diabetestalk.net

Smart Insulin Patch 2018

Could A Smart Insulin Patch Mean No More Diabetic Injections?

Could A Smart Insulin Patch Mean No More Diabetic Injections?

Could a smart insulin patch mean no more diabetic injections? A smart insulin patch could replace painful injections to help millions of people with diabetes keep their blood sugar levels in check, the Daily Mirror reports; though the technology has only been tested on mice. Insulin is a hormone that plays a vital role in regulating blood glucose levels. People with type 1 diabetes , as well as advanced type 2 diabetes , require regular insulin injections, as their body either doesnt produce enough insulin or reacts to it in the wrong way. Researchers have developed a new type of glucose-sensing patch, which is worn on the skin and delivers insulin in response to sensing high levels of glucose. The study showed that the patch was capable of reducing blood glucose levels to normal in mice with chemically induced diabetes over about four hours. This research is at an early stage, so we therefore dont know if it will be both safe and effective in humans. Before any human testing can occur, researchers will need to study the longer-term effects on animals. Researchers will also need to work out whether they can deliver enough insulin to regulate blood glucose levels in humans, and how often the patches need to be changed. All in all, we wouldnt expect to see these patches at your local chemist in the near future. The study was carried out by researchers from the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State University. It was funded by the American Diabetes Association, and the North Carolina Translational and Clinical Sciences Institute, which is supported by the National Institutes of Health. The study was published in the peer-reviewed scientific journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS). The UK medias reporting of the study was patchy. The Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections for Diabetes Insulin-filled nanoparticles may be game changer, expert says Insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans with diabetes, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State, who have created a smart insulin patch that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch a thin square no larger than a penny is covered with more than 100 microneedles, each about the size of an eyelash. These tiny needles are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes, which rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type-1 diabetes for up to 9 hours. More preclinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients. We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials, said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD. The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetics weight and sensitivity to insulin, so we could make the smart patch even smarter. Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 million by the year 2035. Patients with type-1 and advanced type-2 diabetes try to keep their blood sugar levels under control with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. Co-senior author John Buse, MD, PhD, said, Injecting the wrong amount of medication can lead to significant compli Continue reading >>

'smart Cell Patch' To Control Diabetes On Its Own - Skyline University College | Best And Top University In Uae

'smart Cell Patch' To Control Diabetes On Its Own - Skyline University College | Best And Top University In Uae

New York, March 15 (IANS)Researchers have created a synthetic painless patch filled with natural beta cells that can secrete doses of insulin to control blood sugar levels on demand. The patch could provide relief to millions of people with Type-1 and advanced Type-2 diabetes who need to monitor insulin levels constantly. While insulin injections provide painful and often imperfect substitutes, transplants of normal beta cells carry the risk of rejection or side effects from immunosuppressive therapies.The proof-of-concept builds on an innovative technology, the "smart insulin patch," reported last year in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. Both patches are thin polymeric squares about the size of a quarter and covered in tiny needles, like a miniature bed of nails. But whereas the former approach filled these needles with humanmade bubbles of insulin, this new "smart cell patch" integrates the needles with live beta cells.Tests of this painless patch in animal models of Type-1 diabetes demonstrated that it could quickly respond to skyrocketing blood sugar levels and significantly lower them for 10 hours at a time. The results were published in the journal Advanced Materials. "This study provides a potential solution for the tough problem of rejection, which has long plagued studies on pancreatic cell transplants for diabetes," said senior author Zhen Gu, assistant professor in the joint University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University department of biomedical engineering."Plus it demonstrates that we can build a bridge between the physiological signals within the body and these therapeutic cells outside the body to keep glucose levels under control," Gu noted. Beta cells typically reside in the pancreas, where t Continue reading >>

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

"Smart Insulin Patch" for Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials A "smart insulin patch" that could potentially dispel the need for painful insulin injections for millions of people worldwide with diabetes has been developed by a team at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and North Carolina State University. It employs painless microneedles to sense the low oxygen environment created when glucose levels rise and then delivers insulin as required. This is the first approach adopting this strategy of sensing low oxygen levels; other similar nanoparticle technologies in development rely instead on detecting changes in pH. However, the patch has so far only been tested in murine models of type 1 diabetes; a study detailing the findings in mice was published online on June 22, 2015 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "We are now moving toward preclinical, minipig-based studies before moving to clinical trials," said senior author Dr Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the joint UNC/NC State department of biomedical engineering. "If successful, we will test the patch on humans. It would take several years, most likely around 3 to 4 years, until potential clinical trials." "If we can get these patches to work in people, it will be a game changer," said John Buse, MD, PhD, another author, in a press release. Dr Buse is director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center and past president of the American Diabetes Association. Asked to comment, Richard Elliott, MD, research communications manager at Diabetes UK, said: "Alongside the insulin pumps that are already widely available, this 'smart patch' is one of a number of experimental approaches that are hoping to eliminate, or at least reduce, the need for insulin injections to manage diabetes effectively." But "significant Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

The Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State University was founded in 2003 to bring engineers and medical researchers together to solve pressing healthcare issues. Gu, an associate professor in the department, has been working with his colleagues to remedy the imperfections of current insulin delivery methods. In the healthy body, insulin secretion always quickly follows the blood sugar levels, says Gu. We want to mimic this process in a scientific way ourselves. Their solution is a glucose-responsive smart insulin patch that is worn on the skin and instantaneously releases insulin as needed. Roughly the same size as a dime, the patch contains 121 microneedles, each thinner than a human hair and pre-loaded with tiny packets of insulin and glucose oxidase, an enzyme that immediately responds to high glucose levels and sparks a reaction that releases insulin. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need this patch. But no one is perfect. Susan Spratt, associate professor of medicine at Duke University The on-demand actions of the insulin patches could help people with diabetes worry less about their glucose levels regardless of their activity levels and food intake while also increasing the accuracy of insulin dosing. Not only would the patch prevent high blood glucose, it also would reduce the chance of taking too much insulin, which can result in dangerously low blood glucose levels. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need th Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 919-923-0959, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight and sensitivity to insulin,” he added, “so we could make the smart patch even smarter.” Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 mill Continue reading >>

Diabetes Breakthrough? New Skin Patch Could End Misery Of Daily Insulin Injections

Diabetes Breakthrough? New Skin Patch Could End Misery Of Daily Insulin Injections

Scientists have created the special patch which stimulates the body’s own insulin production - and is completely pain-free. The new device could revolutionise treatment of the condition, which affects around four million people in the UK. Researchers say the game-changing invention delivers a natural substance extracted from brown algae - completely removing the need for painful and unpleasant daily injections. They claim the pain-free weekly ‘smart’ patch only releases the active ingredients when needed. It stimulates the body’s own insulin production and control blood sugar levels. The biochemically formulated treatment does this by delivering a natural substance, which is extracted from brown algae and mixed with therapeutic agents, through dissolvable microneedles which penetrate the skin. Dr Richard Leapman, scientific director of the National Institute of Biomedical Imaging and Bioengineering (NIBIB) in Maryland, US, where the patch has been developed, said: “This experimental approach could be a way to take advantage of the fact that persons with type 2 diabetes can still produce some insulin. “A weekly microneedle patch application would also be less complicated and painful than routines that require frequent blood testing.” About four million people in the UK now have diabetes, with 90 per cent suffering from Type 2. Type 1 is an auto-immune disease which cannot currently be cured. Type 2 can be avoided by making lifestyle changes such as taking more exercise and eating a healthy diet. An estimated 549,000 people have it but are unaware. The condition is a major cause of blindness, kidney failure, heart attacks, stroke and lower limb amputation. Wed, June 21, 2017 Living with diabetes - ten top tips to live normally with the condition. And experts Continue reading >>

Unc/n.c. State Spinout Company Raises $5.8m For 'smart' Insulin Devices

Unc/n.c. State Spinout Company Raises $5.8m For 'smart' Insulin Devices

UNC/N.C. State spinout company raises $5.8M for 'smart' insulin devices A Research Triangle Park startup founded by a biomedical engineer with joint faculty appointments at UNC and N.C. State University recently received a $5.8 million cash infusion to continue translation efforts of 'smart' insulin devices Credit: UNC/ NCSU Joint Biomedical Engineering Program. CHAPEL HILL, NC - Technology invented in a laboratory in the UNC-NC State Joint Biomedical Engineering Program could soon mean painless diabetes testing and insulin injections for the nearly 400 million people with diabetes worldwide. Zenomics, Inc., a Research Triangle Park (RTP) startup co-founded by Zhen Gu, PhD, a scientist in the UNC-NC State Joint Biomedical Engineering Program, recently raised $5.8 million in investment fundraising. The money raised was from MicroPort Scientific Corporation, a biomedical device company that promotes the translation of Gu's patented smart insulin technology. The microneedles -- hundreds of which fit onto the coin-sized patch or other smart device platform -- feature microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing components, Gu explained. When blood sugar levels get too high, the microneedles automatically release insulin, combining the testing with the insulin injection in a a pain-free and perfectly timed manner that requires little to no effort by the person wearing the device. "If this translates successfully, this technology will enhance the health of patients with diabetes and improve their lives," Gu said. "The technology is painless and it also lessens human error, so that you receive a more accurate blood-sugar controlling." With this round of investment funding, Zenomics, Inc., which Gu co-founded in September 2015, will continue furthering this techno Continue reading >>

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

Categories: Diabetes Care Diabetes Research Besides using a glucometer or one of the new technologies proposed in the past for checking blood glucose levels, the newly developed smart insulin patch may be the perfect solution to replace pricking altogether. Although Lucas Research is not participating in this study, this new method of monitoring through a self-adhesive patch is close to release. The Innovative Smart Insulin Patch- Development The UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State Biomedical Engineering Program has jointly began development of a new diabetes monitoring solution. The university has created smart insulin patches. Zhen Gu leads this team of engineers and has founded a company in Research Triangle Park. The company is called Zenomics Inc. Thanks to Chinas MicroPort Scientific contribution of $5.8 million new diabetes research and testing is happening. The patch replaces inconvenient, uncomfortable injections and pumps. Current insulin delivery methods are not ideal. Right now, they pose painful and time-consuming scheduling. The smart patch will enhance the health and quality of life for people living with diabetes. The proposed patch will be responsive to insulin levels. Diabetics will wear the dime sized smart insulin patch on their skin. Wear the patch on any part of the body. You can easily hide it under clothing. Throughout the day, the patch monitors blood sugar levels. The patch will release insulin as needed. Read the levels through the 121 microneedles in each patch. The microneedles are not painful. Thinner than a human hair, each one has packets of insulin preloaded in them. Not only does each microneedle contain insulin, it also includes glucose oxidase. Thats an enzyme that treats high glucose levels. It will sense when levels are too high and imm Continue reading >>

Mucroneedle Patch Could Replace Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics.

Mucroneedle Patch Could Replace Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics.

January 23, 2017 On January 4th an article entitled, H2O2-Responsive Vesicles Integrated with Transcutaneous Patches for Glucose-Mediated Insulin Delivery appeared in ACSNano, a journal published by the American Chemical Society. What is described is a self-regulated smart insulin administration system that replaces the daily routine of diabetics, the needle prick, the blood glucose readout, and administration of insulin injections. The patch is described as a transcutaneous microneedle-array which provides painless administration of insulin based on a continuous read of blood sugar levels . When the patchs sensors note a rise in blood sugar, the microneedles containing insulin release the right amount of the hormone through the skin. Compared to conventional treatment of the two types of diabetes, Type-1 (people who dont make insulin) and Type-2 (people who cant use insulin effectively), the wearer never experiences insulin highs or lows caused by spiking blood sugar levels. Insulin pumps already exist and researchers have been experimenting with transcutaneous patches for administering drugs. The insulin pumps, however, have been designed to provide a continuous delivery of the hormone without the ability to monitor blood sugar levels. With a micro-needle smart patch the glucose sensing ability means insulin is only delivered when the body needs it. Developed using diabetic mice models, the microneedles, made from a polymer containing glucose oxidase, react in the presence of detected glucose. This is the trigger that causes them to biodegrade and upon disintegration releases the insulin. This research is a multi-institute and multi-country achievement, with collaboration done by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill , North Carolina State University , and Changc Continue reading >>

Updated Smart Insulin Patch Uses Live Beta Cells To Produce Insulin

Updated Smart Insulin Patch Uses Live Beta Cells To Produce Insulin

Updated "Smart Insulin Patch" Uses Live Beta Cells To Produce Insulin A scanning electron microscopic (SEM) image of the microneedle-array patch developed in the lab of Zhen Gu, PhD. Image courtesy of UNC Health Care / UNC School of Medicine Researchers from the University of North Carolina (UNC) and North Carolina State (NCS) continue to develop a smart insulin patch that uses microneedles to detect rising levels of glucose in the bloodstream and then provides a dose of insulin if required. Previous patches were preloaded with synthetic insulin, but an update to the technology uses live beta cells instead, which researchers say reduces the risk of complication and lasts longer than the previous prototype. The biocompatible patch, introduced in a study published by Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences (PNAS) last year, is roughly the size of a quarter and is embedded with microneedles the width of a human hair. Each of the needles is loaded with glucose-sensing enzymes and insulin, and if the enzymes sense a drop in the bloods glucose, the insulin is released into the blood stream. The patchs proof-of-concept study, using mouse models, found that it could regulate glucose levels for up to 9 hours, said the researchers in a press release . According to Zhen Gu, a professor in the joint UNC/NCS department of bioengineering and co-senior author of the study, the system works quickly to correct glucose imbalances, is relatively simple to use, and is less painful than daily injections. John Buse, director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center, added that the patches can be customized to suit each patients individual needs. The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetics weight and sensitivity to insulin, said Buse, so we could make the smart patch even Continue reading >>

Practical Cure Projects In Fda Human Trials By Pathway Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance

Practical Cure Projects In Fda Human Trials By Pathway Juvenile Diabetes Cure Alliance

Practical Cure Projects in FDA Human Trials by Pathway This report reviews the 11 active Practical Cure (PC) research projects underway in FDA approved human clinical trials. A summary of these projects is presented in the charts below by pathway and includes the project title, description, location, and status. A full definition of a Practical Cure, as well as the four research pathways, can be found in last weeks report,The Four Research Pathways to a Practical Cure for Type 1 Diabetes ( Click here to view) . Each of the four PC research pathways represents a different approach to the same endpoint; minimizing the disruptive aspects of T1D. Trials within the same pathway are pursuing comparable research strategies. The main takeaway is that no new Practical Cure projects have been added in 2017 and one project from 2016 has been abandoned. Beyond the 11 active projects, there is also an appendix at the end of the report which outlines high-profile emerging Practical Cure projects. These projects are 'emerging' because they are not currently testing in human trials but are moving quickly in that direction. Our coverage of emerging projects is limited to well known, high profile projects such as research being done at the DRI Biohub and Semma Therapeutics. Cell Transplant with Autoimmune Protection Definition:implanting islet cells, stem cells, or precursor cells to achieve insulin independence. Cells are protected by an encapsulation device or immune system modification. Commentary: Over the past decade, there have been significant advances in islet, stem, and precursor cell development and production. The remaining hurdle involves the development of an encapsulation device or immune system modification requirement that is sustainable long term. There are four active Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon – New Insulin Delivery Systems Coming In 2018

Diabetes Tech On The Horizon – New Insulin Delivery Systems Coming In 2018

By Maeve Serino and Adam Brown Learn about what’s new and what’s coming soon in Smart Pens, automated insulin delivery, pumps, and more Diabetes technology moves fast, so to help you keep track, we’ve rounded up some of the latest offerings – and options coming soon – for insulin delivery. (You can read diaTribe’s updates about the latest diabetes apps and software here, and CGM here.) Below, you’ll find products that have recently become available or are expected to launch in the next year or so based on the most recent timing updates we’ve heard. This article is not entirely comprehensive – and timelines often change – but this list covers many of the most notable products in insulin delivery, including smart pens, automated insulin delivery, improved pump technologies, and more. A more detailed description of each product follows the table of contents below. Click to jump to a product, which are organized chronologically by their expected launch date within each category: New Insulin Delivery Devices Medtronic MiniMed 670G Hybrid Closed Loop – currently available in the US (over 20,000 users), though a sensor shortage has slowed new shipments. International launch expected by April 2018 Tandem t:slim X2 with Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) – expected US launch in summer 2018 Insulet Omnipod Dash touchscreen personal diabetes manager – limited US market release expected in mid-2018 Medtronic MiniMed Pro Infusion Set with BD FlowSmart technology – relaunch expected by September 2018 BD Patch Pump for type 2 diabetes and smart pen needles – possible launches as early as October 2018 and as late as September 2019 Companion Medical InPen (smart pen + smartphone app) Now available in the US What’s New? Companion Medical’s Bluetooth-e Continue reading >>

Insulin-releasing ‘smart Cells’ Could Inspire New Diabetes Treatment

Insulin-releasing ‘smart Cells’ Could Inspire New Diabetes Treatment

Patients with Type 1 diabetes know the routine all too well: the frequent skin pricks to test their blood, the need for insulin injections or a mechanical pump to prevent dangerous spikes or drops in blood sugar. Scientists at University of North Carolina and NC State are developing what they hope will be a less painful, more convenient alternative: “smart” artificial beta cells that can detect the need for insulin and secrete it automatically. In Type 1 diabetes and some cases of the Type 2 form of the disease, the loss or malfunctioning of beta cells in the pancreas that secrete insulin is the culprit. So the researchers made versions of the cells that can be inserted under the skin and replaced every few days. In mouse models of diabetes, a single injection of the cells normalized blood sugar and kept levels steady for up to five days, they reported in the journal Nature Chemical Biology. The cells are modeled after real beta cells in that they have membranes made of two levels of lipids. The research team then added special vesicles to the cells that contain insulin and that have a coating that changes chemically when blood sugar rises. That change prompts the cells to release insulin. RELATED: Insights into fat signaling could boost the fight against obesity and diabetes The biotech industry has invested hundreds of millions of dollars into developing alternatives to frequent finger pricks and insulin injections—with limited success. MannKind launched its inhaled insulin product, Afrezza, in 2015, but sales were so disappointing that the company’s marketing partner, Sanofi, pulled out in 2016. Medical device makers have had considerably more success developing products to simplify diabetes care. In June, for example, Medtronic won FDA approval for the MiniM Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

New Diabetes Technology To Expect In 2018

We're sorry, an error occurred. We are unable to collect your feedback at this time. However, your feedback is important to us. Please try again later. The start of a new year always brings curiosity about what's on tap in new diabetes technology, and we're excited to take an inside look, especially with the big JP Morgan Healthcare and Consumer Electronics Show events underway this month. Of course, these days Amazon and Google generate quite the medtech buzz, not to mention wearable smartwatches and Apple talk and the very many mobile health apps being developed . Some of the recent buzz includes FitBit investing $6M to develop a continuous glucose sensor, and rumors that Apple's developing its own super-secret continuous monitor built directly into its Apple Watch. On the flip side, you can't talk about innovation or D-tech these days without the lockstep concerns of access and affordability. It's encouraging to see reimbursement being more of a focus at the R&D stage of new products, and the latest news of Medicare coverage for the tubeless OmniPod pump and new Abbott FreeStyle Libre flash glucose monitor are big moves forward. We've reached out to many leading diabetes vendors and combed through public reports from investor earnings calls and other news announcements to compile this (not exhaustive) look at what's ahead in D-tech for this coming year. You might refer to this as Artificial Pancreas systems , but whatever the name it's about "closing the loop" in glucose-monitoring and insulin dosing. While we won't see any fully closed loops (requiring no user intervention) on the market during 2018, we'll certainly see progress from numerous players. Beta Bionics: This B-Corp startup in Boston now has its fourth-generation prototype of its iLet4 system, a dual-hor Continue reading >>

More in insulin