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Smart Insulin Patch

A Smart Insulin Patch May Aid Future Therapies

A Smart Insulin Patch May Aid Future Therapies

A Smart Insulin Patch May Aid Future Therapies A smart insulin patch, once translated for humans, could eliminate the need for constant blood testing and help diabetics maintain a more consistent level of blood glucose. Yanqi Ye, a Ph.D. student in biomedical engineering, was home in China last year when her NC State professor, Zhen Gu, asked if she could present a paper at a conference there. It became an ahha moment for Ye, helping her to see what a difference her research project could have in the lives of diabetics. Ye talked about the research she has been working on in biomedical engineering: using a smart insulin patch to detect glucose levels and administer insulin in mice. Once translated for humans, it could eliminate the need for constant blood testing and help diabetics maintain a more consistent level of blood glucose. Though the project is still in animal trials, the idea impressed one man at the conference so much that he invited his diabetic father to come to the conference to meet Ye. His dad has very serious diabeteslate stage diabetes. He suffered a lot from leg pain, one of the diabetic complications. His doctor forced him to inject the insulin, but he didnt like that, Ye said. The mans father wanted to know when the smart insulin patch might be ready for human use. Though human trials are still years away, meeting a person who would actually benefit from her research inspired Ye. The smart insulin patch that Ye is studying in mice combines the nanotechnology of tiny pyramid-shaped microneedles with pancreatic cells that detect glucose levels. The needles in the patcheach 800 micrometers long and thinner than a human hairpenetrate only the top layer of skin, making it painless. She carries a sample of the mouse patch in a petri dish; it is about the Continue reading >>

Smart Diabetes Patch Gets Smarter

Smart Diabetes Patch Gets Smarter

Implanting beta cells has been a promising, yet problematic approach to treating diabetes. These cells live in the pancreas and, in healthy people, secrete vital insulin to regulate blood sugar levels. But in sufferers of diabetes they don't quite work as required. Building on previous work on a smart insulin patch, scientists have now discovered a way of delivering the effects of these cells in a way that overcomes some of the complications. For decades, scientists have been exploring beta cell transplants as a way of getting diabetes sufferers the insulin they need, without the 24-hour monitoring and uncomfortable injections. While hundreds of these procedures have been carried out, only a fraction of them are successful. This is because the recipient's immune system often rejects the foreign cells, and while drugs can be taken to suppress these attacks, they can also spoil the effectiveness of the freshly implanted cells while they're at it. So researchers at the University of North Carolina (UNC) at Chapel Hill and North Carolina State University set out to develop a device that would keep these beta cells beyond the grasps of the immune system, but still capable of performing their role. Their latest work actually builds on a device they unveiled last year, described as smart insulin patch . This patch was designed to mimic the effects of the body's beta cells, by releasing tiny insulin bubbles into the bloodstream when required through more than 100 microneedles. Instead of loading the microneedles, each about the size of an eyelash, with insulin, this time around the researchers filled them with thousands of live beta cells. These cells were protected in tiny capsules made from a biocompatible alginate. When the patch made from materials commonly used in cosmeti Continue reading >>

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin Patch - How The Insulin Patch Works, Challenges, Research

Insulin patches would present a needle free method of taking insulin Insulin patches are currently an experimental form of insulin delivery that are at an early stage of research. An insulin patch aims to painlessly deliver insulin through the skin similar to how transdermal patches such as nicotine patches or muscle pain relief patches work. If insulin patches can be successfully developed, it would present the chance for people on insulin therapy to take insulin without needing to put needles or cannulas (the very thin tube that delivers insulin into the body from insulin pumps) into the body. Looking for information on patch pumps? See types of insulin pumps . An insulin patch works by being placed on the skin and agents within the patch help insulin to pass through the skin and then into blood stream. An insulin patch contains a set dose of insulin that is absorbed over a number of hours. Different types of insulin patches have been developed to release insulin more quickly to counteract rises in blood sugar following meals (bolus insulin patches) and other insulin patches have been developed to counteract the gradual release of glucose through the day by the liver (basal insulin patches). The challenges in developing an insulin patch Insulin patches may seem an obvious form of delivery, however, the challenge in successfully developing an insulin patch has been that insulin is a large molecule and therefore is not usually absorbed by the skin. Insulin patches therefore require agents to help the insulin pass through the skin and to do so in a controlled and consistent way so as to prevent too high or too low blood glucose levels from occurring. A bolus insulin patch is currently being developed by researchers at the University of KwaZulu-Natal. The insulin patch u Continue reading >>

A Smart Insulin Patch | Nature

A Smart Insulin Patch | Nature

A microneedle-containing patch that is designed to sense elevated blood glucose levels and to respond by releasing insulin could offer people with diabetes a less-painful and more-reliable way to manage their condition. Diabetes is widely recognized as one of the biggest medical challenges of the twenty-first century, afflicting more than 280 million people globally 1 . People with diabetes must tirelessly self-monitor their blood glucose levels and inject the correct dose of the glucose-lowering hormone insulin to keep their blood glucose levels in the normal range 2 . This treatment regime involves challenges it requires painful and inconvenient subcutaneous injections, is imprecise, and can cause serious problems if insulin dosage is not closely tuned to the patient's immediate physiological needs 3 . Reporting in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, Yu et al. 4 describe a glucose-responsive microneedle patch that can be painlessly applied to the skin and that releases insulin as blood glucose levels increase. 'Smart' glucose-responsive insulin-based therapies involve the automatic release of insulin in response to increases in blood glucose concentration. Smart therapies can improve disease control and limit the potential for excessively low blood glucose levels, which is a potentially deadly effect of excessive insulin dosing 3 . To mimic the physiological needs of a patient accurately, such therapies must respond rapidly to elevated glucose levels, and must release insulin with kinetics that closely mirror those of a healthy pancreas. One type of smart therapy makes use of microcomputer-controlled insulin-delivery systems. These systems couple implantable continuous glucose monitors (CGMs) to automated pumps, and administer insulin through a subcutane Continue reading >>

How The Smart Insulin Patch Is A Breakthrough For Insulin Delivery

How The Smart Insulin Patch Is A Breakthrough For Insulin Delivery

How the Smart Insulin Patch is a Breakthrough for Insulin... How the Smart Insulin Patch is a Breakthrough for Insulin Delivery Diabetes is a disease that affects an estimated one million people or more in the United states alone. Its a disease thats characterized by the bodys inability to make, process or use insulin sufficiently. Diabetes can affect just about anyone but there are risk factors that make some more susceptible than others. By far obesity is the biggest risk factor, followed by a family history of the disease. Blood glucose or sugar is what the body uses for energy, insulin is the hormone that helps to convert the glucose into energy for use in other parts of the body. It is created in the pancreas, which uses consumed food to create insulin. When the pancreas is unable to convert the glucose for use by the body, it stays in the blood stream and builds up causing other health issues. There are two main types of diabetes: Type I and Type II. Both are different in the way that they affect the body and the ways in which theyre treated. In Type I diabetes the body cannot create insulin because the immune system of the body will attack the cells in the pancreas that are responsible for that task. This is the form of diabetes that is most commonly found in children and young adults. Treatment for this type is taking daily insulin shots as well as strict dietary management and monitoring of blood glucose levels. Have a question aboutDiabetes? Ask a doctor now Type II diabetes is usually diagnosed in adults of middle age, but can also be found in children and is often brought on by obesity. While the pancreas in type II diabetes can sometimes make insulin, it may not make enough or the body will not use what is made efficiently. With diabetes comes a lot of ris Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Injections for Diabetes Insulin-filled nanoparticles may be game changer, expert says Insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans with diabetes, according to researchers at the University of North Carolina and North Carolina State, who have created a smart insulin patch that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch a thin square no larger than a penny is covered with more than 100 microneedles, each about the size of an eyelash. These tiny needles are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes, which rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. In a study published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the researchers found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type-1 diabetes for up to 9 hours. More preclinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients. We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials, said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD. The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetics weight and sensitivity to insulin, so we could make the smart patch even smarter. Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 million by the year 2035. Patients with type-1 and advanced type-2 diabetes try to keep their blood sugar levels under control with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. Co-senior author John Buse, MD, PhD, said, Injecting the wrong amount of medication can lead to significant compli Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

Diabetes: Smart Insulin Patches Developed At Unc, Ncsu A Step Closer To Market | News & Observer

The Joint Department of Biomedical Engineering at UNC-Chapel Hill and N.C. State University was founded in 2003 to bring engineers and medical researchers together to solve pressing healthcare issues. Gu, an associate professor in the department, has been working with his colleagues to remedy the imperfections of current insulin delivery methods. In the healthy body, insulin secretion always quickly follows the blood sugar levels, says Gu. We want to mimic this process in a scientific way ourselves. Their solution is a glucose-responsive smart insulin patch that is worn on the skin and instantaneously releases insulin as needed. Roughly the same size as a dime, the patch contains 121 microneedles, each thinner than a human hair and pre-loaded with tiny packets of insulin and glucose oxidase, an enzyme that immediately responds to high glucose levels and sparks a reaction that releases insulin. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need this patch. But no one is perfect. Susan Spratt, associate professor of medicine at Duke University The on-demand actions of the insulin patches could help people with diabetes worry less about their glucose levels regardless of their activity levels and food intake while also increasing the accuracy of insulin dosing. Not only would the patch prevent high blood glucose, it also would reduce the chance of taking too much insulin, which can result in dangerously low blood glucose levels. If youre a very strict, Type A person who is on an extreme schedule, basically always eats the same thing, has the same activity, and youre really good at math and nutrition, then you might not need th Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin - Wikipedia

Smart Insulin - Wikipedia

Smart insulin (also known as glucose responsive insulin, adaptive insulin, smart insulin patch, or MK-2640-001 (Merck) or Sensulin [1] , the namesake company's key product in development) is a promising and experimental type of insulin that automatically manages blood sugars and keeps them in the normal range in diabetics. Its purpose is to treat and prevent hyperglycemia . Smart insulin is supposed to adapt by releasing either less or more insulin relative to the level of glucose in the bloodstream to keep it stable. It is primarily used to treat type 1 diabetics, but will eventually be used on type 2 diabetics. A constant amount would be injected every so often and it would adapt to the user's blood sugar levels. This would eliminate the need for worrying about an insulin:carb ratio. Frequent hypo and hypergylcemia would be a thing of the past. Many of the major pharmaceutical companies are researching this new drug. Merck , Eli Lilly , and Sanofi are just a few. Merck started a study in November 2014. The study was completed in July 2016, but no results have been posted. [2] Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patches Or Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery Systems

Smart Insulin Patches Or Glucose-responsive Insulin Delivery Systems

Smart Insulin Patches or Glucose-Responsive Insulin Delivery Systems A promising approach that could be a game-changer for patients with diabetes. Since its discovery and isolation, exogenous insulin has resulted dramatically change in the prognosis for patients with diabetes. Nowadays, novel insulin analogues have improved pharmacokinetic profiles mirroring endogenous basal and prandial insulin secretion more closely. However, despite advances in insulin formulations and in closed loop systems combined with advanced continuous glucose-monitoring systems and external insulin infusion pumps, glucose control still remains a challenge. Patients with diabetes do not achieve their glycemic targets and hypoglycemia continues to be the major hurdle for intensification of insulin therapy. Figure 1 - The smart insulin patch (microneedle array patch) (simplified representation) So far, the early-stage preclinical pipeline for glucose-responsive insulin (smart insulin) is fairly crowded, whereas the majority of the current advanced candidates have not progressed beyond preclinical development. This is unfortunate; because a successful "smart insulin" in glucose-responsive "closed-loop" insulin delivery system that is able to deliver insulin in response to elevated blood glucose would provide optimized glucose control with minimal patient effort and potential improvement in quality of life for patients with diabetes. A working group of North Carolina State University (UNC) has developed a promising delivery system so called smart insulin patch (array of tiny needles) (see Figure 1) which could be placed anywhere on the body to detect and deliver insulin according to changes in the glucose concentrations. Therefore, a perfect glucose-responsive insulin delivery system might be a ga Continue reading >>

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be A Game Changer

New Smart Insulin Patch Could Be a Game Changer The smart insulin patch. The lab of Zhen Gu, Ph.D. For many who suffer from diabetes, insulin injections can be a painful and imprecise process of keeping their blood sugar levels under control. A new smart insulin patch could do away with these painful injections and revolutionize the way diabetics keep their blood sugar levels in check. The patch, created by researchers from the University of North Carolina and NC State, is a thin square covered with more than 100 tiny needles.According to researchers, the patch works fast, is simple to use and is made from biocompatible materials.The patchs tiny, painless needles are packed with insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes in microscopic storage units. The patch is able to release these enzymes when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, published in Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences , showed promising results in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes. Researchers hope to see similar success in subsequent clinical trials in humans. Around 387 million people worldwide suffer from diabetes. These patients keep their blood sugar in check by monitoring their levels with regular finger pricks and repeated insulin shots. If the wrong amount of medication is injected, patients could suffer from severe complications. "The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic's weight and sensitivity to insulin," said co-senior author Zhen Guin a statement, "so we could make the smart patch even smarter." The study found that the patch lowered blood glucose in mice for up to nine hours. As mice are less sensitive to insulin than humans, researchers suggest the patch can have a longer-lasting effect in diabetic patients. The patch emulates beta cells, which generate and Continue reading >>

Toward A 'smart' Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward A 'smart' Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward a 'smart' patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed January 18, 2017, American Chemical Society Tiny, painless microneedles on a patch can deliver insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Credit: American Chemical Society Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless "smart" patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The report on the device, which has been tested on mice, appears in the journal ACS Nano. People with Type 1 diabetes don't make insulina hormone that regulates blood glucose , or sugar. Those with Type 2 diabetes can't use insulin effectively. Either way, glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputation of toes, feet or legs. To avoid these outcomes, people with Type 1 or advanced Type 2 diabetes regularly prick their fingers to measure blood-sugar levels, and some patients must inject themselves with insulin when needed. But sometimes, despite a person's vigilance, glucose levels can still get out of whack. Zhen Gu and colleagues wanted to come up with a simpler, more effective, shot-free way to manage diabetes. The researchers developed a skin patch covered in painless microneedles that are loaded with tiny insulin-carrying pouches. The pouches are engineered to break apart rapidly and release the insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Diabetic mice wearing the patch maintained consistent concentrations of insulin in their blood. When these mice received a shot of glucose, their blood sugar levels spiked initially, but then fell to normal levels within two hours. More information: Xiuli Continue reading >>

Toward A Smart Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward A Smart Patch That Automatically Delivers Insulin When Needed

Toward a smart patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed ACS News Service Weekly PressPac:Wed Jan 18 10:17:11 EST 2017 Toward a smart patch that automatically delivers insulin when needed " H2O2-Responsive Vesicles Integrated with Transcutaneous Patches for Glucose-Mediated Insulin Delivery " Treatment for certain diabetes cases involves constant monitoring of blood-glucose levels and daily insulin shots. But scientists are now developing a painless smart patch that monitors blood glucose and releases insulin when levels climb too high. The report on the device, which has been tested on mice, appears in the journal ACS Nano. People with Type 1 diabetes dont make insulin a hormone that regulates blood glucose, or sugar. Those with Type 2 diabetes cant use insulin effectively. Either way, glucose builds up in the blood, which can lead to a host of health problems, including heart disease, stroke, blindness and amputation of toes, feet or legs. To avoid these outcomes, people with Type 1 or advanced Type 2 diabetes regularly prick their fingers to measure blood-sugar levels, and some patients must inject themselves with insulin when needed. But sometimes, despite a persons vigilance, glucose levels can still get out of whack. Zhen Gu and colleagues wanted to come up with a simpler, more effective, shot-free way to manage diabetes. The researchers developed a skin patch covered in painless microneedles that are loaded with tiny insulin-carrying pouches. The pouches are engineered to break apart rapidly and release the insulin in response to rising glucose levels. Diabetic mice wearing the patch maintained consistent concentrations of insulin in their blood. When these mice received a shot of glucose, their blood sugar levels spiked initially, but then fell to n Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 'smart Insulin Patch' Could Revolutionize Glucose Control

Diabetes: 'smart Insulin Patch' Could Revolutionize Glucose Control

Diabetes: 'smart insulin patch' could revolutionize glucose control Patients with diabetes have to control their blood sugar by regularly pricking their finger and giving themselves insulin shots. The procedure is painful and imprecise - injecting the wrong amount of insulin can lead to serious complications, and in some cases, coma and death. The researchers aim to develop a smart insulin patch that would only need to be changed every few days. Now, the development of a "smart insulin patch" could one day make such an ordeal a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes , according to the team behind the innovation, which includes members from the University of North Carolina (UNC) in Chapel Hill and NC State in Raleigh. The smart patch - a square sliver of tape no larger than a penny - has more than a hundred microneedles, each about the size of an eyelash, containing tiny reservoirs of insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes. The device - which can be placed anywhere on the body - senses when blood sugar levels get too high and rapidly discharges the right amount of insulin into the bloodstream. In the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, the diabetes doctors and biomedical engineers that invented the painless patch describe how they tested it in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes and showed it lowered blood glucose for severalhours. While it shows great promise, it is too early to say if and when the patch can be used in human patients - the team says more tests and then clinical trials are needed. Patch mimics body's own system for generating insulin The smart insulin patch works by mimicking the body's own system for generating insulin - the beta cells of the pancreas - which produce and store insulin in tiny sacs or vesicles. T Continue reading >>

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Smart Insulin Patch Could Replace Painful Injections For Diabetes

Media contact: Mark Derewicz, 919-923-0959, [email protected] CHAPEL HILL, NC – Painful insulin injections could become a thing of the past for the millions of Americans who suffer from diabetes, thanks to a new invention from researchers at the University of North Carolina and NC State, who have created a “smart insulin patch” that can detect increases in blood sugar levels and secrete doses of insulin into the bloodstream whenever needed. The patch – a thin square no bigger than a penny – is covered with more than one hundred tiny needles, each about the size of an eyelash. These “microneedles” are packed with microscopic storage units for insulin and glucose-sensing enzymes that rapidly release their cargo when blood sugar levels get too high. The study, which is published in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, found that the new, painless patch could lower blood glucose in a mouse model of type 1 diabetes for up to nine hours. More pre-clinical tests and subsequent clinical trials in humans will be required before the patch can be administered to patients, but the approach shows great promise. “We have designed a patch for diabetes that works fast, is easy to use, and is made from nontoxic, biocompatible materials,” said co-senior author Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the Joint UNC/NC State Department of Biomedical Engineering. Gu also holds appointments in the UNC School of Medicine, the UNC Eshelman School of Pharmacy, and the UNC Diabetes Care Center. “The whole system can be personalized to account for a diabetic’s weight and sensitivity to insulin,” he added, “so we could make the smart patch even smarter.” Diabetes affects more than 387 million people worldwide, and that number is expected to grow to 592 mill Continue reading >>

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

'smart Insulin Patch' For Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials

"Smart Insulin Patch" for Diabetes Is Years From Human Trials A "smart insulin patch" that could potentially dispel the need for painful insulin injections for millions of people worldwide with diabetes has been developed by a team at the University of North Carolina (UNC) and North Carolina State University. It employs painless microneedles to sense the low oxygen environment created when glucose levels rise and then delivers insulin as required. This is the first approach adopting this strategy of sensing low oxygen levels; other similar nanoparticle technologies in development rely instead on detecting changes in pH. However, the patch has so far only been tested in murine models of type 1 diabetes; a study detailing the findings in mice was published online on June 22, 2015 in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences. "We are now moving toward preclinical, minipig-based studies before moving to clinical trials," said senior author Dr Zhen Gu, PhD, a professor in the joint UNC/NC State department of biomedical engineering. "If successful, we will test the patch on humans. It would take several years, most likely around 3 to 4 years, until potential clinical trials." "If we can get these patches to work in people, it will be a game changer," said John Buse, MD, PhD, another author, in a press release. Dr Buse is director of the UNC Diabetes Care Center and past president of the American Diabetes Association. Asked to comment, Richard Elliott, MD, research communications manager at Diabetes UK, said: "Alongside the insulin pumps that are already widely available, this 'smart patch' is one of a number of experimental approaches that are hoping to eliminate, or at least reduce, the need for insulin injections to manage diabetes effectively." But "significant Continue reading >>

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