations studied, types of insulin therapy, etc). Although there are counterregulatory endocrinologic responses to hypoglycemia, some responses are decreased, inefficient, or absent in some patients. Severe hypoglycemia usually presents first as confusion, sweating, or tachycardia, and can result in coma, seizures, cardiac arrhythmias, neurological deficits, and death. Blood or urine glucose monitoring is recommended in patients who are at risk of hypoglycemia or who do not recognize the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia. The risk for developing hypoglycemia is higher in patients receiving intensive or continuous infusion insulin therapy. The association between insulin and dyslipidemia is currently being evaluated.[Ref] Permanent neuropsychological impairment has been associated with recurrent episodes of severe hypoglycemia. In one retrospective study of 600 randomly selected patients with insulin-treated diabetes mellitus, the only reliable predictors of severe hypoglycemia were a history of hypoglycemia, a history of hypoglycemia-related injury or convulsion, and the duration of insulin therapy. Those with a history of hypoglycemia had been treated with insulin for 17.4 years, which was significantly longer than the 14.3 years in the insulin-treated patients without a history of hypoglycemia. Human insulin does not appear to be associated with hypoglycemic episodes more often than animal insulin. Caution is recommended when switching from animal (either bovine or pork) to purified Continue reading >>

Insulin For Diabetes Treatment (types, Side Effects, And Preparations)

Insulin For Diabetes Treatment (types, Side Effects, And Preparations)

What is the dosage and how is insulin administrated? A meal should be consumed within 30 minutes after administering regular insulin Insulin usually is administered by subcutaneous injection into the abdominal wall, thigh, buttocks (gluteal region), or upper arm. Injection sites should be rotated within the same region. Some insulins (for example, regular insulin) also may be administered intravenously. The dose is individualized for each patient. A combination of short or rapid acting and intermediate or long acting insulin typically are used Some patients may develop resistance to insulin and require increasing doses. Multiple daily insulin injections or continuous subcutaneous infusions via a pump closely mimic pancreatic insulin secretion. Insulin sliding scales (doses of insulin that are based on the glucose level ) may be used for managing critically ill hospitalized patients. What are the contraindications, warnings, and precautions for insulin? Hypersensitivity to insulin or its excipients (inactive co-ingredients) Hypoglycemia may occur and is the most common side effect of insulin treatment. Severe, life-threatening allergic reactions, including anaphylaxis, may occur. Hypokalemia (low blood potassium) may occur because insulin stimulates movement of potassium from blood into cells. Combining insulin with potassium-lowering drugs may increase the risk of hypokalemia. Hepatic (liver) impairment may reduce the insulin requirement. Renal (kidney) dysfunction may reduce the insulin requirement. Illness, emotional disturbance, or other stress may alter the insulin requirement. Intravenous administration increases the risk of hypoglycemia and hypokalemia. Continue reading >>

How Safe Is Your Synthetic Insulin? Studies Find Possible Harmful Side-effects

How Safe Is Your Synthetic Insulin? Studies Find Possible Harmful Side-effects

How Safe is Your Synthetic Insulin? Studies find Possible Harmful Side-Effects Naturally sourced animal insulin was the first type to be administered to humans to control diabetes. Extracted from pancreases of cows and pigs, there is sound evidence that animal insulins are proving tobe far less a risk than the synthetic insulins widely used today. At present, animal insulin is no longer available in the U.S. and has been replaced by synthetics known as human insulin and insulin analogues. Synthetic human insulin was introduced in the US in 1982 and touted as an improvement. However, there are no proven clinical advantages over animal insulin. Recently, insulin analogues have been introduced. They are produced by genetically modifying GM human insulin and have not yet been tested for long term safety. A 30-year report conducted by The Insulin Dependent Diabetes Trust has beenexploring patient's and physician's concerns pertaining to the long-term use of synthetic insulins and are reporting evidence that they may worsendiabetes-related disorders as well as increase the risk of other serious side effects such as hypocalcemia, digestive disorders, seizures, and comas. A report by the Public Health Agency of Canada stated that the introduction of synthetic insulin to replace animal insulin also resulted in reports of adverse reactions. The newest synthetic analogues have not been proven to be safe, and it is clear that there may be additional harmful effects. As a result, the Canadian government has ensured that animal-sourced insulin remain available in Canada. Source Replacement of Animal Insulin with Synthetics: What you Should Know Since the introduction of synthetic insulin, there have been thousands of complaints by patientsand doctors concerned with the deterioration Continue reading >>

Animal Insulin Vs Synthetic Insulin: Similar Genes, Different Origins

Animal Insulin Vs Synthetic Insulin: Similar Genes, Different Origins

Humans with diabetes started using insulin extracted from the pancreas of cows or pigs in 1922. Some people developed allergies to animal (or natural) insulin, but its use saved countless lives. Today, most people who need it use synthetic or human insulin, first manufactured in the early 1980s. Though many individuals complained of side effects after switching from animal to synthetic insulin, the synthetic type is now prescribed almost exclusively in many parts of the world. Whether natural or synthetic, the therapeutic use of insulin by humans depends on our similarity to nonhuman creatures. Our Genetic Cousins Proteins are similar to a string of beads, and the “beads” are called amino acids. The amino acids that make up our human insulin protein are nearly identical to the string of amino acids in cow and pig insulin. Pork insulin is different by one amino acid, and bovine insulin by three – similar enough for most humans to use. In the 1950s, when the complete protein structure of insulin was deciphered, some companies began modifying animal insulin. They removed the different amino acid from pig insulin, replacing it with the human counterpart. So, other than its origin, the pig insulin was made human. Although insulin was being modified before the creation of the synthetics, the production of synthetic insulin has nothing to do with altering the proteins of other mammals. It involves life forms much smaller. Synthetic Soup A protein, such as insulin, is created when its amino acid sequence (genetic information) is copied and then reproduced. Scientists who have learned the genetic sequence of human insulin create copies of it by splicing together pieces of genetic material in the proper order. Circular strands of DNA, called plasmids, are extracted from bac Continue reading >>

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Tweet If you have recently been prescribed insulin, or have switched to a new type of insulin, you may be concerned about the side effects. You might also be experiencing side effects and not know where they are coming from. Similarly, you may be looking for information for a friend or family member. What are the side effects of insulin? Insulin side effects amongst diabetics are rare, but when they do occur, allergic reactions can be severe and can pose a significant risk to health. What do I do if I have an adverse reaction to my insulin? If you experience mild allergic reactions such as swelling, itching or redness around the injection site, experts advise diabetics to consult their GPs. Similarly, sustained nausea and vomiting are signs of insulin allergy. How do I know if my insulin is working? When taking insulin, diabetics are advised by experts to regularly check blood glucose levels using testing kits. If blood glucose tests show fluctuating or above-average blood sugar levels, diabetes is not being properly controlled and insulin is not working. Avoiding infection when taking insulin When taking insulin, try to avoid infection by using disposable needles and syringes, and sterilising any reusable equipment. Do some drugs interact with insulin? Some drugs are known to interact with insulin, and diabetics should be aware of this list. Your GP or physician should provide detailed information of how any extra drug affects insulin. Some medications that are known to influence insulin are shown below, but diabetics should consult their GP for further information: Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insuli Continue reading >>

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