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Signs Of Too Much Insulin In Cats

Diabetes And Your Cat

Diabetes And Your Cat

Diabetes is one of the most common feline endocrine disorders. Diabetes occurs when the pancreas fails to produce adequate amounts of insulin, a hormone necessary for controlling blood glucose (sugar) levels. Most cats show excessive urination, excessive thirst, an increase in appetite, and weight loss. High blood sugar levels and the presence of sugar in the urine usually allow for a straightforward diagnosis, but occasionally some additional tests may be necessary before arriving at a definitive diagnosis. Care for your cat with diabetes Caring for a diabetic cat isn’t as difficult as many owners might anticipate at first. Here are the basics for keeping your feline friend comfortable and healthy: Insulin injections will need to be given twice daily. Your veterinarian will go over insulin dose and administration techniques with you. Let your veterinarian know if you have any questions. Only use the recommended brand of insulin and the specific type of insulin syringes recommended by your veterinarian. Contact your veterinarian if your feel your pharmacy may have sent you home with different insulin or syringes from what was recommended. Obtain a new bottle of insulin in the time interval recommended by your veterinarian. Most recommend changing to a new bottle every 3 months, as insulin may lose its effectiveness beyond that time period. Discuss with your veterinarian whether a diet change might be necessary. Many cats on dry diet can benefit from switching to canned food. Only change your cat’s diet under the guidance of your veterinarian. Pay close attention to your pet’s appetite, water intake, urination habits, and overall energy level. These may give an early clue that we may need to do a recheck to change insulin doses. Do not change insulin doses without Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats - Overview

Diabetes Mellitus In Cats - Overview

By Ernest Ward, DVM & Robin Downing, DVM, DAAPM, DACVSMR, CVPP Emergency Situations, Medical Conditions What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a disease of the pancreas, a small organ located near the stomach. The pancreas has two different types of cells that have very different functions. One group of cells produces the enzymes necessary for proper digestion. The other group, called beta cells, produces the hormone insulin, which regulates the level of glucose (sugar) in the bloodstream and controls the delivery of glucose to the tissues of the body. In simple terms, diabetes mellitus is caused by the failure of the pancreas to regulate blood sugar. The clinical signs of diabetes mellitus are related to elevated concentrations of blood glucose and the inability of the body to use glucose as an energy source. What are the clinical signs of diabetes mellitus in cats? The four main symptoms of diabetes mellitus are increased thirst, increased urination, weight loss, and increased appetite. Because of the nature of cats, these signs may go unnoticed, especially in the early stages of disease or if a cat spends a lot of time outdoors. Cats that are fed canned or semi-moist diets receive much of their water intake from their food, and increased water intake will be harder to recognize. Are there different types of diabetes mellitus in cats? Diabetes mellitus is usually classified into 2 types of disease: Type I diabetes mellitus results from total or near-complete destruction of the beta cells. This appears to be a rare type of diabetes in the cat. Type II diabetes mellitus is different because some insulin-producing cells remain, but the amount of insulin produced is insufficient, there is a delayed response in secreting it, or the tissues of the cat's body are re Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes: Symptoms, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Cat Diabetes is a fairly common condition of many cats. My clients are sometimes surprised to hear that a cat can develop diabetes. It comes down again to the fact that cats have almost all of the same organs we do and if they malfunction, our kitties develop the same diseases we do. Diabetes is a chronic illness that changes how carbohydrates are processed in your cat's body due to insulin resistance or a poor response to natural insulin. For those who don't know, insulin is needed to regulate glucose in your cat's bloodstream, which creates problems with a number of metabolic functions, as well as the kidneys, heart, skin, and eyes among other vital organs. After treating diabetic cats for over 20 years in my feline veterinary practice, I, for the first time, diagnosed diabetes in my own cat a few years ago. Index Symptoms of Cat Diabetes It's important to know the most frequent symptoms of feline diabetes because they are usually easy to recognize. It is important to catch them early and begin treatment early, as diabetes can be quite manageable and a diabetic cat can live a normal lifespan if treated quickly and effectively. (1) Increased Thirst (2) Increased Urination (3) An increased appetite in the beginning which may decrease over time if not diagnosed and treated (4) Weight loss, although diabetic cats often begin as overweight cats (5) As time goes on, lethargy, vomiting, and diarrhea may appear (6) If a cat is diabetic too long without diagnosis and treatment, you will begin to see a change in the back legs as he walks. Instead of walking up on his "toes" as cats do, his hocks will become lower to the ground and the cat will almost walk flat-footed. This is due to a condition called diabetic neuropathy and indicates the disease has been present for quite some Continue reading >>

The Danger Of Giving Diabetic Cats Too Much Insulin

The Danger Of Giving Diabetic Cats Too Much Insulin

If your cat is diagnosed with diabetes, you may soon find you're required to give the cat insulin injections once or twice a day, which can lead to an accidental overdose. Keep reading to learn what to do if your cat has received too much insulin. Insulin overdose can cause your cat to use too much of its body's blood sugar. This is a condition called hypoglycemia, and it can become fatal very quickly. Symptoms of Hypoglycemia Look for signs of disorientation, unusual hiding behavior and crying or yowling. Drooling and a ‘glassy-eyed' look are common. A cat with hypoglycemia might be lethargic. Be alert for other behaviors like walking in circles or poor coordination. Watch for a sudden extreme hunger or a total disinterest in food. Seizures or coma appear in extreme cases, and require immediate emergency treatment. Causes of Hypoglycemia Even when you're giving the dosage prescribed by your vet and following correct procedures, your cat can get too much insulin in its system. A cat's need for insulin can rapidly increase or decrease, requiring a change in dosage regimen. Some cats even go into a sudden remission, where the pancreas begins to secrete enough insulin, meaning the cat no longer needs insulin injections for a time. This is why your vet will arrange regular visits to check for changes in your cat's condition, and increase or lower dosages if necessary. Most of the time, when a cat has too much insulin in its body, it's because of a mistake or mishap related to giving injections. The most common mistake is an accidental double-dose. This usually occurs when two different people in the family each give the cat a regular insulin injection, or an incorrect measurement of a dose. If you give your cat its injection right before feeding time and it doesn't eat, o Continue reading >>

How To Treat Feline Diabetes

How To Treat Feline Diabetes

Expert Reviewed Feline diabetes mellitus, also known as feline sugar diabetes, is one of the most common hormonal disorders diagnosed in cats. It causes excess of sugar in your cat's blood stream because the pancreas does not work properly, which causes your cat to get sick.[1] If you cat has been diagnosed, there are ways to treat feline diabetes. 1 Treat underlying conditions. Your vet will look for and treating underlying illnesses that may be causing improper insulin production. The body responds poorly to insulin in the presence of certain illness, so the vet will look for and correct these underlying problems. These conditions include: 2 Put your cat on a diet. Being overweight can cause diabetes. There is a chance that cats who are overweight may no longer be diabetic if your cat returns to an ideal weight.[4] This should be done in a controlled manner to sustain your cat's energy levels. It also needs to be satisfying enough for your cat to feel full and happy. The vet may suggest a prescription diet designed for contained weight loss purpose. If you don't want a prescription diet, talk with your vet about a nutritional plan for your cat. In addition to a diet, your cat should also get more exercise each day as well to help bring the weight off.[6] 3 Feed your cat in the right way. If you are not trying to help your cat lose weight, you need to feed your cat in a way that will help level out blood glucose levels. Your cat's diet should contain foods that releases energy slowly, which will help avoid peaks in your cat's blood glucose levels. This can either be a high fiber diet or a high protein, low carbohydrate diet. Ask you vet which is best for your cat if you are unsure.[7] If your cat is also undergoing insulin therapy, your vet will advise you on when you Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar In Cats

Low Blood Sugar In Cats

Hypoglycemia in Cats The blood sugar, or glucose, is a main energy of source in an animal's body, so a low amount will result in a severe decrease in energy levels, possibly to the point of loss of consciousness. The medical term for critically low levels of sugar in the blood is hypoglycemia, and it is often linked to diabetes and an overdose of insulin. However, there are different conditions, other than diabetes, that can also cause blood sugar levels to drop to dangerous levels in cats. In most animals, hypoglycemia is actually not a disease in and of itself, but is only an indication of another underlying health problem. The brain actually needs a steady supply of glucose in order to function properly, as it does not store and create glucose itself. When glucose levels drop to a dangerously low level, a condition of hypoglycemia takes place. This is a dangerous health condition and needs to be treated quickly and appropriately. If you suspect hypoglycemia, especially if your cat is disposed to this condition, you will need to treat the condition quickly before it becomes life threatening. Symptoms Loss of appetite (anorexia) Increased hunger Visual instability, such as blurred vision Disorientation and confusion — may show an apparent inability to complete basic routine tasks Weakness, low energy, loss of consciousness Seizures (rare) Anxiety, restlessness Tremor/shivering Heart palpitations These symptoms may not be specific to hypoglycemia, there can be other possible underlying medical causes. The best way to determine hypoglycemia if by having the blood sugar level measured while the symptoms are apparent. Causes There may be several causes for hypoglycemia, but the most common is the side effects caused by drugs that are being used to treat diabetes. Cats wi Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes

Feline Diabetes

Insulin injections are the preferred method of managing diabetes in cats. Figure 1: To administer an injection, pull the loose skin between the shoulder blades with one hand. With the other hand, insert the needle directly into the indentation made by holding up the skin, draw back on the plunger slightly, and if no blood appears in the syringe, inject gently. Tips for Treatment 1. You can do it! Treating your cat may sound difficult, but for most owners it soon becomes routine. 2. Work very closely with your veterinarian to get the best results for your cat. 3. Once your cat has been diagnosed, it's best to start insulin therapy as soon as possible. 4. Home glucose monitoring can be very helpful. 5. Tracking your cat's water intake, activity level, appetite, and weight can be beneficial. 6. A low carbohydrate diet helps diabetic cats maintain proper glucose levels. 7. With careful treatment, your cat's diabetes may well go into remission. 8. If your cat shows signs of hypoglycemia (lethargy, weakness, tremors, seizures, vomiting) apply honey, a glucose solution, or dextrose gel to the gums and immediately contact a veterinarian. Possible Complications Insulin therapy lowers blood glucose, possibly to dangerously low levels. Signs of hypoglycemia include weakness, lethargy, vomiting, lack of coordination, seizures, and coma. Hypoglycemia can be fatal if left untreated, so any diabetic cat that shows any of these signs should be offered its regular food immediately. If the cat does not eat voluntarily, it should be given oral glucose in the form of honey, corn syrup, or proprietary dextrose gels (available at most pharmacies) and brought to a veterinarian immediately. It is important, however, that owners not attempt to force fingers, food, or fluids into the mouth of a Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes Mellitus

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a medical condition resulting in an excessive amount of glucose or sugar in the blood. It is literally starvation in the face of plenty, because the body cannot utilize the glucose in the blood stream. Glucose must attach to insulin, which then carries it into the cells to be used for energy. A deficiency in insulin, which is a hormone secreted by the pancreas, leads to too much glucose in the blood and not enough glucose inside the cells where it is needed. Diabetes mellitus affects an estimated one in four hundred cats, and is seen more frequently in middle to old-age cats and is more common in males than females. What are the clinical signs of diabetes mellitus? The clinical signs seen in diabetes are largely related to the elevated concentrations of blood glucose and to the inability of the body to use that glucose as an energy source due to the deficiency of insulin. The most common clinical signs seen in diabetic patients are an increase in water consumption and an increase in urination. Weight loss is also a common feature, and an increase in appetite may be noticed in some cats. Recognition of these signs is variable though, particularly because of the life-style of some cats. If a cat spends a lot of time outdoors, it may drink from ponds or pools of water outside rather than appearing to drink excessively from what is provided indoors. Cats that are fed canned or moist diets receive much of their water intake from their diet and increased water intake will be less easily recognized in these patients. How is diabetes mellitus diagnosed? The diagnosis of diabetes mellitus is made based on clinical signs, persistently elevated blood glucose concentration and the presence of glucose in the urine. However, a diagnosis Continue reading >>

Cat Diabetes And Glucose Fluctuations

Cat Diabetes And Glucose Fluctuations

Dr. Neely, My 15 year old cat was just diagnosed with feline diabetes. I check his glucose level twice a day. It can vary from as low as 57 to as high as 395 in a single day. He usually gets 2 things of insulin, but when it is really low I just skip it. The insulin he is on is Lantus. He has already had an ultrasound, full body xrays, blood panel checking his pancreas and thyroid, etc., and urine tests. But there seems to be no underlying cause. What to do? Could there be something wrong with the glucose meter? I really am at wits end. My vet has not come up with any answers. Can you help??? It doesn’t sound to me as though there is anything very wrong with your cat’s diabetes treatment thus far. Fluctuation in the blood glucose levels of a diabetic cat is normal, but there are many ways now to help regulate your cat. As time has progressed with treating diabetic felines, we have learned that we should actually be treating our cats more similarly to how we would treat a person with diabetes. The best thing to do is to feed a low carbohydrate diet, test multiple times daily, and make insulin dosage adjustments according to your cat’s blood glucose readings. Skipping doses when your cat is low can certainly create a significantly higher reading later on, especially if there has been 12 hours between your readings. Generally, if your cat is low, according to a tight regulation protocol, you would test again in a few hours to catch your cat before he gets too high again. But even if that is not the cause of your cat’s high readings, sometimes giving too much insulin can cause these spikes as well. What happens in this case is that your cat’s glucose actually gets too low, and it causes rebound effect, creating a skyrocketing blood glucose level later in the day. R Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes In Cats On Cat Health Behavior.com

Symptoms Of Diabetes In Cats On Cat Health Behavior.com

Diabetes in cats is a condition arising from insufficient insulin in the cats body. Insulin is an important hormone produced by the pancreas that regulates blood and glucose. When there’s not enough insulin, blood glucose increases to an unhealthy level and might cause some symptoms. Some of the more common symptoms are weight-loss, increased thirst and urination, abnormal or increased appetite, poor coat quality and general signs of ill health. If uncorrected these cat symptoms can progress over days or weeks to include poor appetite, vomiting, dehydration and in extreme cases a coma or even death can occur. Diabetes in cats is usually detected in middle aged to older animals and is slightly more common in males than in female cats. Over weight and inactive pets also have increased likely hood of developing this issue. The number one symptom of the ailment is increased thirst and very frequent urination, which can be caused by other conditions or sickness as well. Diabetic Condition in Cats This condition can develop over weeks or months, and in uncomplicated cases is not an urgent condition. At the time of diagnosis many cats will have been living with it for some time. A cats metabolism has been known to adjust somewhat for the elevated glucose. However, if diabetes in cats is untreated the condition can worsen and can become an emergency or even a life-threatening situation. In these cases the cat will have developed severe symptoms and complications arising from the chronic high blood sugar levels. Death can occur if treatment is not sought out immediately due to damage to internal organs and complications associated with a diabetic condition. How to Treat Feline Diabetes Never restrict access to water when a cat has increased thirst. Even if the cat is urinating Continue reading >>

Diabetic Cat Diet.

Diabetic Cat Diet.

Hi, I am the owner of two siamese cats (female) from same litter - 11.5 years old. Both are diabetic. Emma went into DKA 2.5 years old, which is how we found out she was diabetic. She was extremely sick at the time and very dehydrated. We fought hard for her at the vet and almost lost her. She even went on to become jaundice. She wouldn't eat at all and had to be force fed. However, she did recover and was discharged. 6 months later my other cat was diagnosed with diabetes, but we recognized the early signs so she never was in DKA. They get 2 insulin injections a day with meals. We monitor their sugars, but only weekly as they hate the glucometer so much. It's often hard to monitor that they both ate, as they used to go right away and eat, but now they eat a bit, leave and come back. However, there haven't been any issues with this. Emma is hard to recognize symptoms of low or high sugars in. As my vet says, Emma only shows when she is 'really sick'. She throws up weekly, but sugars still ok but go up and down a bit. We went away for 17 days in July and trained a family member to give injections. First time we ever left them. they did great. We just went away for 10 days last week and on day 7, Emma died. I am devastated over it. Our family says they were alert and Emma was sitting with her feet tucked under her. Food was gone, but he had not seen them finish it each as like I mentioned, they take longer to eat now and go back and forth. There had been some small vomiting earlier in the week, which we often see and associate with higher sugars. When he found Emma, he called immediately and we started to treat as hypoglecemic and got him to rub syrup on gums. Some response in twitching etc. Rushed her to emerg. Tried for an hour, but dehydrated, low body temp, dilated ey Continue reading >>

Diabetes In Cats

Diabetes In Cats

This article is about diabetes mellitus in cats. For other uses, see Diabetes (disambiguation). Diabetes mellitus is a chronic disease in cats, whereby either insufficient insulin response or insulin resistance lead to persistently high blood glucose concentrations. Diabetes could affect up to 1 in 230 cats,[1] and may be becoming increasingly common. Diabetes mellitus is less common in cats than in dogs. 80-95% of diabetic cats experience something similar to type-2 diabetes, but are generally severely insulin-dependent by the time symptoms are diagnosed. The condition is treatable, and treated properly, the cat can experience a normal life expectancy. In type-2 cats, prompt effective treatment may lead to diabetic remission, in which the cat no longer needs injected insulin. Untreated, the condition leads to increasingly weak legs in cats, and eventually malnutrition, ketoacidosis and/or dehydration, and death. Symptoms[edit] Cats will generally show a gradual onset of the disease over a few weeks or months, and it may escape notice for even longer.[citation needed] The first outward symptoms are a sudden weight loss (or occasionally gain), accompanied by excessive drinking and urination; for example, cats can appear to develop an obsession with water and lurk around faucets or water bowls. Appetite is suddenly either ravenous (up to three-times normal) or absent. These symptoms arise from the body being unable to use glucose as an energy source. A fasting glucose blood test will normally be suggestive of diabetes at this point. The same home blood test monitors used in humans are used on cats, usually by obtaining blood from the ear edges or paw pads. As the disease progresses, ketone bodies will be present in the urine, which can be detected with the same urine stri Continue reading >>

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

Feeding Tips For A Cat With Diabetes

When Randy Frostig took his cat, Bill, to the veterinarian six years ago, he was seriously worried. “He was lethargic and he wasn’t eating, and his urine was sticking to his paws,” Frostig recalls. The diagnosis -- diabetes -- surprised Frostig. “I didn’t even know that a cat could have diabetes. I didn’t know what it meant,” he says. He was concerned about having to give his cat regular shots of insulin, and how the disease might affect his pet’s life. In reality, a diagnosis of feline diabetes is not a death sentence, and caring for a cat with the disease is far easier than Frostig had envisioned. “Giving him insulin is like brushing your teeth. It’s no big deal,” he says. Thanks to regular doses of insulin and a special diet, the gray tabby started acting more like his old self. “He was running around, and he gained his appetite again.” Why Do Cats Get Diabetes? Cats aren’t so different from people when it comes to diabetes. The disease affects insulin -- a hormone that helps the body move sugar (glucose) from the bloodstream into the cells. Feline diabetes tends to more closely resemble type 2 diabetes in humans, in which the body makes insulin but becomes less sensitive to the hormone. Sugar builds up in the bloodstream, leading to symptoms like increased urination and thirst. If it’s left untreated, eventually diabetes can lead to life-threatening complications. Although the exact cause of feline diabetes isn’t known, it’s more likely to affect overweight cats, because obesity makes the cat’s body less sensitive to the effects of insulin. Diabetes is also more common in older cats. Diseases like chronic pancreatitis and hyperthyroidism, as well as medications such as corticosteroids, may also make cats more prone to develop diab Continue reading >>

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Preventing And Handling Diabetic Emergencies

Caring for a pet with diabetes can be daunting. Fortunately, the key to successful diabetes management is simple: a consistent, established daily routine. A healthy diet is essential, and feeding your pet the same amount of food at the same time every day will help make blood sugar easiest to control. Your pet will usually also need twice-daily insulin injections, which should be given at the same time every day. (The easiest way to do this is to coordinate shots with mealtimes.) Routine daily exercise and regular at-home monitoring of urine and/or blood sugar round out a plan for good diabetic regulation. Even if you are following a consistent routine, a diabetic pet may occasionally experience an emergency. A number of different things can cause an emergency, but the most common is hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar. In this case, it is important that you be prepared in order to avoid a life-threatening situation. Hypoglycemia: Why It Happens Hypoglycemia most often results from accidental overdosage of insulin, but it can also occur if a pet is not eating well, misses a meal or vomits after eating, or if the type and amount of food he is being fed changes. Hypoglycemia may become a problem with very vigorous exercise; for this reason, regular daily controlled exercise is best. Hypoglycemia can also result if the body’s need for insulin changes. This scenario is particularly common in cats who often return to a non-diabetic state once an appropriate diet and insulin therapy start. Vet Tips Avoid “double-dosing” insulin. Only one person in a household should have the responsibility of giving insulin. A daily log should be kept of the time/amount of food and insulin that is given to avoid errors. Proper daily monitoring of blood and/or urine glucose can help identif Continue reading >>

Feline Diabetes Mellitus

Feline Diabetes Mellitus

Diabetes mellitus is a hormonal disease that occurs in about 1 out of every 400 cats. It is characterised by elevated blood glucose (blood sugar) levels. If untreated, it can lead to life-threatening metabolic disturbances. Diabetes in cats is most similar to type II or adult onset diabetes in humans. The hormone insulin is produced in the pancreas and is responsible for allowing glucose to be taken into cells to provide energy. If there is resistance to this action or there is a reduction in the total amount of insulin produced, then the cat becomes diabetic. The cats who are most at risk for developing diabetes are cats over eight years old, male cats, Burmese cats and cats who are overweight. Signs and Symptoms Clinical signs of diabetes include: excessive drinking excessive urinating increased appetite problems walking or jumping. (This is caused by neuropathy which causes poor nervous control to the cat’s hind legs) Diagnosis Diagnosis involves blood and urine tests to demonstrate high blood glucose and the presence of glucose in the urine. Sometimes a test for fructosamine is required to distinguish between cats which are stressed and those that are truly diabetic. Treatment Diabetes is a very treatable disease, but requires long term commitment. Treatment options include: treating underlying disease (if there is one) insulin therapy (the preferred method, and the one that provides the best control of blood sugar) dietary management (there have been significant advances in dietary treatment of feline diabetes recently) After your cat has been diagnosed with diabetes, the next step is to determine the correct type and dose of insulin for her. This varies from cat to cat, and your cat will probably have to spend several days in the hospital. She will have her bloo Continue reading >>

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