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Smart Insulin Patch 2017

New Insulin Delivery 'smart' Patch Shows Promise In Mouse Study

New Insulin Delivery 'smart' Patch Shows Promise In Mouse Study

New insulin delivery 'smart' patch shows promise in mouse study Scientists test smart patch to monitor blood glucose and automatically deliver insulin in type 1 diabetes patients. By Amy Wallace|Jan. 18, 2017 at 11:56 AM Jan. 18 (UPI) -- Researchers from the United States and China have developed a new smart patch that can monitor blood glucose and automatically deliver insulin painlessly to patients with type 1 diabetes. The smart patch has been shown in tests to be successful at lowering blood glucose in mice. The smart skin patch consists of painless microneedles that contain tiny insulin-carrying pouches, which are designed to break apart quickly and automatically release insulin when blood glucose levels get too high. Researchers tested the smart patch on mice with diabetes and found that the mice were able to maintain consistent concentrations of insulin in their blood. When researchers gave the mice a shot of glucose, blood sugar initially spiked but then dropped to normal levels within two hours. The patch could allow people with type 1 diabetes, who do not make any insulin and are dependent on daily insulin injections and blood sugar monitoring, to have a better quality of life. Patients with advanced type 2 diabetes could also benefit from the technology. Continue reading >>

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

6 New Diabetes Products To Look For In 2017

If we learned anything about diabetes products in 2016, it’s that progress can happen faster than we anticipate. The diabetes community was stunned in September when the FDA announced that it had approved Medtronic Diabetes’ MiniMed 670G system, the world’s first pump/sensor system to be able to dose insulin on its own. (Advocacy works!) One of the most exciting things about the approval of Medtronic’s 670G is not only access to the groundbreaking device itself, but the path it paves for similar products – by many companies – to win approval as well. (We’re keeping an eye on Bigfoot Biomedical, Inc, the company that back in July of this year enrolled its first patients in a clinical trial for the Bigfoot smartloop automated insulin delivery system.) Now, as this year comes to a close, we’re listening to the buzz that continues to build around the new diabetes technology coming our way in 2017. The new year will bring a slate of highly anticipated products, including milestone devices like the OneTouch Via (a bolus-only delivery patch) and the above-mentioned Medtronic MiniMed 670G system (widely regarded as a rudimentary artificial pancreas). We’ve rounded up descriptions of some of the most exciting diabetes products expected to hit the market in 2017, followed by an approximate timeframe of when they’ll become available to the public. Sure, what we really want is a cure in 2017, but we’ll take improved quality of life, thanks to new devices and tech, with tremendous gratitude. Animas G5 Integrated Vibe Insulin Pump and CGM System What it is: This pump integrates Dexcom G5 technology with the Animas Vibe system. It’s especially exciting because it’s the only pump of its kind that is available to patients with type one diabetes as young as 2 ye Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin

Smart Insulin

Glucose responsive insulin (GRI), known as 'smart' insulin, is a promising treatment option Glucose responsive insulin (GRI), known as 'smart' insulin, is a promising treatment option for people with diabetes that, if successful, could result in blood glucose levels remaining within range during the day, and no more worrying about low or high blood sugar. Scientists worldwide are working on administering smart insulin in different forms, such as capsules and patches. But the research is in its infancy - in many cases, human testing of smart insulin is not scheduled for several years. GRI works in the body by automatically reacting to blood sugar fluctuations, essentially the same as normal insulin-producing cells in people without diabetes. GRI would therefore take the hassle out of consistently managing blood sugar levels and also enable tighter blood glucose control. If smart insulin ultimately proves successful, it could be revolutionary for treating diabetes. Smart insulin is a next-generation insulin that automatically responds to changing blood glucose levels. The lower or higher blood sugar levels are, less or more insulin is released, respectively. The insulin, whether taken as an injection or pill, keeps blood glucose levels normal throughout the day. This eliminates not just hypoglycemia and hyperglycemia but also multiple daily injections and carb counting. All smart insulin projects are at a very early stage and, in some cases, the drug is still being tested in animal studies. One of the earliest smart insulin projects began back in 2003 when Todd Zion, an MIT researcher, founded a company called SmartCells Inc, which soon gained backing from JDRF as it sought to develop GRI. In 2011 US pharmaceutical company Merck acquired SmartCells. Their MK-2640 insulin Continue reading >>

Pathway To Stop Diabetes Scientist Generates Smart Insulin Patch

Pathway To Stop Diabetes Scientist Generates Smart Insulin Patch

Pathway to Stop Diabetes Scientist Generates Smart Insulin Patch Currently, people with type 1 diabetes and advanced type 2 diabetes rely on painful finger pricks and regular insulin shots often multiple times a day to manage their blood glucose levels. While such approaches have been essential to improving diabetes care over the last half-century, they are burdensome and less than ideal. They allow people to correct for high blood glucose after it occurs, but not to avoid experiencing high blood glucose levels altogether. Significant advances in diabetes research over several decades have led to the development of continuous glucose monitors and wearable insulin pumps. Linking such technologies together through computer algorithms, creating a so-called "artificial" or "bionic" pancreas that automatically monitors and corrects high blood glucose has been the focus of substantial efforts to improve diabetes care. Along these same lines, American Diabetes Association Pathway to Stop Diabetes Scientist Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint University of North Carolina/North Carolina State University Department of Biomedical Engineering, recently published a paper describing the development of an innovative "smart insulin" patch that takes a slightly different approach to the artificial pancreas, imitating the body's beta cells by both sensing blood glucose levels and releasing insulin using a nanotechnology that leverages bioengineering, biochemistry and materials science. The study, published in the prestigious biomedical journal, Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, was highlighted in several national news outlets, including a Washington Post article published on June 22. Dr. Gu's research is supported by a $1.625 million grant from the American Diabetes As Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections for Diabetes Insulin-filled nanoparticles may be game changer, expert says Insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans with diabetes, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State, who have created a smart insulin patch that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch a thin square no larger than a penny is covered with more than 100 microneedles, each about the size of an eyelash. These tiny needles are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes, which rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type-1 diabetes for up to 9 hours. More preclinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients. We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials, said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD. The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetics weight and sensitivity to insulin, so we could make the smart patch even smarter. Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 million by the year 2035. Patients with type-1 and advanced type-2 diabetes try to keep their blood sugar levels under control with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. Co-senior author John Buse, MD, PhD, said, Injecting the wrong amount of medication can lead to significant compli Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tech 'spectations For 2017

Diabetes Tech 'spectations For 2017

It's a New Year's tradition here at the 'Mine to look ahead at the new technology and tools we expect to see coming down the pike in the year ahead. Even before the calendar rolled over, we knew 2017 would be a big year -- with the market launch this Spring of the first-ever hybrid closed loop system from Medtronic. This ushers in a new era of Artificial Pancreas tech, and that's just one of the exciting developments we can expect this year. We've been listening to earnings calls and talking with company execs, industry insiders and PR teams to get a sense of what else is on the horizon, compiled in the following report. (In case you're curious about our previous predictions, you can have a look back at our reports for 2016, 2015, and 2014.) Artificial Pancreas Systems Medtronic's Minimed 670G: Approved by the FDA in September 2016, this will be a first-of-its-kind system that can adjust insulin delivery accord to CGM values to keep users as close as possible to a set target of 120 mg/dL. The device itself will have a vertical design format with color screen. While it unfortunately doesn't accommodate data-sharing (!), the Minimed 670G uses the new Guardian 3 CGM sensor that MedT claims has improved accuracy and reliability. The system is set up to communicate directly with the Bayer Contour Link 2.4 fingerstick meter that Ascensia introduced in 2016, allowing for remote bolusing from the meter. Read our full coverage for more details on the 670G. In terms of launch date, so far Medtronic has only said "early 2017." Tandem's First-Gen Automated Insulin Delivery (AID): Makers of the t:slim insulin pump have plans to get their own first-generation closed loop system to market by end of 2017. This one will feature the Predictive Low Glucose Suspend (PLGS) that in many ways Continue reading >>

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

New Development: Smart Insulin Patch

Categories: Diabetes Care Diabetes Research Besides using a glucometer or one of the new technologies proposed in the past for checking blood glucose levels, the newly developed smart insulin patch may be the perfect solution to replace pricking altogether. Although Lucas Research is not participating in this study, this new method of monitoring through a self-adhesive patch is close to release. The Innovative Smart Insulin Patch- Development The UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State Biomedical Engineering Program has jointly began development of a new diabetes monitoring solution. The university has created smart insulin patches. Zhen Gu leads this team of engineers and has founded a company in Research Triangle Park. The company is called Zenomics Inc. Thanks to Chinas MicroPort Scientific contribution of $5.8 million new diabetes research and testing is happening. The patch replaces inconvenient, uncomfortable injections and pumps. Current insulin delivery methods are not ideal. Right now, they pose painful and time-consuming scheduling. The smart patch will enhance the health and quality of life for people living with diabetes. The proposed patch will be responsive to insulin levels. Diabetics will wear the dime sized smart insulin patch on their skin. Wear the patch on any part of the body. You can easily hide it under clothing. Throughout the day, the patch monitors blood sugar levels. The patch will release insulin as needed. Read the levels through the 121 microneedles in each patch. The microneedles are not painful. Thinner than a human hair, each one has packets of insulin preloaded in them. Not only does each microneedle contain insulin, it also includes glucose oxidase. Thats an enzyme that treats high glucose levels. It will sense when levels are too high and imm Continue reading >>

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Insulin Delivery Devices

New Diabetes Products For 2017: Insulin Delivery Devices

For the last year, Diabetes Self-Management has been following all the new innovations and products aimed at helping to improve the lives of those living with diabetes. From the latest glucometers and monitoring systems to insulin pumps, pens, and treatments, several major advancements made their impact on the diabetes community in 2016. When selecting some of the new products, we first talked to Gary Scheiner, MS, CDE, clinical director of Integrated Diabetes Services of Wynnewood, Pennsylvania. Scheiner, known as the MacGyver of diabetes products, has lived with Type 1 diabetes for more than 30 years. He tries out new products before recommending them to patients. “It’s important to see new products from the user’s point of view, not just from the [health-care practitioner’s] side of things,” said Scheiner. In 2016, the pace of innovation continued to race ahead with unbelievable technology right out of a Star Trek episode. The growing use of smartphone technology and mobile applications has led to better access to blood glucose readings, general health information, and much more. Read on to learn about the newest products. We guarantee you there’s something here for everyone, whether you live with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes. In this installment, we look at insulin delivery devices that have recently hit the market. Insulin pumps, pens, and patches Joining its family of insulin pumps, Tandem Diabetes Care introduced the t:slim X2 Insulin Pump — similar to the t:slim — late last year. The new pump features an advanced two-way Bluetooth radio and uses technology to update software remotely, much like a mobile phone. The pump is compatible with the Tandem Device Updater, a new tool that allows users to update the software from a personal computer. The pump Continue reading >>

Skin Patch Automatically Releases Insulin To Control Blood Sugar

Skin Patch Automatically Releases Insulin To Control Blood Sugar

Skin Patch Automatically Releases Insulin to Control Blood Sugar A collaboration between scientists atUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, North Carolina State University, andChangchun Institute of Applied Chemistry at theChinese Academy of Sciences has developed a novel skin patch that delivers insulin in response to high levels of measured glucose. The technology, if proven to work successfully in humans, may have a transformative effect on diabetes management. The patch has a bunch of microneedles that are sensitive to glucose, breaking up when a high concentration of the sugar is detected. The needles are hollow and each contains a small dose of insulin that is released when the needles degrade. The needles are made from a peroxide-reacting polymer that is loaded with glucose oxidase. When the glucose oxidase reacts with glucose, H2O2 is produced and the needles disintegrate and release their cargo of insulin. The patch was trialed on lab mice who underwent spikes in glucose levels. The patch successfully controlled those and reduced the blood glucose levels to normal within two hours of a glucose spike. At Medgadget, we report on the latest medical technology news, interview leaders in the field, and file dispatches from medical events from around the world. 27marallday29alldayTELEMED Leadership Forum, 2018Washington, DC The Telemed Leadership Forum 2018: ROI of Telehealth, March 27-29 in Washington DC, is a 2-1/2 day event that brings together some of the best and brightest healthcare experts in The Telemed Leadership Forum 2018: ROI of Telehealth, March 27-29 in Washington DC, is a 2-1/2 day event that brings together some of the best and brightest healthcare experts in the country to deliver solid, innovative and valuable information on the business of Continue reading >>

Toward A 'smart' Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward A 'smart' Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed January 18, 2017, American Chemical Society Tiny, painless microneedles on a patch can deliver insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Credit: American Chemical Society Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless "smart" patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The report on the device, which has been tested on mice, appears in the journal ACS Nano. People with Type 1 diabetes don't make insulina hormone that regulates blood glucose , or sugar. Those with Type 2 diabetes can't use insulin effectively. Either way, glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputation of toes, feet or legs. To avoid these outcomes, people with Type 1 or advanced Type 2 diabetes regularly prick their fingers to measure blood-sugar levels, and some patients must inject themselves with insulin when needed. But sometimes, despite a person's vigilance, glucose levels can still get out of whack. Zhen Gu and colleagues wanted to come up with a simpler, more effective, shot-free way to manage diabetes. The researchers developed a skin patch covered in painless microneedles that are loaded with tiny insulin-carrying pouches. The pouches are engineered to break apart rapidly and release the insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Diabetic mice wearing the patch maintained consistent concentrations of insulin in their blood. When these mice received a shot of glucose, their blood sugar levels spiked initially, but then fell to normal levels within two hours. More information: Xiuli Continue reading >>

Mucroneedle Patch Could Replace Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics.

Mucroneedle Patch Could Replace Glucose Monitoring For Diabetics.

January 23, 2017 On January 4th an article entitled, H2O2-Responsive Vesicles Integrated with Transcutaneous Patches for Glucose-Mediated Insulin Delivery appeared in ACSNano, a journal published by the American Chemical Society. What is described is a self-regulated smart insulin administration system that replaces the daily routine of diabetics, the needle prick, the blood glucose readout, and administration of insulin injections. The patch is described as a transcutaneous microneedle-array which provides painless administration of insulin based on a continuous read of blood sugar levels . When the patchs sensors note a rise in blood sugar, the microneedles containing insulin release the right amount of the hormone through the skin. Compared to conventional treatment of the two types of diabetes, Type-1 (people who dont make insulin) and Type-2 (people who cant use insulin effectively), the wearer never experiences insulin highs or lows caused by spiking blood sugar levels. Insulin pumps already exist and researchers have been experimenting with transcutaneous patches for administering drugs. The insulin pumps, however, have been designed to provide a continuous delivery of the hormone without the ability to monitor blood sugar levels. With a micro-needle smart patch the glucose sensing ability means insulin is only delivered when the body needs it. Developed using diabetic mice models, the microneedles, made from a polymer containing glucose oxidase, react in the presence of detected glucose. This is the trigger that causes them to biodegrade and upon disintegration releases the insulin. This research is a multi-institute and multi-country achievement, with collaboration done by University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill , North Carolina State University , and Changc Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

The Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State University was founded in 2003 to bring engineers and medical researchers together to solve pressing healthcare issues. Gu, an associate professor in the department, has been working with his colleagues to remedy the imperfections of current insulin delivery methods. In the healthy body, insulin secretion always quickly follows the blood sugar levels, says Gu. We want to mimic this process in a scientific way ourselves. Their solution is a glucose-responsive smart insulin patch that is worn on the skin and instantaneously releases insulin as needed. Roughly the same size as a dime, the patch contains 121 microneedles, each thinner than a human hair and pre-loaded with tiny packets of insulin and glucose oxidase, an enzyme that immediately responds to high glucose levels and sparks a reaction that releases insulin. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need this patch. But no one is perfect. Susan Spratt, associate professor of medicine at Duke University The on-demand actions of the insulin patches could help people with diabetes worry less about their glucose levels regardless of their activity levels and food intake while also increasing the accuracy of insulin dosing. Not only would the patch prevent high blood glucose, it also would reduce the chance of taking too much insulin, which can result in dangerously low blood glucose levels. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need th Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patches Or Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery Systems

Smart Insulin Patches Or Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery Systems

Smart Insulin Patches or Glucose-Responsive Insulin Delivery Systems A promising approach that could be a game-changer for patients with diabetes. Since its discovery and isolation, exogenous insulin has resulted dramatically change in the prognosis for patients with diabetes. Nowadays, novel insulin analogues have improved pharmacokinetic profiles mirroring endogenous basal and prandial insulin secretion more closely. However, despite advances in insulin formulations and in closed loop systems combined with advanced continuous glucose-monitoring systems and external insulin infusion pumps, glucose control still remains a challenge. Patients with diabetes do not achieve their glycemic targets and hypoglycemia continues to be the major hurdle for intensification of insulin therapy. Figure 1 - The smart insulin patch (microneedle array patch) (simplified representation) So far, the early-stage preclinical pipeline for glucose-responsive insulin (smart insulin) is fairly crowded, whereas the majority of the current advanced candidates have not progressed beyond preclinical development. This is unfortunate; because a successful "smart insulin" in glucose-responsive "closed-loop" insulin delivery system that is able to deliver insulin in response to elevated blood glucose would provide optimized glucose control with minimal patient effort and potential improvement in quality of life for patients with diabetes. A working group of North Carolina State University (UNC) has developed a promising delivery system so called smart insulin patch (array of tiny needles) (see Figure 1) which could be placed anywhere on the body to detect and deliver insulin according to changes in the glucose concentrations. Therefore, a perfect glucose-responsive insulin delivery system might be a ga Continue reading >>

Toward A Smart Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward A Smart Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward a smart patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed ACS News Service Weekly PressPac:Wed Jan 18 10:17:11 EST 2017 Toward a smart patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed " H2O2-Responsive Vesicles Integrated with Transcutaneous Patches for Glucose-Mediated Insulin Delivery " Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless smart patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The report on the device, which has been tested on mice, appears in the journal ACS Nano. People with Type 1 diabetes dont make insulin a hormone that regulates blood glucose, or sugar. Those with Type 2 diabetes cant use insulin effectively. Either way, glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputation of toes, feet or legs. To avoid these outcomes, people with Type 1 or advanced Type 2 diabetes regularly prick their fingers to measure blood-sugar levels, and some patients must inject themselves with insulin when needed. But sometimes, despite a persons vigilance, glucose levels can still get out of whack. Zhen Gu and colleagues wanted to come up with a simpler, more effective, shot-free way to manage diabetes. The researchers developed a skin patch covered in painless microneedles that are loaded with tiny insulin-carrying pouches. The pouches are engineered to break apart rapidly and release the insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Diabetic mice wearing the patch maintained consistent concentrations of insulin in their blood. When these mice received a shot of glucose, their blood sugar levels spiked initially, but then fell to n Continue reading >>

Biomedical Spinout Company Raises $5.8 Million For Smart Insulin Devices

Biomedical Spinout Company Raises $5.8 Million For Smart Insulin Devices

Biomedical spinout company raises $5.8 million for smart insulin devices November 20, 2017 | Engineering Communications A Research Triangle Park startup founded by Dr. Zhen Gu, associate professor in the UNC/NC State Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering, has received a $5.8 million cash commitment to continue translation efforts of smart insulin devices. The technology invented in Gus lab could soon mean painless diabetes testing and insulin injections for the nearly 400 million people with diabetes worldwide. The $5.8 million Zenomics, Inc. raised was from MicroPort Scientific Corporation, a biomedical device company that promotes the translation of Gus patented smart insulin technology. The microneedles hundreds of which fit onto the coin-sized patch or other smart device platform feature microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing components, Gu explained. When blood sugar levels get too high, the microneedles automatically release insulin, combining the testing with the insulin injection in a pain-free and perfectly timed manner that requires little to no effort by the person wearing the device. If this translates successfully, this technology will enhance the health of patients with diabetes and improve their lives, Gu said. The technology is painless and it also lessens human error, so that you receive a more accurate blood-sugar controlling. With this round of investment funding, Zenomics, Inc., which Gu co-founded in September 2015, will continue furthering this technology, while also recruiting employees to staff its labs. Additional testing will be on large animal models. If the technology were to be effective and efficacious in large animals, clinical trials in humans could follow. This news is exciting for our universities, the state of Continue reading >>

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