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Side Effects Of Taking Insulin

Mortality And Treatment Side-effects During Long-term Intensified Conventional Insulin Treatment In The Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study.

Mortality And Treatment Side-effects During Long-term Intensified Conventional Insulin Treatment In The Stockholm Diabetes Intervention Study.

Abstract Altogether, 102 patients were randomized to intensified conventional treatment (ICT) (n = 48) or standard treatment (ST) (n = 54). After 7.5 years, 89 patients remained, and it was shown that microangiopathy was retarded by the lower blood glucose concentrations seen in the patients in the ICT group. HbA1c was reduced from (means +/- SE) 9.5 +/- 0.2% to 7.1 +/- 0.1% in the ICT group and from 9.4 +/- 0.2% to 8.5 +/- 0.1% in the ST group (P < 0.001). Of the patients, 4 in the ICT group and 3 in the ST group died. Mortality was predicted by albuminuria, the amplitude of the sural nerve action potential, and the test of arm blood flow during contraction of the contralateral hand (sympathetic nerve function) at baseline (P < 0.05). Weight increased by 4.4 +/- 1.1 kg in the ICT group and 1.8 +/- 0.7 kg in the ST group (P = 0.05). Atherosclerosis, measured with digital pulse plethysmography, was approximately the same in the groups at baseline and after five years. In each group, 3 patients had myocardial infarctions, and 2 from each group had ketoacidosis once. There was a mean of 1.1 episodes per patient and per year of serious hypoglycemia in the ICT group and 0.4 episodes per patient and per year in the ST group. No adverse incidents or accidents were observed in either group, and there were no differences between the groups with regard to cognitive function measured with a battery of tests.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS). Continue reading >>

Insulin And Coumadin: Side Effects

Insulin And Coumadin: Side Effects

Patient safety: What you need to know if you take insulin or Coumadin. If you or a loved one has been prescribed Coumadin or insulin, it’s important to be educated about these powerful drugs. And that’s why Mercy Home Health is here to help. Coumadin is a type of blood thinner given to select patients who have heart arrhythmias, a history of blood clots, or are at risk for a blood clot following surgery. As with any blood thinner, the risk is a patient’s blood can become too thin, which can be life threatening, explains Donna Raziano, MD, MBA, FACP, chief medical officer of Mercy Home Health and Mercy LIFE. A second high-risk medication is insulin, given to type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Prescribed insulin is very similar to the natural insulin produced by your own body and it can be extremely effective in treating high blood sugar. However, the No. 1 side effect of taking insulin is the risk of low blood sugar. When a patient’s blood sugar falls below a certain level, it can result in diabetic shock. “Generally, the amount of insulin your doctor prescribes will be good for you,” explains Raziano. “But one day you don’t feel well – you skip breakfast and lunch, but still take your insulin. That’s when your blood sugar can go dangerously low.” When someone is prescribed either of these drugs, Mercy Home Health nurses carefully explain the medication and explain the importance of monitoring. “Mercy Home Health nurses love educating patients,” says Raziano. “It’s an important job to keep patients safe.” If you take Coumadin: Talk to your doctor: Make sure you are prescribed the appropriate amount Tell your doctor if you have a history of falls or are falling more recently Get your blood tested frequently; If you are new to Coumadin or were jus Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Injection For Diabetics?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Injection For Diabetics?

Generally, no side effects occur. One possibility is Hypoglycemia, when you delay or miss a meal or may be due to switching to a new type of insulin. That's why insulin treatment requires careful attention to the timing of meals. If you're taking insulin, you'll also need to test your blood glucose at home, perhaps several times a day, to know the best doses of insulin(your doctor tells you the dosage) that will keep your blood glucose low, but not so low that you have episodes of hypoglycemia. But in some (rare) cases, mild allergic reactions such as swelling, itching or redness around the injection site, is seen. Some reactions may pose a severe risk. Experts advise diabetics to consult their GPs, because if you are on other medications some drugs may interact with insulin. Sustained nausea and vomiting may also are the signs of insulin allergy. Continue reading >>

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

The Side Effects Of Insulin In Dogs

Diabetes mellitus develops when your dog's body loses its ability to produce insulin on its own. Insulin therapy, administered through injections underneath your dog's skin, is widely used to help your diabetic dog regulate its blood glucose. As essential as insulin is to a diabetic dog, it carries with it a number of side effects. These side effects are potentially life-threatening and should be reported to a veterinarian immediately. Food is broken down by your dog's body into separate organic compounds; glucose is one of these. Glucose, an energy source for movement, growth and other functions, needs the hormone insulin to transfer from the bloodstream into individual cells. The pancreas produces insulin and, in a healthy dog, produces and releases enough insulin to match the amount of glucose in the bloodstream. However, when a dog develops diabetes mellitus, his owner must administer insulin to him through subcutaneous (underneath the skin) injections to maintain the body's proper blood glucose/insulin balance. Hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) is the most common side effect associated with insulin. It is an extremely serious medical condition that comes on suddenly, requiring immediate attention. Before taking your dog to your veterinarian, it is critical that you immediately feed her approximately 1 tbsp. of a fast-acting glucose, such as corn syrup or honey, first by rubbing a small amount on your dog's gums and then feeding her by mouth when she regains her swallowing functions. An insulin overdose, missed morning meal or overexertion can trigger low blood sugar. Symptoms include hunger, lethargy and sleepiness in the early stages, followed by staggering gait, then twitching, convulsions, coma and death. Certain medications, such as corticosteroids, propranolol, t Continue reading >>

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Adverse effects and allergic reactions to insulin are possible. Here's what you should know if you take insulin to control your diabetes. If you have diabetes your body has an insulin problem. In people without diabetes, insulin is a naturally-occurring hormone but in type 2s who do not use it efficiently or who have type 1 and don't produce it, insulin must be injected. Insulin is made in a variety of forms (from rapid acting to long acting, etc) using a few different methods—through genetic engineering since 1982; withdrawn from the pancreas of deceased pigs or cows prior to that. Today there are more than 20 different types of insulin available in the United States. You may think you don't need to worry about side effects with insulin as it's a "natural" substance but when used to help control diabetes and blood glucose levels it's essentially a medication. And, as with all medications, side effects (or adverse events) are possible but do not occur in everyone. (If you feel brave and want to know more, read the prescribing information that accompanies your insulin.) It's important to note that while most people who use insulin do not experience significant side effects, you should be aware of the potential complications, just in case they occur. Insulin-Related Hypoglycemia and Hypersensitivity The most common side effect is hypoglycemia; the most-rare side effect is hypersensitivity or allergy. How can injecting insulin cause hypoglycemia (low blood sugar) to happen? Insulin’s job is to essentially escort the sugar from the bloodstream into our brain, muscles, and nerves. It thinks of nothing else, even if there is not enough sugar in the bloodstream to take. Meaning that if someone injects too much insulin, it will take too much sugar from the bloodstream, lead Continue reading >>

Will Taking Insulin Cause Complications?

Will Taking Insulin Cause Complications?

Great question! Thanks for asking. In many areas of the country it’s widely believed that the very worst of diabetes complications are caused by insulin. People remember their grandparents being put on insulin then going blind, suffering kidney failure, amputations, and even death. No wonder many families are terrified of insulin! But here’s the deal, no you-know-what, insulin is the safest diabetes medication on the planet. After all, it is something that belongs in your body in the first place. So why does it have such a bad reputation? Is modern insulin different than old-time insulin? Actually, it is a bit different, but not by much. The truth is that we in medicine have to take much of the blame for insulin’s bad name. In times past there was a much greater emphasis in diabetes care on various diets. To keep their patients motivated and focused on these difficult diets, many doctors in the past used the threat of insulin as a form of negative reinforcement. “Follow my directions or I’ll put you on the needle!” nonsense. This was bad medicine in many different respects. First off, diabetes is a chronic, progressive illness. That means it never goes away and it gets a little worse over time, no matter how well you take care of yourself. If you have diabetes long enough, and don’t get run over by a truck, you will need insulin. So now we can see the first error, using something that is inevitable as a threat is a bad battle plan. Past patients who tried their best, but failed to the inevitable, then felt miss-placed guilt. The more serious outcome of this misguided approach, however, is that it caused insulin to be started too late in the course of the disease. Grandpa didn’t die because he was put on insulin. Grandpa died because he was not put on ins Continue reading >>

Does Insulin Have Health Risks?

Does Insulin Have Health Risks?

If your doctor has prescribed insulin as a diabetes treatment, here's what to know about avoiding low blood sugar, weight gain, and other potential complications. Faced with the prospect of daily insulin injections, you may be more worried about needles and syringes than potential health risks of this diabetes treatment. In fact, insulin has been so finely tuned that health risks, side effects, and complications from insulin therapy for people with type 2 diabetes are fewer than ever before. That doesn’t mean problems don’t exist, but most are easily overcome with proper education, close communication with your doctor, and following his or her directions. Here are some potential side effects of insulin therapy that you should know about: Low Blood Sugar (Hypoglycemia) Low blood sugar is the most serious complication associated with insulin. Also referred to as insulin reaction, it occurs when your blood sugar drops below a certain level. If your insulin dose is too high or is delivered too quickly, your blood sugar level may drop so low that it can impair brain function. In the most severe and untreated cases, low blood sugar can cause you to have a seizure, pass out, or even go into a coma. Signs and symptoms of low blood sugar include feeling weak, drowsy, or dizzy, experiencing shakiness, confusion, anxiety, nausea, or headache, blurred vision, and sometimes a loss of consciousness. Although not always possible to do, the only way to know for certain if you're experiencing low blood sugar is to test your blood sugar level — a reading under 70 mg/dl often indicates hypoglycemia. Some people can dip to that level without any signs or symptoms, especially if they've had diabetes for a long time. If you test and see low blood sugar numbers yet feel no effects, talk Continue reading >>

Insulin During Pregnancy - Uses & Side Effects You Should Be Aware Of

Insulin During Pregnancy - Uses & Side Effects You Should Be Aware Of

Are you worried about your insulin levels during pregnancy? Have you heard of gestational diabetes? Well, if you are anxious and clueless reading this article may be a good idea. During pregnancy, your doctor may keep a tab on various health parameters including blood sugar levels. Has your doctor prescribed you insulin but you’re not sure about its safety, especially during your pregnancy? Fret not! The post will tell you about the insulin use during pregnancy and its effects. Read on to know all about it and keep your worries at bay. What Is Insulin? Insulin is a hormone that helps your body absorb glucose from the blood. Your liver and muscles store the glucose in the form of glycogen. It prevents your body from using up fat as a source of energy. When the amount of insulin in your blood is very less, your body cells are not able to use the stored glucose. In such a situation, your body starts using up the fat as a source of energy. Over time, the glucose keeps accumulating inside your body and your blood sugar levels may rise steadily. What Is Gestational Diabetes? When you are pregnant, your body goes through certain hormonal changes. It may cause gestational diabetes in many women. There are certain hormones in your placenta (1) that can cause insulin resistance (2), a condition that interferes with the way insulin regulates the glucose levels in your body. Your placenta will grow as the pregnancy progresses. As a result, it will produce more hormones and increase your insulin resistance. Am I At Risk Of Developing Gestational Diabetes? Here are some of the factors that may increase your risk of developing gestational diabetes (3). Do speak to your doctor about any other tests that you may need to undergo. If you were overweight before you became pregnant. If yo Continue reading >>

Common Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

Common Side Effects Of Diabetes Medications

You, along with most people who have diabetes, probably take some form of medication to help manage the disease. But diabetes doesn't come in just one form, and the type of diabetes you have, as well as your unique symptoms and health profile, will ultimately dictate the types of medicines you'll need to take. Unfortunately, taking these drugs may cause a number of uncomfortable side effects. Here is a brief overview of the leading medications that are available for diabetes and their associated side effects. Remember, you may not experience these side effects. Type 1 diabetes Insulin. If you have type 1 diabetes, you must take insulin to regulate your blood sugar. According to Diabetes.co.uk, there are no real side effects associated with taking insulin, but they do happen, mostly in the form of an allergic reaction. Should this occur, it's important to seek medical attention immediately. Increasingly, doctors are also prescribing insulin for people with type 2 diabetes. High blood pressure medications. Because diabetes increases the risk of cardiovascular problems, those with type 1 diabetes may also be prescribed beta blockers, angiotensin II receptor blockers, or angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. All of these are common drugs to help treat high blood pressure. Side effects vary depending on the medications, but typically someone taking these meds may experience slight dizziness, lightheadedness, and irregular heartbeats. Aspirin. This medication is often recommended by doctors to those with diabetes. The American Diabetes Association wrote that when taken in low doses, aspirin can help reduce the risk of heart attack in people with diabetes. Some of the more common side effects of this medication are nausea and an upset stomach. Although aspirin is sold with Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

What Are The Side Effects Of Insulin Shots?

Insulin is at the center of the diabetes problem. In people with type 2 diabetes, the body does not use insulin effectively. The pancreas compensates by overproducing insulin, and in time, it simply cannot keep up with the demands of the body to keep glucose levels down. To provide enough insulin to the body to manage blood glucose levels, many diabetics are advised to take insulin shots. The insulin in these injections is a chemical that is produced artificially to resemble the insulin made in our pancreas. This insulin works just like natural insulin by escorting sugar from our blood into our cells. Type 2 diabetics deal with a condition known as insulin resistance. It is a phenomenon where cells aren’t sensitive to the action of insulin (escorting blood glucose into cells) and hence, do not respond to it. This leads to the accumulation of glucose in the blood and is called hyperglycemia. Supplemental insulin given to Type 2 diabetics helps the body ‘muscle’ sugar out of the bloodstream and into cells. Insulin injections are used to regulate blood sugar differently for the different diabetes-types: For people who have type 1 diabetes – Their bodies cannot make insulin and therefore they aren’t able to regulate the amount of glucose in their bloodstream. For people who have type 2 diabetes – Their bodies aren’t able to produce enough insulin, or use it effectively. The insulin shots are used because the blood sugar cannot be regulated with oral medications alone. They also stop the liver from producing more sugar. Every type of insulin available in a drug store works in this way. They, mainly, differ in two ways – How quickly they begin to work For how long they can regulate blood sugar levels Mechanism of Action Regulating the process in which glucose Continue reading >>

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

Lantus (insulin Glargine) Side Effects

What Is Lantus (Insulin Glargine)? Lantus is the brand name of insulin glargine, a long-acting insulin used to treat adults and children with type 1 diabetes mellitus and adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus to control high blood sugar. Lantus replaces the insulin that your body no longer produces. Insulin is a natural substance that allows your body to convert dietary sugar into energy and helps store energy for later use. In type 2 diabetes mellitus, your body does not produce enough insulin, or the insulin produced is not used properly, causing a rise in blood sugar. Like other types of insulin, Lantus is used to normalize blood sugar levels. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual dysfunction. Proper control of diabetes has also been shown to reduce your risk of a heart attack or stroke. Lantus is meant to be used alongside a proper diet and exercise program recommended by your doctor. Lantus is manufactured by Sanofi-Aventis. It was approved for use by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2000 as the first long-acting human insulin administered once a day with a 24-hour sugar-lowering effect. Lantus Warnings You will be taught how to properly inject this medication since that is the only way to use it. Do not inject cold insulin because this can be painful. Always wash your hands before measuring and injecting insulin. Lantus is always clear and colorless; look for cloudy solution or clumps in the container before injecting it. Do not use Lantus to treat diabetic ketoacidosis. A short-acting insulin is used to treat this condition. It is recommended that you take a diabetes education program to learn more about diabetes and how to manage it. Other medical problems may affect the use of this Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

Type 2 Diabetes And Insulin

People with type 2 diabetes do not always have to take insulin right away; that is more common in people with type 1 diabetes. The longer someone has type 2 diabetes, the more likely they will require insulin. Just as in type 1 diabetes, insulin is a way to control your blood glucose level. With type 2 diabetes, though, dietary changes, increasing physical activity, and some oral medications are usually enough to bring your blood glucose to a normal level. To learn about how the hormone insulin works, we have an article that explains the role of insulin. There are several reasons people with type 2 diabetes may want to use insulin: It can quickly bring your blood glucose level down to a healthier range. If your blood glucose level is excessively high when you are diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, the doctor may have you use insulin to lower your blood glucose level—in a way that’s much faster than diet and exercise. Insulin will give your body a respite; it (and especially the beta cells that produce insulin) has been working overtime to try to bring down your blood glucose level. In this scenario, you’d also watch what you eat and exercise, but having your blood glucose under better control may make it easier to adjust to those lifestyle changes. It has fewer side effects than some of the medications: Insulin is a synthetic version of a hormone our bodies produce. Therefore, it interacts with your body in a more natural way than medications do, leading to fewer side effects. The one side effect is hypoglycemia. It can be cheaper. Diabetes medications can be expensive, although there is an array of options that try to cater to people of all economic levels. However, insulin is generally cheaper than medications (on a monthly basis), especially if the doctor wants yo Continue reading >>

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Insulin Regular Human Solution

Uses Insulin regular is used with a proper diet and exercise program to control high blood sugar in people with diabetes. Controlling high blood sugar helps prevent kidney damage, blindness, nerve problems, loss of limbs, and sexual function problems. Proper control of diabetes may also lessen your risk of a heart attack or stroke. This man-made insulin product is the same as human insulin. It replaces the insulin that your body would normally make. It is a short-acting insulin. It works by helping blood sugar (glucose) get into cells so your body can use it for energy. This medication is usually used in combination with a medium- or long-acting insulin product. This medication may also be used alone or with other oral diabetes drugs (such as metformin). How to use Insulin Regular Human Solution Read the Patient Information Leaflet provided by your pharmacist before you start using this medication and each time you get a refill. If you have any questions, ask your doctor, diabetes educator, or pharmacist. Learn all preparation and usage instructions from your health care professional and the product package. Before using, check this product visually for particles or discoloration. If either is present, do not use the insulin. Insulin regular should be clear and colorless. Before injecting each dose, clean the injection site with rubbing alcohol. Change the injection site each time to lessen injury under the skin and to avoid developing problems under the skin (lipodystrophy). Insulin regular may be injected in the stomach area, the thigh, the buttocks, or the back of the upper arm. Do not inject into a vein or muscle because very low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) may occur. Do not rub the area after the injection. Do not inject into skin that is red, swollen, or itchy. Do Continue reading >>

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Tweet If you have recently been prescribed insulin, or have switched to a new type of insulin, you may be concerned about the side effects. You might also be experiencing side effects and not know where they are coming from. Similarly, you may be looking for information for a friend or family member. What are the side effects of insulin? Insulin side effects amongst diabetics are rare, but when they do occur, allergic reactions can be severe and can pose a significant risk to health. What do I do if I have an adverse reaction to my insulin? If you experience mild allergic reactions such as swelling, itching or redness around the injection site, experts advise diabetics to consult their GPs. Similarly, sustained nausea and vomiting are signs of insulin allergy. How do I know if my insulin is working? When taking insulin, diabetics are advised by experts to regularly check blood glucose levels using testing kits. If blood glucose tests show fluctuating or above-average blood sugar levels, diabetes is not being properly controlled and insulin is not working. Avoiding infection when taking insulin When taking insulin, try to avoid infection by using disposable needles and syringes, and sterilising any reusable equipment. Do some drugs interact with insulin? Some drugs are known to interact with insulin, and diabetics should be aware of this list. Your GP or physician should provide detailed information of how any extra drug affects insulin. Some medications that are known to influence insulin are shown below, but diabetics should consult their GP for further information: Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insuli Continue reading >>

Insulin Side Effects

Insulin Side Effects

Adverse Effects of Insulin People taking insulin are susceptible to hypoglycemia when they administer too much insulin, delay or miss a meal, exercise without first eating a snack, or drink alcohol on an empty stomach. That's why insulin treatment requires careful attention to the timing of meals, exercise, and alcohol intake. If you're taking insulin, you'll also need to test your blood glucose at home, perhaps several times a day. Your doctor will also perform periodic HbA1c tests to check your overall glucose control and to help you find the best doses of insulin that will keep your blood glucose low, but not so low that you have episodes of hypoglycemia. Other adverse effects of insulin include loss or overgrowth of fat tissue at injection sites, allergic reactions, and insulin resistance. If you inject in the same area over and over again, you may develop fat deposits there, which reduce insulin absorption. This effect is less common with the types of insulin used today, and you can prevent it by rotating injection sites. Allergic reactions are also less common with the newer insulins. If you suffer reactions, you can be treated with a desensitization procedure that involves starting with injections of small doses of insulin and gradually increasing to higher doses. Insulin resistance, which may be caused by the formation of antibodies against insulin, is usually managed by increasing the insulin dose. Publication Review By: Written by: Christopher D. Saudek, M.D.; Simeon Margolis, M.D., Ph.D. Last Modified: 03 Apr 2013 Continue reading >>

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