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Snacking Insulin Resistance

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

The Insulin Resistance Diet Protocol

Understanding the cellular mechanisms of insulin resistance helps us choose more effective therapeutic interventions for the treatment and prevention of prediabetes and type 2 diabetes. Insulin resistance is present in individuals who are obese and those with diabetes mellitus. Several studies have found that an insulin resistance diet protocol and exercise can alter insulin signaling pathways and delay the onset of insulin resistance. It’s estimated that the number of diabetes sufferers in the world will double from about 190 million to 325 million during the next 25 years. (1) It’s obvious that we need to pay more attention to our lifestyle habits and make some changes. An insulin resistance diet, similar to a diabetic diet plan, helps you lose excess weight and regulate your insulin and blood glucose levels in order to reduce your risk of developing prediabetes and diabetes. Insulin Resistance Diet Research suggests that the primary cause of insulin resistance is excess weight, especially excess fat around the waist. Fortunately, weight loss can help the body respond better to insulin. The Diabetes Prevention Program and other large studies indicate that people with insulin resistance and prediabetes can often prevent or delay developing diabetes by changing their diets to follow an insulin resistance diet, along with losing weight. Here are seven ways to start eating an insulin resistance diet. 1. Limit Carbohydrates Research published in Diabetes, Metabolic Syndrome and Obesity suggests that monitoring carbohydrate intake, whether by carbohydrate counting or experience-based estimation, remains a key strategy in achieving glycemic control. Although all carbohydrates can be incorporated into carbohydrate counting, for good health, carbohydrates from vegetables, Continue reading >>

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

What Is The Perfect Diet For Weight Loss And Diabetics? What Is Insulin Resistance?

Have you heard but don’t understand what is insulin resistance? Are you gaining weight no matter what you try? Are you pre diabetic or been diagnosed as a diabetic (T1 or T2)? Has your appetite always been out of control? Well watch this fabulous Tedx talk by Dr Sarah Hallberg and see how insulin resistance can be playing a part in all the above conditions. Everyone can benefit from cutting carbs. Not only will it reduce your risk of T2 diabetes, obesity, cardiovascular risk factors and more importantly, your inflammatory markers are reduced which has huge implications for cancer prevention. Why are the guidelines still recommending for diabetics to consumes carbohydrates when they are intolerant to them? The message for so long has been “eat whatever you want, then medicate for it”. This is such nonsense. None of us should be eating so many carbs, let alone diabetics. We can have the beginnings of insulin resistance for years, even decades, before we are classed as pre diabetic or T2 diabetic. Having such high circulating levels of insulin is the problem. High insulin levels leads to insulin resistance. Our cells start to require more and more insulin to function. Click To Tweet So now you have watched the talk, lets look again at what insulin resistance is. We are all advised to eat far too many carbs, whether it is ‘healthy wholegrain’, sweets, ice cream, ‘natural’ muesli bars, cereals, bread or potatoes. This constant high level of circulating glucose (which all carbs are converted to) requires more and more insulin to push that glucose into your cells as glycogen. We can only store so much glycogen in our body so the remainder is stored as fat. Insulin is our fat storing hormone. Remember that again, insulin is our fat storing hormone. So whilst our b Continue reading >>

Why Snacking Can Stall Fat Loss And Fast Metabolism

Why Snacking Can Stall Fat Loss And Fast Metabolism

Discuss snacking among fitness and nutrition experts and you’ll likely receive radically different views. Advocates argue snacks or “mini-meals” can curb appetite, stabilize blood sugar, and help you eat less during a subsequent meal. Based on my research and experience helping people who struggle with weight-loss resistance, I’m against snacking for fat loss and fast metabolism. Snacking has become a multibillion-dollar industry where savvy manufacturers push an ever-widening array of Frankenfoods loaded with high-fructose corn syrup and trans fat. Worse, gluten-free snacks, 100-calorie sugary packs, and nutrient-added cookies give people a halo effect about repeated snacking that contributes to overeating and weight gain. Children and adolescents are particular targets for snack manufacturers. For instance, a study in the journal Preventive Medicine found the prevalence of snacking increased from 77 to 84 percent between 1977-1978 and 1994-1996 for children and adolescents. Granted, that’s not an astronomical jump: It shows snacking was common even 35 years ago. Sugary drinks proved a major culprit here, but more importantly, high-fat, salty snacks doubled during that time. Researchers concluded the “large increase in total energy and energy density of snacks among young adults in the United States may be contributing to our obesity epidemic.” No kidding. But everyone, not just young adults, becomes more susceptible to fat gain when they snack. Here’s why. Snacking Raises Insulin Levels Whenever you eat, your body secretes insulin, which delivers sugar from your bloodstream to your cells, then to your liver and muscle for storage. These storage units, however, only take what they need. They aren’t greedy. If you’ve still got sugar hanging out in yo Continue reading >>

To Snack Or Not To Snack?

To Snack Or Not To Snack?

//cdn.shopify.com/s/files/1/1921/0945/articles/snacking_large.jpg?v=1497950639 Recently there has been a lot of media about not snacking and actually allowing your body to feel hungry between meals. But theres a big benefit to having two to three between-meal snacks every day. Be warned: This explanation gets a little geeky, but its important to understand that eating (or not eating) triggers specific reactions in your body. When you dont snack, your body starts to go into starvation mode that it might not be getting food for a while, so better start shoring up the fat stores! Thats probably not what you want. Healthy snacking helps keep your blood sugar steady and prevents insulin resistance. It also helps stimulate the conversion of T4 to T3 in the thyroidthe bodys fat-burning hormones. When you dont snack the body produces hungry hormones: serotonin, dopamine, and especially leptin, allowing the body to feel hunger. Some people feel that not snacking will stimulate the metabolism once the body has eaten. In actuality, what we are finding from a biochemistry perspective is that when we start to secrete those hungry hormones, or those starvation hormones and cortisol, our body converts a larger portion of T4 to Reverse T3, which is actually a fat storage version of the T3 (metabolically active) thyroid hormone. Yikes! We are talking about more than 90% of what regulates the metabolism. Cortisol can also cause insulin resistance. Insulin is the key that unlocks the cell wall allowing blood glucose or sugars to be escorted across the cell wall and be broken down or metabolized by the body giving off energy. Insulin resistance, meaning that even though insulin is produced by the pancreas, the body becomes resistant to allowing it to be effective. Typically a protein and Continue reading >>

No Snacks? No Such Thing As A 'healthy Snack?' :(

No Snacks? No Such Thing As A 'healthy Snack?' :(

No Snacks? No Such Thing as a 'Healthy Snack?' :( This topic contains 21 replies, has 8 voices, and was last updated by Stephen T 1 year, 5 months ago . Viewing 22 posts - 1 through 22 (of 22 total) In 9.5 weeks (move over Kim Basinger) I have lost 18 to 20 pounds (I count it as 18 since water weight and the variance in my bathroom scales means that over a day my weight can vary by up to 2.5 pounds.) Thats 8 to 9 kg, or about 1.3 stone. I know that the ultimate challenge will be to KEEP this weight off, plus the weight I still plan to lose. Heres the thing: I nearly always have a snack at tea time around 16:00/ 4 p.m. Since starting 5:2, I have sought to eat a snack like a handful of almonds (14 make 100 calories) or a teaspoon of peanut butter on half a banana. This is a significant improvement over my former handful of cookies or dish of ice cream or worst of all, candy bar. I eat this sort of thing every day I include it in my FD. My FD is breakfast, a thin soup and half a banana, the snack, and maybe some salad greens for an early dinner at 6 p.m. So no, I personally do not fast for a period of more than 13 hours, although as the fast day progresses, I do eat less and less. (I am the reverse of many, I want my bigger meals up front.) But: I have skimmed the Obesity Code and read this quote: The balance between the fed state (insulin dominant) and the fasted state (insulin deficient) has been completely destroyed. We are now spending most of our time in the fed state. We are taught to eat the moment we roll out of bed. We are taught to eat throughout the day and again just before we sleep. We spend up to 18 hours in the insulin-dominant state, with only six hours insulin-deficient. I want to know if the author, Dr. Fung, has any biochemical research to back his clai Continue reading >>

Dangers Of Frequent Eating

Dangers Of Frequent Eating

Contrary to what you may have been told, our hunter-gatherer ancestors did not have the luxury of eating 6 meals a day. For them, it was feast or famine. Our very presence as a species is due to the fact that humans were able to endure long periods of time without food. What happened? With food around every corner, have we lost our ability to tolerate missing a meal? In this article, I will share the risks and potential dangers of eating 6 meals a day and the amazing benefits of eating 3. Please read on as I ruffle some feathers in the Grazing Camp… What Kind of Fuel is your Body Burning? When we talk about burning fat, what we are actually referring to is the process of using fat as our fuel, our source of energy. It’s a chemical process, not just a metaphor for losing weight. But fat is only one kind of fuel that can be utilized by our bodies, and carbohydrates – or sugars – are another. When your body has both available, it will burn the sugars first (because they burn fast) and the fat second (because it burns slow). Fat-Burning Benefits As it turns out, burning fat has a plethora of benefits beyond weight management. Fat is the most precious source of fuel for the body. It is the body’s calm, non-emergency fuel. It burns slowly and steadily, providing energy for many hours straight. By contrast, sugar burns quickly. Sugar and carbohydrate fuels provide quick bursts of energy that often end up in a crash. Burning fat detoxifies us and neutralizes excess acids that build up from stress. The problem is that many of us have lost the ability to burn fat effectively and are chronically storing fat and gaining weight. Note: I am not saying we should only burn fat. Humans thrive when we burn a balance of fat and carbs. 6 Meals a Day for Weight Loss and Consistent Continue reading >>

Why Snacking Is Bad For You

Why Snacking Is Bad For You

If you are like me, you have probably heard this advice time and time again: you need to eat 5 to 6 smaller meals throughout the day, and should focus on putting something into your body every 2 hours or so. I cant tell you how many different sources I have heard this from, in fact, there are quite a few research articles that support this way of eating . While you may see some positive changes in your metabolism and blood sugar levels when grazing, your body will quickly get used to this way of eating. When this happens, your cravings will increase as your body will expect food on a regular basis due to the constant repetition. In addition, your blood sugar and insulin levels will spike, ultimately leading you down the path to insulin sensitivity, which can have many downside and dangerous effects on your body. These can range from sugar cravings and storing fat in the short run, to chronic diseases like heart disease, diabetes, and even cancer in the long run. This is why I strongly disagree with the concept of grazing. If you look back to our pre-agricultural ancestors, they didnt have the access to food around the clock like we do in modern times. While having food at our fingertips 24/7 can be quite beneficial and convenient to us in many ways, as you can see, the negatives certainly can outweigh the positives. Instead, you want to opt for 3 meals a day , and ideally, space them all within an 8-hour window. This latter part is a concept known as intermittent fasting, where you alternate periods of eating (8 hours on) with a period of non-eating (16 hours). While this is not required, it is optimal and highly beneficial. During the 8 hours, your goal is to eat 3 meals a day with no grazing in-between, with the focus of your more substantial meals taking place at br Continue reading >>

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

Grazing Vs Two Large Meals—which Is Better For Insulin Sensitivity?

New study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing Conventional dietary wisdom holds that eating frequent but small meals—“grazing”—helps to maintain steady blood glucose and promotes weight loss. New research from the Czech Republic calls that theory into question. The study suggests that eating two large meals per day improves insulin sensitivity and promotes weight loss better in patients with type 2 diabetes than grazing, even when the total number of daily calories is the same. “The data suggest that eating fewer, larger meals—a hearty breakfast and lunch—can be healthy and beneficial for people with type 2 diabetes,” said Hana Kahleova, MD, PhD, researcher at the Institute for Clinical and Experimental Medicine in Prague. “Our results support the ancient proverb, ‘Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.’” The randomized, crossover study included 54 adults with type 2 diabetes (average age, 59). Patients were assigned eating plans designed to cut their intake by 500 calories per day for 24 weeks. Participants had well-controlled diabetes, with an average A1c of 7.2%, but were overweight, with an average body mass index (BMI) of 32.6. Before beginning their new eating plans, the patients participated in group meetings and received individual counseling, noted Dr. Kahleova, who recently presented the study results at the American Diabetes Association’s 73rd Scientific Sessions in Chicago. For 12 weeks the participants ate 6 meals per day—breakfast, lunch, dinner, and three snacks. For the other 12 weeks they ate only a large breakfast between 6:00 and 10:00 a.m. and a large lunch between 12:00 and Continue reading >>

Snacking And Insulin

Snacking And Insulin

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can others share what they do? I am a type 1.5 female and have been for about 2 yrs. I am now on lantus twice a day (on advice from hospital as once a day didn't work for me) and novorapid and having done a carb counting course have a carb insulin ratio. It was also confirmed a few months ago by blood tests that at long last my pancreas had stopped which was good as suddenly I started to get some stability. Before, despite weighing everything my bgs were v unpredictable. However that stability hasn't lasted and once again I am all over the place. Slight adjustments suggested by the hospital with my long acting help for a few days then its back to being all over the place. I am very sensitive to any physical activity and underweight. I do eat healthily but not low carb as such as I cannot lose more weight and would prefer to adjust insulin to what I eat. I also have a stoma so that affects what I can eat as well. What I am really struggling with is snacking for pleasure and to help weight gain. Eg last night having done decorating during the day, I had my evening meal, underdosed my quick acting insulin by about .7 as usually the affect of physical activity on my bgs continues for a few hrs after and I wanted to have a few doritos as an evening snack. Yet my BG was 13 at bedtime and 19 this morning. It is really getting me down. I don't want to snack all the time nor am I wanting to eat rubbish but I do want to feel I don't just have to eat at meal times and also I get hungry and need to gain weight. The hospital are supportive but even they say I am complex. We have no idea how much my stoma, affects my digestion and bgs and whether this adds to the u Continue reading >>

'exercise Snacks' Before Meals: A Novel Strategy To Improve Glycaemic Control In Individuals With Insulin Resistance.

'exercise Snacks' Before Meals: A Novel Strategy To Improve Glycaemic Control In Individuals With Insulin Resistance.

'Exercise snacks' before meals: a novel strategy to improve glycaemic control in individuals with insulin resistance. School of Physical Education, Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Otago, 46 Union St West, PO Box 56, Dunedin, 9076, New Zealand. Diabetologia. 2014 Jul;57(7):1437-45. doi: 10.1007/s00125-014-3244-6. Epub 2014 May 10. AIMS/HYPOTHESIS: The aim of this study was to investigate whether small doses of intense exercise before each main meal ('exercise snacks') would result in better blood glucose control than a single bout of prolonged, continuous, moderate-intensity exercise in individuals with insulin resistance. METHODS: Nine individuals completed three exercise interventions in randomised order. Measures were recorded across 3 days with exercise performed on the middle day, as either: (1) traditional continuous exercise (CONT), comprising 30 min moderate-intensity (60% of maximal heart rate [HRmax]) incline walking before dinner; (2) exercise snacking (ES), consisting of 6 1 min intense (90% HRmax) incline walking intervals 30 min before each meal; or (3) composite exercise snacking (CES), encompassing 6 1 min intervals alternating between walking and resistance-based exercise, 30 min before meals. Meal timing and composition were controlled within participants for exercise interventions. RESULTS: ES attenuated mean 3 h postprandial glucose concentration following breakfast (by 1.4 1.5 mmol/l, p = 0.02) but not lunch (0.4 1.0 mmol/l, p = 0.22), and was more effective than CONT following dinner (0.7 1.5 mmol/l below CONT; p = 0.04). ES also reduced 24 h mean glucose concentration by 0.7 0.6 mmol/l (p = 0.01) and this reduction persisted for the subsequent 24 h (lower by 0.6 0.4 mmol/l vs CONT, relative to their baselines; p = 0.01). CES was just as Continue reading >>

Snacks And The Insulin Resistance Diet

Snacks And The Insulin Resistance Diet

Information Snacks and the Insulin Resistance Diet IRFoodie 09/01/2014 Information , Snacks Contrary to some beliefs and advice, my insulin resistance diet was to consist of three meals a day with no snacks in between. I had previously experimented with eating smaller portions every 2 hours as well as larger meals at breakfast, lunch and dinner but nothing worked to stop the creeping weight gain and out of control hunger pangs. My afternoon snacks included 1-2 slice of cheese or a few scoops of hommus with dry multigrain biscuits, a small sandwich or Vegemite on toast. Snacking on sweets or junk food (apart from the occasional packet of chips when I craved salt) didnt enter the equation. Korean Green Tea and Natural Almonds My specialist was strict about the three-meals-a-day diet. The aim is to regulate the bodys glucose levels and stop the cravings. But I knew that with my work-life situation, it would be impossible not to eat between 1.00pm and 7.30pm so he allowed me a small afternoon snack. The first suggestion was to eat 6 natural almonds. This nut is high in protein and good fats, and is known to curb appetite. Slowly, I was allowed to add a few thin/shaved slices of lean ham or 25g of cheese. The first few weeks were the most difficult. 6 almonds did not compare to hommus and crackers. I added miso soup (on the allowed list) to the afternoon snack, occasionally using only half a packet and it helped curb my appetite. These days I vary what I eat for my afternoon snack. Natural almonds still feature daily, and I pre-soak them in water for 24 hours in the fridge which makes them taste fresher. I alternate between thin shavings of lean ham, vintage cheddar cheese, miso soup, Korean green tea and homemade baba ghanouj dip which I eat about 3-4 teaspoons with no bre Continue reading >>

The Perils Of Snacking Hormonal Obesity Xiii

The Perils Of Snacking Hormonal Obesity Xiii

The Perils of Snacking Hormonal Obesity XIII 50 years ago, there was a near universal belief that snacking was bad for us. Your grandmother would say It makes you fat, or Youll ruin your dinner. Back then, obesity was not such a big problem, so maybe they knew something. But then we changed our minds. To review the previous post click here . Weve now decided that snacking is actually good for us. That eating more often will make us thinner, as ridiculous as that sounds. Im sure youve heard the advice to eat more frequent, smaller meals to lose weight. That would mean that we should eat 3 meals a day and also multiple snacks in between. Dieticians such as the well-respected Leslie Beck, who writes in Canadas national Globe and Mail newspaper feel that snacking is healthy for us. Inher August 28th, 2012 article she writes Snacks are an important part of every childs back to school menu. See? Not only should adults be eating all the time, kids should be, too. Too bad about that childhood obesityepidemic were having, though.. How did we come to make such a 180 degree turn on snacking? The answer is explored in depth by Jacques Perettis absolutely fascinating BBC series The Men who made us Fat . The answer, I suppose not surprisingly is that it was the big food companies (Big Food) that convinced us that snacking was good for us. Sometime starting in the 1950s the big food companies had a problem. They needed to sell more food to be more profitable. But with only 3 meals in a day, there was a limit on the amount of food sold. The deviously brilliant solution was to introduce new eating opportunities. If Big Food could convince us to add a snack between lunch and dinner then the opportunity to sell more food unfurls. A whole new category of food items to sell was created. It Continue reading >>

Snack Attack: 'grazing' Used To Be King, But Now Experts Say It Slows Metabolism, And Can Cause Tooth Decay And Diabetes

Snack Attack: 'grazing' Used To Be King, But Now Experts Say It Slows Metabolism, And Can Cause Tooth Decay And Diabetes

Snack attack: 'Grazing' used to be king, but now experts say it slows metabolism, and can cause tooth decay and diabetes For years, nutritionists have been telling us to graze - eat little and often - to keep up our energy levels and as a tactic to avoid overeating unhealthy food. The problem with grazing is that many people ignore the bit about eating only a little, hearing only the message to 'eat often' - the result is we've become a nation of snackers. Furthermore, we're snacking not on healthy foods, but on chocolate, crisps and other calorie-laden products. Between meals: Experts now believe that we should go back to three meals a day, and cut out the snacks in between. (Posed by model) Clearly, eating lots of junk food is not good for the waistline. But now, some experts believe that the very principle of eating between meals - whether it's healthy or junk food - is the real problem. They say snacking makes us even more hungry; it also interferes with the body's ability to burn fat, leads to obesity and type 2 diabetes, as well as tooth decay. What we should really be doing, it seems, is going back to three proper meals a day, with no snacks in between. 'For many, snacking is a major cause of weight gain,' says Professor Stephen Atkin, head of diabetes and metabolism at Hull York Medical School. Adds Naveed Sattar, professor of metabolic medicine at GlasgowUniversity: 'Snacking gives us extra calories and the fact is, extracalories make us fat.' But not only are snacks often highly calorific; eating all day also undermines our body's ability to burn off fat. If you must... Too many people are eating chocolate and crisps, where the perfect snack remains fruit and nuts When we eat, our body releases insulin - a hormone that helps carry sugar into the cells to burn Continue reading >>

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Therapeutic Diet For Insulin Resistance

Home Dr. Rachelle S. Bradley Solutions Counseling Naturopathic Medicine Homeopathy Self-care Nutrition Prevention & Healing Policies/Fees/Contact Links Events/Lectures Return to the Nutrition main page Therapeutic Diet for Insulin Resistance This moderate-carbohydrate, moderate-protein and moderate-fat diet is focused on real foods as the solution to Insulin Resistance Syndrome (IR), sometimes called Metabolic Syndrome, Syndrome X, or pre-diabetes. It is mainly refined foods, especially sweets and refined flour products, combined with deficient exercise that gets people into trouble. A program based on whole foods, not more refined food products, is the best long-term solution in IR, and a host of other health problems as well. It is also recommended to take a good multiple vitamin/mineral. Based on human evolutionary history and physiology this should be your most natural and optimal diet. It reflects what our Paleolithic ancestors (i.e., before agriculture) evolved eating over a million years and, as such, has the highest potential of supporting healing and preventing disease. In addition, this diet is naturally alkalizing, which is considered by some people to be healthier than the typical American acidifying diet. If you need more recipe support than this handout provides, a popular diet that is close to this IR diet is The South Beach Diet by Arthur Agatston, M.D. We also recommended reading The Paleo Diet by Loren Cordain, Ph.D. It gives a good background on the problems of the modern diet and the advantages of the Paleolithic diet. However, use this handout as your main reference and refer to these books only for background and recipes. It will take at least 2 to 3 months to reestablish normal insulin sensitivity. If there is severe IR or obesity it could take mu Continue reading >>

The New Rules Of Snacking

The New Rules Of Snacking

British women automatically associate snacking with feelings of guiltCredit:Peter Dazeley/Photographer's Choice If we werent before, we are now officially a nation of snackers . According to the largest-ever consumer survey into what we eat between meals for which some 11,000 people were quizzed, with the results to be revealed tomorrow in a Channel 4 documentary, Secrets of Our Favourite Snacks we are the largest snackers in Europe, eating four times more crisps than the French or Italians. The average Brit now eats crisps, nuts or popcorn seven times a week. In the last two years alone, snacking on nuts has risen by almost 25 per cent, with the fastest growth area among men over the age of 45. When it comes to women between the ages of 25 and 44, snacking on popcorn is up 45.7 per cent from 2014. If that was enough food for thought, another survey this time by YouGov has revealed that more than half of British women (54 per cent) now snack twice a day, but that four-fifths (84 per cent) instantly feel guilty about doing it. Brits are a nation of grazers: can we learn to do it better?Credit:Peter Dazeley/Photographer's Choice No wonder we are known as generation graze. Yet hunger used to be an ordinary part of the day; so many of us grew up with three meals a day, and nothing in between. How did we get to this point of needing to be permanently sated and is it good for us? In todays society, theres so much pressure to look good and eat right, says Harley Street GP Dr Pixie McKenna , known for her role presenting Channel 4s Bafta-winning medical series Embarrassing Bodies, among other shows. But in reality, leading such busy lives means snacking is inevitable. Its important to fuel our bodies, especially if were hungry, Dr McKenna adds: I have never been a regular snac Continue reading >>

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