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Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

In Women With Gestational Diabetes, Exercise Lowers Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Women who have gestational diabetes — a type of diabetes that occurs during pregnancy and usually ends after the baby's delivery — can lower their risk of later developing type 2 diabetes by starting up an exercise routine, a new study has found. Having gestational diabetes may provide an opportunity for patients to recognize their increased risk of type 2 diabetes and take steps to prevent it, the researchers said. In the study, the researchers looked at more than 4,500 women who had gestational diabetes in the past, and followed them from 1991 to 2007, to examine whether increasing physical activity and reducing sedentary behaviors (such as watching TV) lowered their risk of developing type 2 diabetes. By the end of the study period, 635 women had developed type 2 diabetes. The researchers found that women who increased their activity level so they were moderately exercising for 150 minutes weekly (or 75 minutes of vigorous exercise) had a 47 percent lower risk of developing type 2 diabetes, compared with women who didn't change their activity levels. Conversely, the more time women spent watching TV, the higher their risk of type 2 diabetes was, according to the study, published today (May 19) in the journal JAMA Internal Medicine. [9 Healthy Habits You Can Do in 1 Minute (Or Less)] "These findings suggest a hopeful message to women with a history of gestational diabetes, although they are at exceptionally high risk of type 2 diabetes: Promoting an active lifestyle may lower the risk," the researchers wrote in their study. Gestational diabetes is somewhat common: The condition occurs in about 2 to 10 percent of pregnancies. It is also a sign of higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes later in life — women who have had gestational diabetes have a 35 to 60 per Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes

Perhaps you have learned that you have a high chance of developing type 2 diabetes, the most common type of diabetes. You might be overweight or have a parent, brother, or sister with type 2 diabetes. Maybe you had gestational diabetes, which is diabetes that develops during pregnancy. These are just a few examples of factors that can raise your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Diabetes can cause serious health problems, such as heart disease, stroke, and eye and foot problems. Prediabetes also can cause health problems. The good news is that type 2 diabetes can be delayed or even prevented. The longer you have diabetes, the more likely you are to develop health problems, so delaying diabetes by even a few years will benefit your health. You can help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by losing a modest amount of weight by following a reduced-calorie eating plan and being physically active most days of the week. Ask your doctor if you should take the diabetes drug metformin to help prevent or delay type 2 diabetes.1 How can I lower my chances of developing type 2 diabetes? Research such as the Diabetes Prevention Program shows that you can do a lot to reduce your chances of developing type 2 diabetes. Here are some things you can change to lower your risk: Lose weight and keep it off. You may be able to prevent or delay diabetes by losing 5 to 7 percent of your starting weight.1 For instance, if you weigh 200 pounds, your goal would be to lose about 10 to 14 pounds. Move more. Get at least 30 minutes of physical activity 5 days a week. If you have not been active, talk with your health care professional about which activities are best. Start slowly to build up to your goal. Eat healthy foods most of the time. Eat smaller portions to reduce the amount of calories you Continue reading >>

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes In Women With Previous Gestational Diabetes

Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes In Women With Previous Gestational Diabetes

The consequences of hyperglycemia appearing during pregnancy were well described in 1917, when Elliot P. Joslin described Case 309, which “showed sugar in 1897 during pregnancy, but following confinement, with resulting dead baby, it disappeared, but returned in 9 years in the form of moderate to severe diabetes… . [W]ith our present knowledge, it is quite possible that such an outcome could be prevented by active treatment of the glycosuria from the very start” (1). Subsequently, O'Sullivan and Mahan's definition of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in 1964 was a formal recognition of the mother's increased risk of future development of diabetes (2). They defined GDM if a pregnant woman undergoing a 3-h 100-g oral glucose tolerance test had glucose values exceeding 2 SDs above the mean on two of the four values. This landmark study described a population of pregnant women with a lifetime risk of diabetes exceeding 70% (3). Multiple studies worldwide have demonstrated a broad ethnic and geographic distribution of GDM, but all studies share the increased risk of subsequent diabetes after delivery (4). PREVALENCE OF DIABETES AFTER GDM— Assessment of diabetes risk postpartum is influenced by the criteria used to define GDM, the testing undertaken postpartum, and the length of follow-up. Diagnosis of carbohydrate intolerance in the first trimester of pregnancy may reflect the ascertainment of previously undiagnosed and, presumably, asymptomatic diabetes. Alternatively, pregnancy creates a metabolic stress that may push a woman with compensated type 1 or type 2 diabetes into a decompensated hyperglycemic state. Under these circumstances, one would anticipate a high rate of persistent hyperglycemia in the postpartum state. In fact, the presence of GDM doubles the ri Continue reading >>

The Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Type 2

The Link Between Gestational Diabetes And Type 2

If you developed gestational diabetes mellitus (pregnancy-related diabetes) during your pregnancy, then you already know what you need to do to prevent type 2 diabetes: Watch what you eat, stay on top of your blood sugar levels, and get appropriate exercise. “Outcomes for gestational diabetes have improved dramatically because women are very motivated during pregnancy. We just wish they would stay that way after the birth,” says Vivian Fonseca, MD, professor of medicine and pharmacology and chief of the section of endocrinology at Tulane University Health Sciences Center in New Orleans. Gestational Diabetes: What Is It? Gestational diabetes — elevated blood sugar during pregnancy — occurs in pregnant women who have not had diabetes prior to the pregnancy. Doctors do not know what causes gestational diabetes, but they have some theories. Insulin, made by the pancreas, helps regulate the blood sugar levels in the body. When a woman is pregnant, the placenta, which nourishes the baby, also makes hormones that block the mother’s insulin. That makes it tough for the insulin to convert the blood sugar into energy. If the sugar can’t be converted into energy, that sugar gets stored in the blood. And that is the start of gestational diabetes. These high blood sugar levels can cause complications with the pregnancy and put the baby at risk. When a woman is diagnosed, she and her doctor will work hard, focusing on diet, exercise, and weight management, to maintain normal blood sugar levels. Gestational Diabetes: Who’s at Risk? “Weight certainly plays a role, and it’s also genetically determined,” explains Dr. Fonseca. If you are overweight, you have a close relative who had gestational diabetes, or you had gestational diabetes with a previous pregnancy, you ar Continue reading >>

Maternal Health Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

Maternal Health Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes Among Women With Prior Gestational Diabetes Mellitus

1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes is a silent epidemic of increasing proportions, which is coupled with risk factors such as increasing age, obesity, inadequate nutrition, and a sedentary lifestyle [1]. It is one of the most important chronic noncommunicable diseases along with cancer, and cardiovascular and respiratory diseases. The diabetes-related death toll was 3.4 million in 2004, and it will be the seventh cause of death in 2030 [2]. This holds true for both high- and low-resource countries [3], with more than 80% of deaths associated with diabetes occurring in low- and middle-income countries [4]. Urgent steps to stop this epidemic are overdue. Focus should be given to detection and treatment of diabetes, in all its forms—keeping in mind that the prevalence of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) peaks at 15% − 25% in certain populations—and prevention, which starts in utero [5], although the postpartum period is also crucial. Among women diagnosed with GDM there is a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes in the future. This risk was the first outcome measure used to define the hyperglycemia threshold in pregnancy, more than 50 years ago [6]. The cumulative risk of type 2 diabetes after GDM is wide ranging—from 2.5% to as high as 70% at follow-up ranging from 6 weeks to 28 years after delivery [7]. Women with prior GDM constitute a high-risk group, which make them candidates for interventions to reduce the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. This may be a key component for the long-term well-being of women and their offspring—both as children and as adults [8]—as well as for future generations, through in utero environmental modification [9]. The present review discusses the current data on available interventions, and considers the further studies and po Continue reading >>

Is Pharmacologic Intervention Needed To Prevent Type 2 After Gestational Diabetes?

Is Pharmacologic Intervention Needed To Prevent Type 2 After Gestational Diabetes?

Is pharmacologic intervention needed to prevent type 2 after gestational diabetes? Gestational diabetes mellitus was initially defined as having two values on a 100-g oral glucose tolerance test, exceeding two standard deviations above the mean for an unselected population. This definition was validated by the increased morbidity (development of frank diabetes) and mortality in those women meeting the criteria. The high rate of ultimate conversion from this prediabetic state to diabetes emphasizes the difficulty in describing categorical definitions to a continuous variable. Does prediabetes really become diabetes at a fasting glucose of 126 mg/dL? Given the continuous nature of glucose with development of complications, as described by several trials, why wait to begin therapy? The sympathetic observer would say, to avoid stigmatizing the individual with a chronic disease and to avoid the potential side effects of drug therapy. The cynic would respond, because it will cost too much to treat all those individuals with prediabetes. The newest treatment algorithm for the therapy of type 2 diabetes makes a remarkable admission. The ADA and the EASD now recommend drug therapy with metformin at the time of diagnosis of diabetes, in part because of the paucity of data showing durability of lifestyle changes in this population. Furthermore, they recommend acceleration of pharmacologic therapy if HbA1c exceeds 7%. Unfortunately, this latter position perpetuates the treat-to-failure concept long held in diabetes care. Should we not be treating individuals to prevent complications and preserve health? Meta-analyses have shown a 50% increase in the risk of cardiovascular events at two-hour post-glucose load plasma glucose levels of 150 mg/dL. We need to reexamine our categorical Continue reading >>

Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes After Gdm Can Be Reduced

Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes After Gdm Can Be Reduced

Risk of Type 2 Diabetes after GDM Can Be Reduced Gestational Diabetes , Integrative Medicine , T2 Diabetes , Weight Management Women with gestational diabetes mellitus could benefit from medical and lifestyle interventions aimed at reducing the chances of later development of type 2 diabetes mellitus, researchers found. Women with a history of gestational diabetes are at increased risk for type 2 diabetes. However, that risk can be lowered with proper use of preventative medicine and intensive lifestyle intervention, the authors of a long-term study concluded. - Both an intensive lifestyle intervention and the drug metformin effectively slowed the progression to type 2 diabetes in women with a history of gestational diabetes. - It was estimated that 7 women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus would need to be treated to prevent 1 case of diabetes over 10 years. The Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study analyzed the long-term metabolic health in 288 women who had a previous diagnosis of gestational diabetes and 1226 mothers who did not have a history of the condition. The randomized trial assigned the women to intensive lifestyle intervention, the diabetes medication metformin, or a placebo. The lifestyle intervention sought to guide the women to reduce their body weight by 7% and participate in moderate cardiovascular exercise for 150 minutes a week. Blood glucose levels were measured twice a year for 6 years. During a 10-year span, women with a history of gestational diabetes who were assigned to placebo had a 48% higher risk of diabetes developing compared with women who did not have a history of gestational diabetes. Among women who had had gestational diabetes and underwent intensive lifestyle intervention, the risk of developing type 2 diabetes wa Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes

Gestational Diabetes

Your tax-deductible gift today can fund critical diabetes research and support vital diabetes education services that improve the lives of those with diabetes. Nearly 30 million battle diabetes and every 23 seconds someone new is diagnosed. Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Your gift today will help us get closer to curing diabetes and better treatments for those living with diabetes. Gestational diabetes ( GDM ), or diabetes during pregnancy, is when women have diabetes during pregnancy. They've never had diabetes before, and it goes away after pregnancy. But, unfortunately, that's not the end of the story. Once you've had GDM your chances are 2 in 3 that it will return in future pregnancies. And women who have had GDM are more than 7 times as likely to develop type 2 diabetes as women who didn't have diabetes in pregnancy. There aremany other health conditions that raise your risk, including: Lose weight. Are you more than 20% over your ideal body weight? Losing even a few pounds can help you prevent type 2 diabetes. Make healthy food choices. Follow simple daily guidelines, like eating enough fresh vegetables and fruits, and whole grains. Limit fat to 30% or less of your daily calories, and watch your portion sizes. Healthy eating habits can go a long way in preventing diabetes and other health problems. Stay active. Regular exercise can help prevent type 2 diabetes. Plus it can help you lose weight , manage stress , and feel better. Learn more about physical activity Breastfeed. If you can, breastfeed your baby. Breastfeeding can provide both short- and long-term benefits to both your baby and to you. Talk to your doctor. Be sure to tell your health care providers that you've had GDM. Get tested. If you had GDM, you should be Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Written by Natasha Leader, Accredited Practising Dietitian & Credentialled Diabetes Educator Having gestational diabetes (GDM) means you automatically have a very high risk of developing diabetes within a decade of your pregnancy. Although further pregnancies, genetic and ethnic factors can increase your risk of developing diabetes, studies show that a healthy lifestyle can reduce that risk by almost 60%. We’ve outlined 3 areas to focus on around diet, exercise and glucose level management. Involving and educating your family about these healthy lifestyle choices from early on is a great way to set them up for a healthy life as well. Eat well (and possibly less) You needn’t stick to the rigid diet you did when you were pregnant but it’s still a good idea to keep up the quality in your diet. Fatty or sugary ‘treats’ should be occasional so get the good stuff in first. Think about the foods and nutrients your body needs and work on counting that up, not focusing on all you ‘can’t’ have. Be inspired by good food and keep using GestationalDiabetesRecipes.com for ideas and current information. – Choose wholegrain and high fibre carbohydrates – this means fibre of (greater than) >3g per serve for breads, breakfast cereals etc. and grainy/wholemeal for crackers etc. (The nutritional panel on the packet will give you this information.) – Choose less processed products wherever possible. It’s likely these items will also be; much lower in salt/ sodium, contain way less additives, cost less and be more filling. Not only this but they’re also great for heart health and keeping your digestive system in peak order. – Fill up on vegetables. Add them cooked or as a salad with lunch, dinner, as a side at breakfast or as a snack. Veggies are your only truly Continue reading >>

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes: Women's Experiences And Implications For Diabetes Prevention Interventions.

Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes: Women's Experiences And Implications For Diabetes Prevention Interventions.

Diabet Med. 2013 Aug;30(8):986-93. doi: 10.1111/dme.12206. Epub 2013 Apr 19. Preventing type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes: women's experiences and implications for diabetes prevention interventions. Institute of Health and Society, Newcastle University, Newcastle upon Tyne, UK. To explore factors influencing post-natal health behaviours following the experience of gestational diabetes, and to elicit women's views about the feasibility of lifestyle intervention to prevent diabetes during the first 2 years after childbirth. Qualitative study using semi-structured interviews with women who had gestational diabetes. In phase 1 (31 women), interviews explored the experience of gestational diabetes, ideas about future risk of diabetes and factors influencing post-natal health-related behaviours. Statements were developed summarizing women's views of lifestyle change to prevent diabetes. In phase 2 (14 women), interviews explored how the passage of time had contributed to changes in health behaviour, and the statements were used to develop views about diabetes interventions. Women were aware of their risk of developing diabetes, but did not always act on such knowledge. Pregnancy motivated behaviour changes to benefit the unborn child, but after delivery these changes were often not maintained. Tiredness, maternal attachment and childcare demands were prominent barriers in the early post-natal months. Later, work, family and child development became more significant barriers. Many women became more receptive to healthy eating messages around the time of weaning. Women were positive about long-term support for self-management to reduce their diabetes risk. There is potential to reduce the risk of Type 2 diabetes post-natally among women with gestational diabetes. Inte Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Opportunity To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease In Young Women

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus: An Opportunity To Prevent Type 2 Diabetes And Cardiovascular Disease In Young Women

Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Section of Metabolic Diseases & Diabetes AOUP Pisa, University of Pisa, Ospedale Cisanello, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Tel.: +39 050 995 649, Fax.: +39 050 541 521 [email protected] Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Section of Metabolic Diseases & Diabetes AOUP Pisa, University of Pisa, Ospedale Cisanello, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Tel.: +39 050 995 649, Fax.: +39 050 541 521 [email protected] Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Section of Metabolic Diseases & Diabetes AOUP Pisa, University of Pisa, Ospedale Cisanello, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Tel.: +39 050 995 649, Fax.: +39 050 541 521 [email protected] Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Section of Metabolic Diseases & Diabetes AOUP Pisa, University of Pisa, Ospedale Cisanello, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Tel.: +39 050 995 133, Fax.: +39 050 541 521 [email protected] Department of Endocrinology & Metabolism, Section of Metabolic Diseases & Diabetes AOUP Pisa, University of Pisa, Ospedale Cisanello, Via Paradisa 2, 56124 Pisa, Italy. Tel.: +39 050 995496, Fax.: +39 050 541521 [email protected] Gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) is a common complication in pregnancy, occurring in 47% of pregnant women. GDM develops as soon as -cell secretion is no longer sufficient to compensate for physiological insulin resistance, which becomes evident in the second half of pregnancy. Obesity and a positive family history of Type 2 diabetes (T2DM) are the most significant risk factors for the development of GDM. Although after delivery glucose tolerance returns to normal in the majority of women with GDM, for many clinicians GDM represents an early stage in the natural history of T2DM. Factors that Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes 10 Years After The Index Pregnancy In Sri Lankan Women—a Community Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Gestational Diabetes Mellitus And Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes 10 Years After The Index Pregnancy In Sri Lankan Women—a Community Based Retrospective Cohort Study

Abstract Women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) have an increased risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) later in life compared to women with no GDM. This study was aimed to determine the risk of developing T2DM 10 years after GDM in Sri Lankan women. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in the Colombo district, Sri Lanka. 7205 women who delivered a child in 2005 were identified through Public Health Midwives in the field. Women with antenatal records were interviewed and relevant data were extracted from medical records to identify potential participants. One hundred and nineteen women who had GDM and 240 women who did not have GDM were recruited. Current diagnosis of diabetes was based on history, relevant medical records and blood reports within the past 1 year. Results The mean duration of follow up was 10.9 (SD = 0.35) years in the GDM group and 10.8 (SD = 0.31) years in the non-GDM group. The incidence density of diabetes in the GDM group was 56.3 per 1000 person years compared to 5.4 per 1000 person years in non GDM group giving a rate ratio of 10.42 (95% CI: 6.01–19.12). A woman having GDM in the index pregnancy was 10.6 times more likely to develop diabetes within 10 years compared to women with no GDM after controlling for other confounding variables. Delivering a child after 30 years, being treated with insulin during the pregnancy and delivering a baby weighing more than 3.5 Kg were significant predictors of development of T2DM after controlling for family history of diabetes mellitus (DM), GDM in previous pregnancies, parity and gestational age at delivery. Women with GDM had a 10-fold higher risk of developing T2DM during a 10-year follow up period as compared to women with no GDM after controlling for other confounding variab Continue reading >>

Time To Think About Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes?

Time To Think About Preventing Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes?

You may have risk factors which contributed to you being diagnosed with gestational diabetes which may also make you higher risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. But even if you didn't have ANY risk factors for gestational diabetes, you still need to think about preventing Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes, as having gestational diabetes itself is a risk factor for Type 2. Having gestational diabetes gives you a seven-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. It also gives your baby a six-fold increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes and obesity later in life, meaning it is best to not only think of your own diet and lifestyle choices, but also your family's. Risk of developing Type 2 diabetes after gestational diabetes for the mother Gestational diabetes increases your risk of developing type 2 diabetes after the pregnancy. Statistics from Diabetes UK state that there is a seven-fold increased risk in women with gestational diabetes developing type 2 diabetes in later life. NICE state that up to 50% of women diagnosed with gestational diabetes develop type 2 diabetes within 5 years of the birth. and a meta-analysis published in March 2014 state: In a systematic review conducted in 2009, body fat measures had the most consistent associations with diabetes risk compared with other types of factors including age, parity and family history of diabetes. Specifically, pre-pregnancy BMI was associated with significantly increased risk of future diabetes after a gestational diabetes delivery; for every 1 kg increase in pre-pregnancy weight, there was a 40% increase in odds of developing Type 2 diabetes (odds ratio 1.40, 95% CI 1.20–1.60). Intra-partum and post-partum weight measures were also associated with increased diabetes risk A 2002 publication fro Continue reading >>

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes

Metformin Prevents Type 2 Diabetes After Gestational Diabetes Both lifestyle intervention and use of the drug metformin reduced the risk for type 2 diabetes among women with a history of gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) in a 10-year study. But metformin failed to affect diabetes risk among those without a history of GDM, according to this new analysis of the Diabetes Prevention Program Outcomes Study (DPPOS), published online February 23 in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism by Vanita R Aroda, MD, from MedStar Health Research Institute, Hyattsville, Maryland, and colleagues. "This is probably the longest-term look at progression to [type 2] diabetes for women with a history of gestational diabetes," Dr Aroda told Medscape Medical News. The results confirm that pregnancy operates like a "stress test for the body," signaling a high probability of progression to diabetes, she said. "It's important to assess whether a woman had gestational diabetes. People tend to forget about it after the baby is delivered, but long after the baby is delivered the risk is quite high, and this study shows one can do something about it." Indeed, says coauthor William Herman, MD, MPH, from the University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, "This really emphasizes in my mind that metformin is a viable alternative to lifestyle intervention among women with a history of gestational diabetes." Women With Gestational Diabetes at Higher Risk for Type 2 Diabetes The women studied were part of the DPPOS, which is a long-term follow-up of the 3-year Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP), which randomized overweight or obese people at high risk for type 2 diabetes to intensive lifestyle change that included a goal of 7% weight loss and 150 minutes or more per week of moderate-intensity physical exe Continue reading >>

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect Us After Birth?

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect Us After Birth?

Will Gestational Diabetes Affect My Baby? Your baby will probably be healthy, if you and your doctor manage your blood sugar while you have gestational diabetes. Right after you give birth, doctors will check your newborn's blood sugar level. If its low, she may need to get glucose through an IV until it comes back up to normal. Gestational diabetes raises the chance that you will have a baby who is larger than normal. It's also linked to jaundice , in which the skin looks yellowish. Jaundice generally fades quickly with treatment. Although your child will be more likely than other kids to develop type 2 diabetes later on, a healthy lifestyle (including a good diet and lots of physical activity ) can cut that risk. Because you had gestational diabetes , you have a greater chance of developing type 2 diabetes . But it wont definitely happen, and you can take action to prevent that. Your blood sugar levels will likely return to normal about 6 weeks after childbirth . (Your doctor will check on that.) If it does, you should get follow-up tests every 3 years. Try to keep your weight in a healthy range. Not sure what that is? Ask your doctor. Eat a good diet that includes lots of vegetables, whole grains , fruits, and lean protein . If you plan to have another baby , keep in mind that you are more likely to get gestational diabetes again. Ask your doctor if there are any lifestyle changes that would help you avoid that. WebMD Medical Reference Reviewed by Traci C. Johnson, MD on April 19, 2017 American Diabetes Association: "Gestational Diabetes and What is Gestational Diabetes? Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality: "Gestational Diabetes: A Guide for Pregnant Women." American College of Nurse Midwives: "Gestational Diabetes." National Diabetes Education Program: Did Y Continue reading >>

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