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Should Insulin Be Kept In Fridge

Should Eggs Be Kept In The Fridge? Will They Lose Their Freshness If Not In The Fridge?

Should Eggs Be Kept In The Fridge? Will They Lose Their Freshness If Not In The Fridge?

If the eggs have been washed (as in the US) — they MUST be refrigerated — required by law. If the eggs have NOT been washed (as in the UK) — they should NOT be refrigerated — prohibited by law. Regarding freshness. If left to her own devices, a hen will lay about 18 eggs (one a day) before deciding she has enough to raise a brood. The first egg is 18 days old by the time she starts sitting on them. From the time she starts sitting on them until they hatch is another 21 days. They will all hatch within a few hours of each other. At that point, the oldest egg is 39 days old. With the exception of maybe one or possibly two, all of the eggs will hatch. The eggs remained fresh, although unrefrigerated, for over a month. If you live in a country where the eggs are not washed, then don’t refrigerate them. They should remain fresh for 10 days or up to 2 weeks. If you live in a country where the eggs are washed, keep them in the refrigerator. They should remain fresh for 10 days or up to 2 weeks. Continue reading >>

How To Store Insulin

How To Store Insulin

Insulin is measured in units. Most bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin sold in the United States have 100 units of insulin per milliliter of fluid and are labeled U-100. Different strengths, like U-500, also are available in the U.S. Different strengths are used in other countries. It's important to know the type of insulin you take and whether it should appear cloudy or clear. When you prepare to use a bottle, cartridge, or pen, check the insulin: NPH should look uniformly cloudy after you gently roll the bottle or pen. All other insulin should look clear. If your insulin doesn't look right, don't use it. Take it back to your pharmacy. Don't shake your insulin. Gently roll it. Don't toss it around or handle it roughly. If you don't handle your insulin correctly, it's more likely to clump or frost. Don't use the insulin if you can see clumps after you gently roll the bottle or pen, or if the sides look frosted. Storage Guidelines Take steps to store your insulin correctly, or it might not work. Keep your insulin away from heat and light. Any insulin that you don't store in the refrigerator should be kept as cool as possible (between 56°F and 80°F.) Never let your insulin freeze. If your insulin freezes, don't use it, even after it's thawed. Keep unused bottles, cartridges, and pens of insulin in the refrigerator (between 36°F and 46°F). If stored properly, these will be good until the expiration date listed on the insulin. Keep insulin cartridges and pens that you're currently using at room temperature (between 56°F and 80°F.) Expiration Guidelines An open insulin bottle, cartridge, or pen is only good for a limited time. Follow these guidelines for discarding insulin: Glargine (Lantus): Discard opened bottles, pens, and cartridges 28 days after you've starte Continue reading >>

Which Kinds Of Vegetables Should Be Kept In Fridge?

Which Kinds Of Vegetables Should Be Kept In Fridge?

I agree with most of Matthew's list. My exceptions are that I do refrigerate zucchini and artichokes. I'd also clarify that once a pineapple (or any fruit or vegetable) has been cut open, the remaining part should be refrigerated. Onions, garlic, ginger, potatoes (regular and sweet), and any other root vegetable such as celery root, rutabagas, and turnips should be stored in a dark dry place (a drawer is ideal) to ensure the longest life. Other things that should not be refrigerated: Tomatoes (they will break down and lose their flavor) Fresh herbs (they keep best wrapped in a slightly damp paper towel) Other things that should be refrigerated: Bell peppers Hot peppers/chiles Cucumber Fresh fruit and vegetables release a 'ripening' gas called ethylene gas. It's nature's way of ripening off the plant and a necessary part of the ultimate decomposition of the food. Different fruits and vegetables release different amounts as they age. Bananas are notorious for ethylene release - some people put unripe fruit, such as avocados, in a bag with bananas to make them ripen more quickly. This is an incomplete list of vegetables that don't require refrigeration for short-term preservation: Beetroot Swede Taro Eggplant Garlic Ginger Persimmons Pineapple Pumpkin Onions Potatoes Pumpkins Sweet potato Zucchini Artichoke This is a incomplete list of vegetables that do require refrigeration for short-term preservation: Asparagus Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cabbage Carrots (in a plastic container) Cauliflower (wrapped in plastic) Celery (in plastic) Corn Green beans Leeks Lettuce (in a plastic container) Mushrooms (in a paper bag) Raspberries Spinach Continue reading >>

How Important Is It That My Insulin Is Kept In The Fridge?

How Important Is It That My Insulin Is Kept In The Fridge?

You know you shouldn't allow your insulin freeze by putting it too close to your freezing compartment, since this will make insulin not effective anymore, a big risk! As for keeping your spare insulin in a fridge, all insulin manufacturers guarantees insulin being effective after being kept at a tropic temperature ± 30˚Centigrade for one month, but one of my best friends and ex-patient has now many times experienced that during a stay in SE Asia (day time temperature around 35˚ Centigrade) after a short time outside the fridge his insulin won't work anymore, so needs to buy new penfills, quite expensive if one - like he is - is on a synthetic long acting insulin, in his case costing € 52,50 (≈US$ 64,-) for 5 penfills of 3ml = 300 IU each,. Continue reading >>

Storage Of Unopened Insulin:

Storage Of Unopened Insulin:

Insulin is very sensitive to sunlight, indoor lights, and to extremely hot or cold temperature. Insulin is not OK to use if exposed to very hot or cold weather. The three drug manufacturers of insulin in the United States say UNOPENED insulin is best stored inside the fridge [2° to 8°Celcius (36° to 46°Fahrenheit)]. UNOPENED insulin stored in the refrigerator is good until the expiration date printed on the insulin box. The expiration date will usually be 1 year from the date of purchase but you have to check the box to find out. Storage of OPENED insulin: Once open there are different storage needs for insulin. What does OPEN mean? This does NOT mean removed from the box. OPEN means the insulin cap is removed and the rubber stopper was punctured. Vials and pens have different needs for storage. These differences can lead to confusion. Therefore, it is very important for you to become familiar with the recommendations for the insulin product that you use. What is an OPEN vial? Vial: Once the vial is punctured, it is OPEN. Once you stick a needle in the vial, it is OPEN. OPEN vials can be stored in the fridge or at CONTROLLED room temperature. Regardless of where it is stored, OPEN insulin will only last 28 days before it must be thrown in the trash. Insulin kept in the fridge should be removed and allowed to reach room temperature before injection. PEN: Once used for the first time, insulin pens should not be stored in the fridge. Instead, they should be stored at CONTROLLED room temperature. The number of days you can use the pen will depend on which pen you use. Talk to your doctor or pharmacist. Pens last 7-28 days if stored at CONTROLLED room temperature. The number of days depends on which pen you use. PUMP: Once 6 IMPORTANT Storage tips for all insulin: Do not Continue reading >>

Should Eggs Be Stored In The Fridge Or Not? What Science Supports This?

Should Eggs Be Stored In The Fridge Or Not? What Science Supports This?

Broadly, the best [safest] way to store shelled eggs is refrigerated, and the science that supports this is microbiology. Refrigerating eggs at or below 4°C (40°F) slows down most bacterial growth* and reduces the risk of illness and death caused by salmonella**. On average one out of every 20,000 chicken eggs contains salmonella. Of those fewer eggs, the level of bacteria totals between two and five micoorganisms each when laid. While it takes approximately 100 micoorganisms to make a person sick, multiplication of this bacteria happens relatively fast if the eggs aren't cooled quickly***. Kevin Keener, an associate professor of food science at Purdue University, outlines the rate at which salmonella can multiply (also pictured above with a rapid egg cooling system that he developed in 2010). Salmonella doubles every 20 minutes under ideal conditions … When sitting there for an hour, two could become 32. At two hours, there would be 1,000 organisms. At eight hours, it would be in the range of millions. In one egg. John Ingraham, a microbiologist and a chicken owner shares similar views while alluding to the idea that it's really how you cook the egg that will determine how safe it is****. ... Chickens are notoriously susceptible to infection with salmonella. And if the chicken that's laying the egg is infected with salmonella, it's likely its eggs will be infected, too. That's why we're told to cook eggs and keep them cold — cooking kills the bacteria and cool temperatures slows microbial growth and helps the eggs last longer. As User commented on the question, the US Food and Drug Administration requires all cartons of shell eggs that have not been treated to destroy salmonella to carry the following safe handling statement*****: To prevent illness from bacteria Continue reading >>

Should Raw Nuts Be Kept In The Freezer Or The Fridge?

Should Raw Nuts Be Kept In The Freezer Or The Fridge?

Keeping them in the refrigerator will make them last longer than at room temperature, and freezing them will make them last even longer, just as long as both are kept in air-tight packaging. Since oxidative rancidity would be your primary spoilage factor, the less oxygen and light they are exposed to, the better. Vacuum packed would even be better. Continue reading >>

Is It True That Spirits Should Not Be Kept In The Fridge?

Is It True That Spirits Should Not Be Kept In The Fridge?

Assuming that they are sealed tightly with screw top caps, I don't see why this would be a problem. Spirits have alcohol which will dissipate more readily with higher temperatures - some may need to come to room temperature for fullest flavor and aroma availability however you wouldn't want to store any spirits in the fridge with gas permeable caps (like cork) because they can acquire the “off” flavors that are often present Ie: onion garlic fish etc… my parents stored their suppositories in there so you can store your rum in there too!!! Continue reading >>

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