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Spoiled Insulin

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Uses Insulin regular is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a short-acting insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used in combination with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. This medication may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin). How to use Insulin Regular Human Solution Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin regular should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin regular may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, the buttocks, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle because very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) may occur. Do not rub the area after the injection. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do Continue reading >>

Storage Of Unopened Insulin:

Storage Of Unopened Insulin:

Insulin is very sensitive to sunlight, indoor lights, and to extremely hot or cold temperature. Insulin is not OK to use if exposed to very hot or cold weather. The three drug manufacturers of insulin in the United States say UNOPENED insulin is best stored inside the fridge [2° to 8°Celcius (36° to 46°Fahrenheit)]. UNOPENED insulin stored in the refrigerator is good until the expiration date printed on the insulin box. The expiration date will usually be 1 year from the date of purchase but you have to check the box to find out. Storage of OPENED insulin: Once open there are different storage needs for insulin. What does OPEN mean? This does NOT mean removed from the box. OPEN means the insulin cap is removed and the rubber stopper was punctured. Vials and pens have different needs for storage. These differences can lead to confusion. Therefore, it is very important for you to become familiar with the recommendations for the insulin product that you use. What is an OPEN vial? Vial: Once the vial is punctured, it is OPEN. Once you stick a needle in the vial, it is OPEN. OPEN vials can be stored in the fridge or at CONTROLLED room temperature. Regardless of where it is stored, OPEN insulin will only last 28 days before it must be thrown in the trash. Insulin kept in the fridge should be removed and allowed to reach room temperature before injection. PEN: Once used for the first time, insulin pens should not be stored in the fridge. Instead, they should be stored at CONTROLLED room temperature. The number of days you can use the pen will depend on which pen you use. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Pens last 7-28 days if stored at CONTROLLED room temperature. The number of days depends on which pen you use. PUMP: Once 6 IMPORTANT Storage tips for all insulin: Do not Continue reading >>

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

What Does Cloudy Insulin Mean?

Insulin can change when stored, says the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Many factors speed up the change, including warm temperatures and shaking the insulin bottle. That’s why the ADA recommends that you avoid carrying your insulin in your pocket, especially if you are an active person. Keep it in a refrigerator, cupboard, purse, briefcase or backpack, and protect it from heat and motion. If regular insulin becomes cloudy, throw it away, says the ADA. It has lost its effectiveness, and won’t keep your blood sugar from getting too high. If your insulin is a mix of regular and NPH or ultralente insulins, you may be getting NPH or ultralente in the bottle of regular insulin. This, too, will make it cloudy. If in doubt, discard the old bottle and replace it with a new one. Reprinted from 101 Tips for Improving Your Blood Sugar by the University of New Mexico Diabetes Care Team. Copyright by the American Diabetes Association. Used by permission. All rights reserved. Play Video Play Loaded: 0% Progress: 0% Remaining Time -0:00 This is a modal window. Foreground --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Opaque Background --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Window --- White Black Red Green Blue Yellow Magenta Cyan --- Opaque Semi-Transparent Transparent Font Size 50% 75% 100% 125% 150% 175% 200% 300% 400% Text Edge Style None Raised Depressed Uniform Dropshadow Font Family Default Monospace Serif Proportional Serif Monospace Sans-Serif Proportional Sans-Serif Casual Script Small Caps Defaults Done Connect with Us Get more healthy food for thought – check out our posts on Health Bistro and Lifescript TV videos on YouTube. Plus, join the fun and conversation on Google+, Facebook, Twitter, Continue reading >>

Insulin Angel – The Smart Medication Tracker

Insulin Angel – The Smart Medication Tracker

8th April - Diabetes is a chronic medical condition that affects more than 380 million people worldwide. Its impact on global healthcare spending is immense: it is estimated that one in nine dollars of healthcare spending is spent on diabetes. Many innovations like pumps, pens and blood glucose-monitors make life with diabetes much easier than it used to be, but there are still countless daily challenges people with diabetes have to cope with. Insulin Angel, the first temperature and proximity medication tracker, is the first product which addresses two of these challenges: keeping insulin at a safe temperature, and not losing or forgetting the medication or the medical kit. Designed by Pilotfish, Insulin Angel consists of a small device connected to a phone application via Bluetooth Low Energy. The device is placed with the medical kit, together with the medication and glucose-monitoring device and tracks the ambient temperature. The user is notified by the App when temperature approaches a critical level or when it exceeds it. Insulin Angel can also be kept with the stock of insulin in the fridge and alerts if storage conditions change in absence of the user, for example if the fridge is broken and stops cooling, or if it malfunctions and gets below the appropriate cooling point. Insulin Angel helps people reduce the amount of medication wasted because of doubt, and decreases the risk of taking ineffective or spoiled insulin. Insulin Angel is useful not just to diabetics but to every person with a medical condition who relies on vital medication/equipment. The initial release of Insulin Angel will support some asthma and rheumatism medications. Marc Nagel, Pilotfish Co-founder and the father of a child with type I diabetes got involved with the project, leading the pr Continue reading >>

No More Worrying About Insulin – Diabetes Daily Review

No More Worrying About Insulin – Diabetes Daily Review

“How often do you wonder whether the insulin you have with you has spoiled due to varying temperatures? I know I worry about the insulin that stays in my testing case, whether I’m traveling or even just going out for the day. Especially when you get to the bottom of the vial and the insulin just doesn’t seem as potent as it did when it was first opened. MedAngel hopes to help alleviate some of our worries with their temperature sensor. It’s a small device, just about the length of an insulin vial. It easily slips into any case or bag, where ever you prefer to keep your insulin when traveling. At $49.00, it’s well worth it if you are one to be worried about how temperatures can affect your medications.” Sarah, T1D Sugabetic.me Continue reading >>

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

What Are The Dangers Of A Sugar Count Over 500?

Blood sugar control is a critical aspect of diabetes management. People without diabetes typically have fasting blood sugar readings below 100 milligrams per deciliter. If you are diabetic, your doctor sets an individualized blood sugar goal that you aim for with the help of an individualized treatment regimen. A reading higher than your target indicates your blood sugar is not under control, and having a reading over 500 is a medical emergency. Your body needs glucose to function properly, but it's unhealthy for high levels to circulate in your bloodstream. The hormone insulin regulates blood sugar by allowing glucose to get into your cells. Typically, blood sugar is considered high when it's 160 milligrams per deciliter or above your glucose target, notes the Joslin Diabetes Center. Your doctor may need to adjust your treatment plan if your glucose remains above 180 milligrams per deciliter for three consecutive days. If glucose stays elevated for a long time, it can affect your eyes, kidneys and heart. Ketoacidosis A dangerously high blood sugar level increases your risk for diabetes-related ketoacidosis. When glucose circulates in your bloodstream and can't get into your cells, your cells don't get the energy they need. To compensate, your body begins to burn fat for fuel, producing acids called ketones. These acids build up in your bloodstream and can poison your body when levels get too high. This happens when your body doesn't have enough insulin and is more common with Type 1 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends checking your urine for ketones when your glucose is higher than 240 milligrams per deciliter. Hyperosmolar Syndrome Your kidneys typically excrete extra glucose to help compensate for high blood sugar levels, but when glucose is extrem Continue reading >>

Think Like A Pancreas//your Cheat Guide: Chapter 9

Think Like A Pancreas//your Cheat Guide: Chapter 9

Going to extremes Part II: Dealing with high blood sugars. When we first think of high blood sugars, our mind instantly thinks of that post-meal spike. That moment you that thought you calculated just right........ but then 2 hours later your meter magically reveals: 251 [insert indifferent face here]. We have all experienced this as Type 1’s. #ifeelyourpain Apart from the obvious calculating (and miscalculating), are you aware of the two HUGE things working against us? Insulin timing and amylin. _______ You and your friend just ordered some delicious cupcake’s from your favorite bakery. You both sit down. She instantly bites into her gooey red velvet cupcake, and you guesstimate the 51 carbs, dose, and then indulge in your peanut butter chocolate cupcake. Her body immediately releases insulin & amylin—both helping to keep blood sugars stable and minimize any spike. As a Type 1 diabetic, you have neither of these hormones. You are 100% dependent on your insulin dose and the perfect timing of when to dose -- It can take 15 minutes to start working, 60-90 minutes to peak, and 3-5 hours to finish working. While insulin is the obvious (major) hormone we lack as Type 1’s, amylin may be something you are unaware of. In reality, we can (and clearly do) live without amylin, but not having amylin is a huge factor on why our levels rise so quickly post-meal and why it’s extra important to take our doses at least 10 to 15 minutes before. So what exactly is it? “At the base of the pancreas is a cluster of cells called the islets of Langerhans and contained within those cells are the cells that constantly measure blood glucose levels and produce insulin as needed to keep blood sugar within a normal range. Along with insulin, beta cells secrete amylin, a hormone that, amo Continue reading >>

Insulin Myths And Facts

Insulin Myths And Facts

Starting insulin can feel like a big step when you have type 2 diabetes. If you are taking other medications for your diabetes and your blood sugar numbers are still rising, it may be time to talk with your health care provider about insulin. For a lot of people this can be a tough conversation. Even though millions of people use insulin to treat their diabetes every day, there are many people who still have a bad image of insulin and are afraid of what taking insulin might mean. Most of these fears are based on myths. Here are some common myths about insulin and the true facts about what it means to take insulin and how it can help you. Myth: Taking insulin means I’ve failed in taking care of my diabetes. I wouldn’t need insulin if I had just taken better care of myself. Fact: Needing insulin does not mean that you have failed in your diabetes management. Because type 2 diabetes changes over time, after a while your pancreas may not be able to keep up with your body’s need for insulin—no matter what you’ve done to manage your diabetes. When other medicines no longer keep your blood sugar on target, insulin is often the next step. Myth: Insulin doesn’t really work anyway. Fact: In fact, insulin is proven to lower your blood sugar! You may think of diabetes as a “sugar” problem, but it’s also an insulin problem. Some of the insulins used today are designed to closely mimic the insulin your body makes naturally. When you take insulin, you are replacing the insulin your body is no longer making. Your health care provider can talk to you about both the benefits and possible side effects of insulin. Myth: Insulin always causes my blood sugar to go too low. Fact: It is true that insulin can cause low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) which is the most common side e Continue reading >>

Bad Insulin: When To Toss The Vial

Bad Insulin: When To Toss The Vial

Recently, the question was asked: "Does anyone have any tricks for knowing when it’s time to toss a vial of insulin?" The writer was concerned about whether a vial contains bad insulin - that is, insulin that has a diminished ability to decrease blood sugar levels compared to what was expected. There are lots of discussions on the Internet about how to identify bad insulin, so I’ll focus on what to do with the insulin and the vial when bad insulin is suspected. I’d like to point out that there are two different categories of what to do with bad insulin: First, contacting the manufacturer or your pharmacy about returning suspected bad insulin, and second, deciding to discard a vial of partially-used insulin. _Contacting the manufacturer or pharmacy: _ For many insulin products, the liquid that contains insulin should be clear and colorless. Therefore, if you open a box of this kind of insulin, and find that the liquid in the vial is discolored, or that the liquid has particles floating in it, there’s something wrong. In such a case, the insulin should not be used, and the manufacturer should be notified. They will want to take back the vial and test it, and they will arrange for you to get a replacement vial. For example, one label states "Only use XXX that is clear and colorless. If your XXX is cloudy or slightly colored, return it to your pharmacy for a replacement." If you are using a type of insulin that is naturally cloudy (such as NPH), you might find small white clumps that sank to the bottom of the bottle, or a white coating or “frosting” on the inside wall of the glass vial. Again, the insulin should not be used, and arrangements made to return the vial for replacement. There’s another circumstance about bad insulin that might occur, and doesn’t Continue reading >>

Proper Handling And Storage

Proper Handling And Storage

Go to site For Pet Owners Handling Vetsulin® (porcine insulin zinc suspension), like many other insulin preparations, is a suspension. The active ingredients in Vetsulin are present in the precipitate and in the clear supernatant. Therefore, before administering, the insulin should be shaken until a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension is obtained. This applies to both the 10 mL vial and 2.7 mL cartridges. Foam on the surface of the suspension formed during shaking should be allowed to disperse before the product is used and, if required, the product should be gently mixed to maintain a homogeneous, uniformly milky suspension before use. Clumps or white particles can form in insulin suspensions: do not use an insulin vial or cartridge if visible clumps or white particles persist after shaking thoroughly. When loading a new cartridge into VetPen, priming is necessary to remove air bubbles. You begin this process by dialing a 1-unit test dose. Holding the pen vertically with the needle pointing upward, you tap the cartridge gently with your finger a few times to push any air bubbles to the top. You then push and hold the release button towards the needle until the arrow on the pen body points to the start line on the dose selector. It is very important to repeat these steps a number of times until insulin drips actively or squirts out of the needle tip and no air bubbles are visible in the cartridge window as the VetPen is turned upside down. Once primed successfully, the cartridge is ready for use. In addition, clients should be advised not to reuse insulin syringes or VetPen needles. One of the main concerns is the potential for bacterial infection. Also, the silicon coating inside the syringe may contaminate the insulin vial with silicon, resulting in a white preci Continue reading >>

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Handling A Diabetes Emergency

Emergencies can happen at any time, so it's best to be prepared and know what to do if an emergency occurs. Talking with your veterinarian is a crucial part of being informed and prepared to handle emergencies. Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) The most common side effect experienced with insulin therapy is hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia can be caused by: Missing or delaying food. Change in food, diet, or amount fed. Infection or illness. Change in the body's need for insulin. Diseases of the adrenal, pituitary, or thyroid glands, or progression of liver or kidney disease. Interaction with other drugs (such as steroids). Change (increase) in exercise. Signs of hypoglycemia may occur suddenly and can include: Weakness Depression Behavioral changes Muscle twitching Anxiety Seizures Coma Death See below for a list of other side effects. What to do If your pet is conscious, rub a tablespoon of corn syrup on his or her gums. When your pet is able to swallow, feed him or her a usual meal and contact your veterinarian. If your pet is unconscious or having a seizure, this is a medical emergency. CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN. In the meantime, you should immediately treat your pet rather than delaying management. Pour a small amount of a sugar solution (eg, corn syrup) onto your finger and then rub the sugar solution onto your pet's gums. The sugar is absorbed very quickly and your pet should respond in 1 to 2 minutes. The sugar solution should never be poured directly into your pet's mouth since there is a risk that the solution will be inhaled into the lungs. Once your pet has responded to the sugar administration and is sitting up, it can be fed a small amount of its regular food. Once the pet has stabilized, it should be transported to your veterinarian for evaluation. Your pet's diet Continue reading >>

What Are Signs That My Insulin Is Not Okay To Use?

What Are Signs That My Insulin Is Not Okay To Use?

Never use insulin if it looks abnormal. Regular, lispro, aspart, and glargine insulins are clear. If you use clear insulin, always check for any floating particles, cloudiness, or change in color. This could be a sign that your insulin is contaminated or has lost its strength. Other types of insulin come as suspensions. This means that the material is not completely dissolved, and you might be able to see solid material floating in liquid. However, it should look uniformly cloudy. If you are using NPH, check that your insulin is free of any large clumps of material. Do not use any insulin if you see chunks of material floating around. These changes could mean that crystals or aggregates are forming and the insulin is spoiled or denatured. This can be caused by too much shaking of the insulin bottle or storing insulin at temperatures that are either too hot or too cold. If you have been instructed to dilute your insulin, use only the diluent recommended by the manufacturer. Properly diluted insulin is good for 2 to 6 weeks stored in the refrigerator. If you find anything wrong with your insulin right after you buy it, return it immediately. If the condition develops later, try to figure out whether you have handled or stored the insulin the wrong way. If not, talk to your pharmacist about a refund or exchange. Continue reading >>

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

Keeping An Eye On Your Insulin

For millions of people with diabetes, technology has supplied us with wonderful, helpful aids to help control blood sugar. While some of these medications come in pill form and remain stable when stored out of light and at moderate temperatures, people with diabetes who use insulin need to depend on more than technology to make sure their insulin is in top form. As associate dean and professor of pharmacy at Washington State University, a certified diabetes educator and a person with diabetes for more than 50 years, Keith Campbell knows the importance of keeping an eye on insulin. Campbell believes that establishing a routine surrounding insulin use helps ensure the product stays potent and stable. Step One: Check the Label Campbell advises that the first thing a person with diabetes should do is check the insulin’s expiration date, even before leaving the pharmacy. “Drug companies and the FDA are very conservative with the dates,” says Campbell. This means they tend set expiration date at the earliest time the insulin could possibly go bad, and sometimes even earlier. Sofia Iqbal, RPh, a drug information scientist with Novo Nordisk Pharmaceuticals, confirms this. “Expiration dates and storage guidelines are based on stability data obtained for batches of each formulation of insulin,” Iqbal says. She adds that the dates are valid as long as the insulin is kept stored under the correct conditions. “Never use insulin after the expiration date printed on the label and carton,” Iqbal warns. If you get your insulin home and discover the expiration date has passed, what should you do? Campbell advises that you return it to the pharmacy immediately for replacement. Step Two: Examine the Insulin Eli Lilly and Company’s Kara Appell, RPh, a medical information adm Continue reading >>

When Good Insulin Goes Bad.

When Good Insulin Goes Bad.

Ninety percent of the time, my high blood sugar has an identifiable reason, and there’s a cluster of common causes. Did I under-estimate the carbs in a snack and therefore under-bolus? Did I over-treat a low blood sugar? Did I eat without bolusing at all (it happens)? Is there a lot of stress floating around that I’m responding to? Most of the time, those questions cover the why. Once in a while, my highs are for rogue reasons, like an air bubble in my pump tubing. Or when I eat something carb-heavy right after an insulin pump site change (it’s like that first bolus doesn’t “catch” somehow). Or I forgot to reconnect my pump. Or if the cat bites through my pump tubing. But rarely, if ever, is one of my high blood sugars the result of bad insulin. Except it totally happened last week, when two days of bullshit high numbers had me mitigating every possible variable … other than swapping out the insulin itself. (And clearly I’m stubborn and/or in denial about the quality of my insulin’s influence on my blood sugars?) I rage-bolused. I exercised. I low-carbed the eff out of an entire day. I did a site change at midnight to take a bite out of the highs. Nothing. The downward-sloping arrow on my Dexcom graph had gone on hiatus. (Always a punched-in-the-gut feeling to see the word HIGH on a Dexcom graph, accompanied by an up arrow.) But ditching the bottle of insulin entirely and swapping in a new Humalog vial? That did the trick in a big way. For once, it was the insulin. Next time, it will surely be the cat. Share: Continue reading >>

Insulin…an Undeserved Bad Reputation

Insulin…an Undeserved Bad Reputation

I feel sorry for insulin. Insulin has been bullied and beaten up. It has been cast as an evil hormone that should be shunned. However, insulin doesn't deserve the treatment it has received. Insulin: A Primer Insulin is a hormone that regulates the levels of sugar in your blood. When you eat a meal, the carbohydrate in the meal is broken down into glucose (a sugar used as energy by your cells). The glucose enters your blood. Your pancreas senses the rising glucose and releases insulin. Insulin allows the glucose to enter your liver, muscle, and fat cells. Once your blood glucose starts to come back down, insulin levels come back down too. This cycle happens throughout the day. You eat a meal, glucose goes up, insulin goes up, glucose goes down, and insulin goes down. Insulin levels are typically lowest in the early morning since it's usually been at least 8 hours after your last meal. Insulin doesn't just regulate blood sugar. It has other effects as well. For example, it stimulates your muscles to build new protein (a process called protein synthesis). It also inhibits lipolysis (the breakdown of fat) and stimulates lipogenesis (the creation of fat). It is the latter effect by which insulin has gotten its bad reputation. Because carbohydrate stimulates your body to release insulin, it has caused some people to argue that a diet high in carbohydrate will cause you to gain fat. Their reasoning, in a nutshell, goes like this: High Carbohydrate Diet -> High Insulin -> Increased Lipogenesis/Decreased Lipolysis -> Increased Body Fat -> Obesity Using this same logic, they argue that a low carbohydrate diet is best for fat loss, because insulin levels are kept low. Their logic chain goes something like this: Low Carbohydrate Diet -> Low Insulin -> Decreased Lipogenesis/Increase Continue reading >>

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